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  • FIRST POST
    • nnb
    • By nnb 9th Jul 18, 2:44 PM
    • 53Posts
    • 7Thanks
    nnb
    'Landlord only' storage being added to rental property
    • #1
    • 9th Jul 18, 2:44 PM
    'Landlord only' storage being added to rental property 9th Jul 18 at 2:44 PM
    My LL has announced an enormous shed is being put on my property. This was mentioned in my tenancy agreement so I was aware this would happen and I realise I have no choice. The problem is what I've since found out...

    When I was notified it's going in, I mentioned how I don't need the shed so do they want to save the hassle and just forget about it. I was told it's not for my use anyway... It's for theirs! My tenancy clearly states I will have use of it, and there is no mention anywhere that it would be used by anyone other than me. There is also a section about shared areas, and there are no areas listed. So as far as I am aware, the entire property is for my sole use as is the forthcoming shed.

    Where do I stand on this as it's not what was in my agreement?
    Is adding in extra storage AFTER I've moved in purely for their personal use allowed?
    Can I still request access to it?
    Surely this causes all kind of issues with accessing the property as they and others will be coming and going whenever to access it?
    Does it break my 'right to quiet enjoyment' if nothing else? He's already been on the property unannounced to measure up which scared the life out of me.
    As I guess it will be going in anyway, will the 24 hour rule apply here too?
    What if they want to access it at unusual hours, eg 6am or 9pm, am I allowed to state times he can access it so I can enjoy my property/garden?

    I absolutely love living here and have been told they're happy with me being here too so we both see this as a long term let. We have a great relationship so I'm really not trying to be difficult, I just don't feel comfortable with this whole thing (especially as I'm a female living alone) and want to find a way to solve any potential issues beforehand and have it in writing so we both know where we stand and can carry on with our otherwise great LL/tenant agreement!
Page 2
    • Quizzical Squirrel
    • By Quizzical Squirrel 9th Jul 18, 4:55 PM
    • 220 Posts
    • 4,717 Thanks
    Quizzical Squirrel
    Just to add that although admittedly I have had a horrendous landlord privacy issue in the past, just in my experience I have found that 'giving' the landlord access to something in the garden doesn't mean it will stop there.

    For example, my last 3 rentals:

    1) I agreed to a vegetable plot in the far corner of a 5 acre garden. The landlord from hell used it to deliberately sit there and wait for me to leave the house, several times a week. Then he would let himself in. It was as bad as you might imagine. This is an extreme example but it wouldn't have happened if he hadn't arranged an excuse to be there.

    2) The contract specified that another landlord would himself maintain a hot tub on the back garden. He was a decent man but occasionally couldn't resist the temptation of letting himself into the house if I wasn't there. Just to check things while he's there.

    3) Same (but only a couple of times a year) with a third landlady who liked to prune her beloved shrubs herself. I carefully mentioned it once and she was 'just using the toilet because she was desperate' when she was outside in the garden.
    I bet this one happens to you with the storage shed. Just popped in to use the toilet.

    That's 3 out of 3 for me. I've been a landlord myself but I've now started to believe at least half of landlords can't resist the temptation if they're on the spot and see the opportunity.
    Last edited by Quizzical Squirrel; 09-07-2018 at 4:58 PM.
    • CIS
    • By CIS 9th Jul 18, 5:10 PM
    • 10,569 Posts
    • 6,105 Thanks
    CIS
    Just to add that although admittedly I have had a horrendous landlord privacy issue in the past, just in my experience I have found that 'giving' the landlord access to something in the garden doesn't mean it will stop there.

    For example, my last 3 rentals:

    1) I agreed to a vegetable plot in the far corner of a 5 acre garden. The landlord from hell used it to deliberately sit there and wait for me to leave the house, several times a week. Then he would let himself in. It was as bad as you might imagine. This is an extreme example but it wouldn't have happened if he hadn't arranged an excuse to be there.

    2) The contract specified that another landlord would himself maintain a hot tub on the back garden. He was a decent man but occasionally couldn't resist the temptation of letting himself into the house if I wasn't there. Just to check things while he's there.

    3) Same (but only a couple of times a year) with a third landlady who liked to prune her beloved shrubs herself. I carefully mentioned it once and she was 'just using the toilet because she was desperate' when she was outside in the garden.
    I bet this one happens to you with the storage shed. Just popped in to use the toilet.

    That's 3 out of 3 for me. I've been a landlord myself but I've now started to believe at least half of landlords can't resist the temptation if they're on the spot and see the opportunity.
    Originally posted by Quizzical Squirrel

    I think you're right - once a landlord starts there's often a slip in to even worse behaviour.
    I no longer work in Council Tax Recovery but instead work as a self employed Council Tax specialist. My views are my own reading of the law and you should always check with the local authority in question.
    • Cakeguts
    • By Cakeguts 9th Jul 18, 5:13 PM
    • 4,561 Posts
    • 6,573 Thanks
    Cakeguts
    I think you're right - once a landlord starts there's often a slip in to even worse behaviour.
    Originally posted by CIS

    It is pretty obvious really as to why that might happen as in this case where the landlord doesn't think that the letting rules apply to him.
    • Quizzical Squirrel
    • By Quizzical Squirrel 9th Jul 18, 5:32 PM
    • 220 Posts
    • 4,717 Thanks
    Quizzical Squirrel
    I think once you've broken that barrier between private tenant property and the landlord, something changes because of that territory boundary change.

    Some will start to feel ... what would be the phrase ... familiarity breeds contempt?
    Those little permissions we give ourselves, those increasing tiny steps, can start to stack up.
    What someone absolutely wouldn't on the first visit, they might well do on the tenth.
    Little creeping steps, each one not much more than they did last time.

    I know I've been over-sensitised about landlord privacy but even with my most objective hat on, I wouldn't give them that first toe-hold. You just don't know which way they're going to go, no matter how nice they seem.
    • thelem
    • By thelem 9th Jul 18, 6:11 PM
    • 747 Posts
    • 546 Thanks
    thelem
    As mentioned above, if you prevent the landlord from doing something they really want you to do then they can solve the problem by serving notice on you and finding a new tenant. You can use your current contract against him for the remainder of the fixed term (if applicable), but after that he is free to offer you new terms, which may include a shed in the garden.


    If I were your landlord I would allow you to use the shed for the remainder of your fixed term. After that, I would offer a new contract that did not include the shed or any of the land that is required to access the shed.


    Where is the shed? Does it have its own road access?
    Note: Unless otherwise stated, my property related posts refer to England & Wales. Please make sure you state if you are discussing Scotland or elsewhere as laws differ.
    • bris
    • By bris 9th Jul 18, 6:21 PM
    • 7,729 Posts
    • 6,715 Thanks
    bris
    A sheds an outbuilding and not part of the property so council tax isn't an issue.


    Bottom line is you are going to have problems with this regardless of what you want.
    You can choose to move, object or live with it, the objection will likely se you get a S21.
    Next time he will rent it shed in place with clear demands on it so some one will take it and will live with it.


    And to be fair it's in the tenancy so you knew this was coming so not really a big surprise is it.
    • Cakeguts
    • By Cakeguts 9th Jul 18, 10:15 PM
    • 4,561 Posts
    • 6,573 Thanks
    Cakeguts
    A sheds an outbuilding and not part of the property so council tax isn't an issue.


    Bottom line is you are going to have problems with this regardless of what you want.
    You can choose to move, object or live with it, the objection will likely se you get a S21.
    Next time he will rent it shed in place with clear demands on it so some one will take it and will live with it.


    And to be fair it's in the tenancy so you knew this was coming so not really a big surprise is it.
    Originally posted by bris

    It might be in the tenancy agreement but also in there is the fact that the tenant is renting the house the drive and the garage. How can they be renting the drive and the garage if there is a shed on the drive? Bascially the tenant is going to be paying for part of the property that they can't use because the landlord has parked a large shed on it.



    The least that should happen is a reduction in rent to reflect that the landlord has removed part of the property from the tenant's use.
    • tlc678910
    • By tlc678910 10th Jul 18, 1:08 PM
    • 582 Posts
    • 974 Thanks
    tlc678910
    I think realistically you can't do much without souring your pleasant relationship with the landlord and in time getting served notice. If the plan goes ahead at best the stuff could be stored long term and forgotten about with little access require, at worst lots of coming and going which would perhaps cause you to want to move on anyway.

    If there is a gate that can be padlocked (one key to you, one to landlord) it would offer some security so that randoms can't come and go without getting the key from them. Or you could lock the gate and hold the only key with the agreement you will leave it unlocked when the landlord has asked to access the shed.

    I would ask to discuss terms but compromise e.g. you would like the shed and gate locked to discourage burglars and no visits before 7am/after 7pm (or 9am/5pm if you find that more agreeable) without prior appointment and no visits in hours of darkness (which in the winter may be long) without prior appointment.
    Tlc
    • Nobbie1967
    • By Nobbie1967 10th Jul 18, 1:53 PM
    • 770 Posts
    • 857 Thanks
    Nobbie1967
    Too many posts are just pushing you to be adversarial about this issue, that won't end well. As posted above, the best route is to request a meeting with your landlord to discuss all the issues around the shed that have been raised on this thread. You currently have a good relationship and they have previously behaved well. Get an idea of what they will be using it for and whether you can come to an agreement on times of access and who has access, the last thing you want is some stranger poking around your garden at midnight.

    Don't go into this expecting it to be a big issue, just see it as sorting out arrangements for managing his access and remind him that he can't just pop into the house while he's there (if this is even a likely issue)

    You currently have a property at below market rent with a seemingly decent landlord, I'm sure there is a way to keep you both happy.
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