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  • FIRST POST
    • twistershoot
    • By twistershoot 11th Jul 18, 12:22 PM
    • 17Posts
    • 2Thanks
    twistershoot
    jobs without a DBS check?
    • #1
    • 11th Jul 18, 12:22 PM
    jobs without a DBS check? 11th Jul 18 at 12:22 PM
    which jobs generally do not require one?
    and for those with previous convicitions did you find employment?
Page 1
    • Pixiedust22
    • By Pixiedust22 11th Jul 18, 12:27 PM
    • 11 Posts
    • 6 Thanks
    Pixiedust22
    • #2
    • 11th Jul 18, 12:27 PM
    • #2
    • 11th Jul 18, 12:27 PM
    Generally any job where you won't be working with vulnerable people (ie children, sick people, the elderly, disabled etc) won't require a DBS check. (Possibly also jobs where you have access to money? Not sure) For example an admin job in an office is unlikely to ask for a DBS check. They do sometimes ask about unspent convictions though. It also depends on what the conviction is for, I had to do a DBS check to work on open days at my uni (as the students who visit are under 18) and they told us they don't care if you have, for instance, a conviction for unpaid council tax, they're only interested in anything that's relevant to the job. But that would depend on the company I guess.
    • sangie595
    • By sangie595 11th Jul 18, 12:38 PM
    • 5,310 Posts
    • 9,132 Thanks
    sangie595
    • #3
    • 11th Jul 18, 12:38 PM
    • #3
    • 11th Jul 18, 12:38 PM
    which jobs generally do not require one?
    and for those with previous convicitions did you find employment?
    Originally posted by twistershoot
    That isn't the correct question. The correct question is "I have an unspent conviction - if I fail to declare it when asked, can I be sacked?". The answer is yes, you can be dismissed at any time if you lie in a job application. Legally, if they found out a decade later, you could be sacked for lying. Don't do it. If you do it, don't complain if they find out and sack you. These things have a way of working themselves out of the woodwork.
    • MarkN88
    • By MarkN88 11th Jul 18, 1:03 PM
    • 168 Posts
    • 71 Thanks
    MarkN88
    • #4
    • 11th Jul 18, 1:03 PM
    • #4
    • 11th Jul 18, 1:03 PM
    I!!!8217;ve worked in areas like this so know a great deal.

    If you want to chat privately than feel free to message me.

    There is a correct way to declare and as long as you follow their procedures.
    • motorguy
    • By motorguy 11th Jul 18, 1:14 PM
    • 17,327 Posts
    • 10,462 Thanks
    motorguy
    • #5
    • 11th Jul 18, 1:14 PM
    • #5
    • 11th Jul 18, 1:14 PM
    That isn't the correct question. The correct question is "I have an unspent conviction - if I fail to declare it when asked, can I be sacked?". The answer is yes, you can be dismissed at any time if you lie in a job application. Legally, if they found out a decade later, you could be sacked for lying. Don't do it. If you do it, don't complain if they find out and sack you. These things have a way of working themselves out of the woodwork.
    Originally posted by sangie595
    All very true, however the position a lot of people with an unspent conviction will find themselves in is that if they declare it, they wont get the job, therefore they find it worth the risk to not declare it.

    And i've never heard too many people complain if they are subsequently sacked, as they know what they've done on the application.
    "We have normality. I repeat, we have normality. Anything you still can't cope with is therefore your own problem."
    • RichardD1970
    • By RichardD1970 11th Jul 18, 2:41 PM
    • 3,019 Posts
    • 4,480 Thanks
    RichardD1970
    • #6
    • 11th Jul 18, 2:41 PM
    • #6
    • 11th Jul 18, 2:41 PM
    Generally any job where you won't be working with vulnerable people (ie children, sick people, the elderly, disabled etc) won't require a DBS check. (Possibly also jobs where you have access to money? Not sure) For example an admin job in an office is unlikely to ask for a DBS check. They do sometimes ask about unspent convictions though. It also depends on what the conviction is for, I had to do a DBS check to work on open days at my uni (as the students who visit are under 18) and they told us they don't care if you have, for instance, a conviction for unpaid council tax, they're only interested in anything that's relevant to the job. But that would depend on the company I guess.
    Originally posted by Pixiedust22
    For my factory job we had to have a Disclosure Scotland check. Don't know what the difference between that and DBS is.

    People who were found to have not given the full facts were subsequently sacked, but I do know a few people with convictions that they declared on the applications and interviews that got and kept jobs.
    • motorguy
    • By motorguy 11th Jul 18, 3:20 PM
    • 17,327 Posts
    • 10,462 Thanks
    motorguy
    • #7
    • 11th Jul 18, 3:20 PM
    • #7
    • 11th Jul 18, 3:20 PM
    For my factory job we had to have a Disclosure Scotland check. Don't know what the difference between that and DBS is.

    People who were found to have not given the full facts were subsequently sacked, but I do know a few people with convictions that they declared on the applications and interviews that got and kept jobs.
    Originally posted by RichardD1970
    That would be the general thinking. My wifes company takes on probably 50+ people a month and if there is a subsequent Disclosure Scotland done, those who have declared (where they are obliged to declare it, ie, within 5 years) are fine.

    They have to advise you they are going to do a DBS check though from memory of what she was telling me, so not telling and knowing they were going to do a DBS check would be fairly dumb.
    "We have normality. I repeat, we have normality. Anything you still can't cope with is therefore your own problem."
    • ohreally
    • By ohreally 11th Jul 18, 3:34 PM
    • 6,758 Posts
    • 5,288 Thanks
    ohreally
    • #8
    • 11th Jul 18, 3:34 PM
    • #8
    • 11th Jul 18, 3:34 PM
    I!!!8217;ve worked in areas like this so know a great deal.

    If you want to chat privately than feel free to message me.

    There is a correct way to declare and as long as you follow their procedures.
    Originally posted by MarkN88
    Perhaps well meaning but this avoids checks and balances of open discussion.
    Donít be a canít, be a can.
    • MarkN88
    • By MarkN88 11th Jul 18, 3:50 PM
    • 168 Posts
    • 71 Thanks
    MarkN88
    • #9
    • 11th Jul 18, 3:50 PM
    • #9
    • 11th Jul 18, 3:50 PM
    I wasn!!!8217;t telling him to avoid a check,I just mean generally there are correct ways to disclose to an employer.

    If ajob requires a DBS check then you can!!!8217;t get around that,
    • coffeehound
    • By coffeehound 11th Jul 18, 3:56 PM
    • 1,782 Posts
    • 2,733 Thanks
    coffeehound
    OP probably wouldn't be able to PM anyone yet
    • RichardD1970
    • By RichardD1970 11th Jul 18, 4:21 PM
    • 3,019 Posts
    • 4,480 Thanks
    RichardD1970
    Perhaps well meaning but this avoids checks and balances of open discussion.
    Originally posted by ohreally
    I wasn't telling him to avoid a check,I just mean generally there are correct ways to disclose to an employer.

    If ajob requires a DBS check then you can't get around that,
    Originally posted by MarkN88
    That's not what he meant.

    By reverting to PM's the you would be able to feed the OP any old nonsense (not saying you would) and there would be no one to query or correct your advice if needed.

    That's why it is better to remain in open discussion, as well as getting a full spectrum of opinion.
    • MarkN88
    • By MarkN88 11th Jul 18, 5:28 PM
    • 168 Posts
    • 71 Thanks
    MarkN88
    Yeah that makes sense Richard
    • beckysheffield
    • By beckysheffield 11th Jul 18, 9:34 PM
    • 231 Posts
    • 30 Thanks
    beckysheffield
    Generally any job where you won't be working with vulnerable people (ie children, sick people, the elderly, disabled etc) won't require a DBS check. (Possibly also jobs where you have access to money? Not sure) For example an admin job in an office is unlikely to ask for a DBS check. They do sometimes ask about unspent convictions though. It also depends on what the conviction is for, I had to do a DBS check to work on open days at my uni (as the students who visit are under 18) and they told us they don't care if you have, for instance, a conviction for unpaid council tax, they're only interested in anything that's relevant to the job. But that would depend on the company I guess.
    Originally posted by Pixiedust22
    A uni open day is the same as going to a shopping Centre. Why would you need a DBS?
    • Les79
    • By Les79 11th Jul 18, 11:11 PM
    • 441 Posts
    • 548 Thanks
    Les79
    To be honest, I don't necessarily think that OP is looking to lie on an application form; just more get an idea of what sort of jobs they can apply for and what sort would be a waste of time trying for.

    Also, OP, depending on your unspent conviction there is a possibility that the company will take you on even if declared. Not as likely as other people, but it can happen.
    • sangie595
    • By sangie595 12th Jul 18, 12:18 AM
    • 5,310 Posts
    • 9,132 Thanks
    sangie595
    For my factory job we had to have a Disclosure Scotland check. Don't know what the difference between that and DBS is.

    People who were found to have not given the full facts were subsequently sacked, but I do know a few people with convictions that they declared on the applications and interviews that got and kept jobs.
    Originally posted by RichardD1970
    Anyone can ask for a Disclosure Scotland basic check (it's the DBS for Scotland, but they have wider categories of checks) - including English or Welsh employers. You neither needs to live nor work in Scotland. There was always supposed to be a basic check inEngland and Wakes, but it never happened. An employer can also require you to provide a subject access request from the police, which will list convictions.

    I have noted that a growing number of employers are asking for one or the other. Which employers will ask and which won't is impossible to guess at. They often only ask when offering the job or even before taking up the position. So if you've lied on the application, it will come out at that stage, and they won't take well to it.

    What an employer might make of a conviction depends on what it is, when and how well you explain it. As well as relevance to the job.
    • Savvy_Sue
    • By Savvy_Sue 12th Jul 18, 1:45 AM
    • 39,037 Posts
    • 35,916 Thanks
    Savvy_Sue
    I!!!8217;ve worked in areas like this so know a great deal.

    If you want to chat privately than feel free to message me.

    There is a correct way to declare and as long as you follow their procedures.
    Originally posted by MarkN88
    it would be worth getting advice on how to disclose from an organisation such as NACRO. If the OP has a probation officer, might be worth talking to them: there may be a local organisation which can offer help with the job search.

    I have noted that a growing number of employers are asking for one or the other.
    Originally posted by sangie595
    And the request for a DBS check is, I suspect, not always 'allowed': there has to be a reason for the employer requiring one. For example, our front-line staff have to have one, but we've been advised that the employer can't require one for back office staff who don't regularly interact with our clients.

    What an employer might make of a conviction depends on what it is, when and how well you explain it. As well as relevance to the job.
    Originally posted by sangie595
    Absolutely, which is why getting support with disclosing is a good idea.
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    • Robin9
    • By Robin9 12th Jul 18, 7:13 AM
    • 3,088 Posts
    • 2,032 Thanks
    Robin9
    DBS's don't really mean a lot - there are people out there who haven't been caught yet.
    Never pay on an estimated bill
    • sangie595
    • By sangie595 12th Jul 18, 9:18 AM
    • 5,310 Posts
    • 9,132 Thanks
    sangie595
    it would be worth getting advice on how to disclose from an organisation such as NACRO. If the OP has a probation officer, might be worth talking to them: there may be a local organisation which can offer help with the job search.

    And the request for a DBS check is, I suspect, not always 'allowed': there has to be a reason for the employer requiring one. For example, our front-line staff have to have one, but we've been advised that the employer can't require one for back office staff who don't regularly interact with our clients.

    Absolutely, which is why getting support with disclosing is a good idea.
    Originally posted by Savvy_Sue
    I do agree. But just to be clear, I meant that I'm noticing more employers asking for a SAR or Disclosure Scotland rather than DBS per se. These are employers who wouldn't be able to ask for a DBS and know they can't. In my experience if they aren't entitled to ask for a DBS they generally can't get one anyway. However, I'm in two minds about this trend. On the one hand, I'm firmly in favour of employing people with a record - and to be honest, in some places you'd struggle too recruit if you didn't given how many people have one! On the other hand, if someone has asked, then they should be asking for evidence of fact - just like you'd ask for certificates to support qualifications listed or proof of the right to work. There's no point asking if it doesn't matter or you don't verify it. Overall, I think I'd say that the current system isn't fit for purpose. It's neither fish nor fowl. It's changed little since 1974, and I don't think that what was a good idea then is quite so good now - society has changed a lot.
    • twistershoot
    • By twistershoot 12th Jul 18, 11:44 AM
    • 17 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    twistershoot
    That isn't the correct question. The correct question is "I have an unspent conviction - if I fail to declare it when asked, can I be sacked?". The answer is yes, you can be dismissed at any time if you lie in a job application. Legally, if they found out a decade later, you could be sacked for lying. Don't do it. If you do it, don't complain if they find out and sack you. These things have a way of working themselves out of the woodwork.
    Originally posted by sangie595
    No this is not what I asked. I am aware of what you have mentioned. I am also aware that once my conviction is spent I will not have to declare in certain situations/ jobs, which is covered by the ROA 1974.

    As that is some time away, I am asking for people who are in a similar situation as to what their experience has been in terms of looking for work.

    I am fully aware of the risks of not decalring it and potentially facing a sack.
    • twistershoot
    • By twistershoot 12th Jul 18, 11:48 AM
    • 17 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    twistershoot
    I!!!8217;ve worked in areas like this so know a great deal.

    If you want to chat privately than feel free to message me.

    There is a correct way to declare and as long as you follow their procedures.
    Originally posted by MarkN88
    Hi I would appreciate it if you could share your ideas, I am unable to PM you as I don't have that privilege yet.
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