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  • FIRST POST
    • LyndseyB
    • By LyndseyB 10th Jul 18, 10:03 PM
    • 1Posts
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    LyndseyB
    Home Structural engineer problem
    • #1
    • 10th Jul 18, 10:03 PM
    Home Structural engineer problem 10th Jul 18 at 10:03 PM
    Hi I was wondering if yourselves may be able to assist me with some help & advice please

    We bought & moved into a new property 2 months ago which we had a home buyers survey on which indicated some cracking around the brickwork surrounding the patio doors which did not have a steel lintel, so as a result a structural engineer was instructed by the previous owners, who recommended building works to rectify the issue to make it structurally safe - a concrete lintel has been bolted in. Builders were instructed by the previous owners and the work carried out.

    Since we have moved in the patio doors have been unusable and unfit for purpose, so much so that we have instructed an independent structural engineer to assess the work previously carried out. They have concluded that the building work carried out has made the patio doors unusable because the work carried out has resulted in a 20mm 'sag'/drop in the middle. In simple terms the door frames are bowed / bent.
    The doors being unusable are a fire hazard as we have no exit there

    The questions we have is who is legally responsible to correct and carry out further works to rectify this problem?
    We have initially contacted our insurers Churchill to who have unfortunately advised our buildings insurance will not cover any of this.

    We have contacted our solicitor about this all who can try to fight / resolve this or a small claims court but of course would be at our cost for expenses etc which could tally to thousands
    We are so upset & distressed by this situation.

    Thanks!
Page 1
    • G_M
    • By G_M 10th Jul 18, 10:08 PM
    • 44,749 Posts
    • 53,261 Thanks
    G_M
    • #2
    • 10th Jul 18, 10:08 PM
    • #2
    • 10th Jul 18, 10:08 PM
    ......... as a result a structural engineer was instructed by the previous owners, who recommended building works to rectify the issue to make it structurally safe - a concrete lintel has been bolted in.

    Builders were instructed by the previous owners and the work carried out.
    Originally posted by LyndseyB
    If there is clear evidence of poor workmanship, the previous owners would have a case against the builders.

    I'm afraid you've learned a lesson the hard way.
    • Cakeguts
    • By Cakeguts 10th Jul 18, 11:15 PM
    • 4,575 Posts
    • 6,596 Thanks
    Cakeguts
    • #3
    • 10th Jul 18, 11:15 PM
    • #3
    • 10th Jul 18, 11:15 PM
    This is why you have structural engineer's report before you buy or you take the risk and you do not accept any work done by sellers without checking that it has been done properly.



    There is nothing you can do about this because it wasn't your builders who did the work and you didn't check that it was done to your satisfaction before you paid for the house.



    This is an example of why if a house you are buying needs work you do not have it done by the seller you either leave it and get it done when you own the house or you withdraw your offer and look for a different property. When you paid for the house you accepted it in the condition that it was in.
    • avacapri
    • By avacapri 11th Jul 18, 6:39 AM
    • 30 Posts
    • 8 Thanks
    avacapri
    • #4
    • 11th Jul 18, 6:39 AM
    • #4
    • 11th Jul 18, 6:39 AM
    how big are the doors?

    we had a lintel put in and the engineer explained that over a large span the can bow but I would be surprised if a concrete one does as they are normally just short spans - perhaps the lintel is defective and as such you may have a claim, perhaps the builders packed out the frame and forced it down, I would get some builders in to look at it as the solution may be very easy and cost very little.
    I am just guessing - especially if the frames are upvc they can bend easily and if the builders have packed out the centre section forcing it down it will create a bow.
    • anselld
    • By anselld 11th Jul 18, 6:47 AM
    • 5,819 Posts
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    anselld
    • #5
    • 11th Jul 18, 6:47 AM
    • #5
    • 11th Jul 18, 6:47 AM
    Forget the window for a minute, the purpose of the lintel is to support the rest of the house, not to aid the function of the doors.

    So is the new structural engineer satisfied with the lintel and the structure? If so then just get a double glazing Company in to adjust the fit of the frames and doors.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 11th Jul 18, 6:53 AM
    • 25,588 Posts
    • 93,616 Thanks
    Davesnave
    • #6
    • 11th Jul 18, 6:53 AM
    • #6
    • 11th Jul 18, 6:53 AM
    This is why people should never get an owner to rectify shortcomings before purchase. Being human, they will tend to get Bill the Bodger and his mates to carry out the fix at the cheapest price.


    Far better to negotiate a reduction and deal with any matters of concern after taking possession.


    Never mind, you're not the first people to be upset at a problem you've discovered on purchase, but it's hardly a situation to warrant 'distress,' because it can be remedied.
    If you are finding huge gaps between your paragraphs, MSE know about the problem. However, they aren't necessarily doing anything about it. More changes on the way?
    https://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.php?t=5844460
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