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  • FIRST POST
    • ProStuart
    • By ProStuart 9th Jul 18, 2:32 PM
    • 33Posts
    • 1Thanks
    ProStuart
    How long is reasonable time to reply?
    • #1
    • 9th Jul 18, 2:32 PM
    How long is reasonable time to reply? 9th Jul 18 at 2:32 PM
    Hi,


    I made an original post about my mothers death back in March and that solicitors had been named executors. I expressed back then the frustration and delay that this causes and understood from this community it's "normal".


    However, I now have a couple of related questions....


    Apart from a letter back in mid-April advising me that they hope to start processing the probate application soon, I have not heard anything from the solicitors since.


    I called them 2 working days ago and left a message with the secretary asking for 2 things:


    1 - an explanation as to why the process is taking so long - if the average is 3-6 months for the size/complexity of estate, we're now 4 months in and they have yet to ask for the keys to the house that's to be sold.


    2 - what will be done about the property upkeep? I popped in there last week and the front/back gardens are completely overgrown - let alone what else might be happening inside the house (ie. electrics, boiler, pipes, etc.) when nobody is living there. Surely if it's left untouched, it will affect the selling price?


    Is it reasonable for me to have expected a reply by now?


    Any useful feedback from this community would be welcomed!!!
Page 1
    • Yorkshireman99
    • By Yorkshireman99 9th Jul 18, 2:57 PM
    • 4,689 Posts
    • 3,918 Thanks
    Yorkshireman99
    • #2
    • 9th Jul 18, 2:57 PM
    • #2
    • 9th Jul 18, 2:57 PM
    Hi,


    I made an original post about my mothers death back in March and that solicitors had been named executors. I expressed back then the frustration and delay that this causes and understood from this community it's "normal".


    However, I now have a couple of related questions....


    Apart from a letter back in mid-April advising me that they hope to start processing the probate application soon, I have not heard anything from the solicitors since.


    I called them 2 working days ago and left a message with the secretary asking for 2 things:


    1 - an explanation as to why the process is taking so long - if the average is 3-6 months for the size/complexity of estate, we're now 4 months in and they have yet to ask for the keys to the house that's to be sold.


    2 - what will be done about the property upkeep? I popped in there last week and the front/back gardens are completely overgrown - let alone what else might be happening inside the house (ie. electrics, boiler, pipes, etc.) when nobody is living there. Surely if it's left untouched, it will affect the selling price?


    Is it reasonable for me to have expected a reply by now?


    Any useful feedback from this community would be welcomed!!!
    Originally posted by ProStuart
    Personally I would lodge a formal complaint under the firms own complaints procedure. This has to be done in writing.
    • Margot123
    • By Margot123 9th Jul 18, 4:47 PM
    • 1,089 Posts
    • 1,123 Thanks
    Margot123
    • #3
    • 9th Jul 18, 4:47 PM
    • #3
    • 9th Jul 18, 4:47 PM
    Executors are not obliged to keep beneficiaries updated, and solicitors are notorious for not doing so.

    However, it might be prudent to write a good old fashioned 'signed for' letter to the senior partner expressing your concerns.
    Be clear about what is and isn't happening and how this is affecting you both financially and psychologically (eg worries about security of the house etc).

    If they offer to do weekly visits to the house, don't bother, they will charge for basically a non-existent service. Is there a good neighbour who can pop in?
    • Brynsam
    • By Brynsam 9th Jul 18, 7:33 PM
    • 1,676 Posts
    • 1,232 Thanks
    Brynsam
    • #4
    • 9th Jul 18, 7:33 PM
    • #4
    • 9th Jul 18, 7:33 PM
    Personally I would lodge a formal complaint under the firms own complaints procedure. This has to be done in writing.
    Originally posted by Yorkshireman99
    Complaining about what, exactly? There doesn't seem to have been any breach of executor duties and the solicitors will, quite reasonably, argue that they are doing their best to keep costs down.

    Agree with the suggestion that writing a letter setting out OP's concerns, especially the maintenance issue, makes good sense - but as we are in the middle of summer, there are far fewer concerns (e.g. burst pipes) than there would be in the middle of winter.
    • Flugelhorn
    • By Flugelhorn 10th Jul 18, 8:06 AM
    • 1,030 Posts
    • 1,246 Thanks
    Flugelhorn
    • #5
    • 10th Jul 18, 8:06 AM
    • #5
    • 10th Jul 18, 8:06 AM
    Although the executors are responsible for selling and caring for the house it is a shame that they don't let the beneficiary have a hand in caring for it and marketing it. I just wonder if they assume that "someone" is doing the garden etc?


    I know that if my mother's house had not had the garden done regularly , been checked by a neighbour inside and out weekly (as per insurance company requirements), cleaned, cleared and tidied by us then it would have been much harder to sell and ultimately wouldn't have got the price it did

    I think the OP needs to clarify with the solicitors what the plans and process re the property is
    • ProStuart
    • By ProStuart 10th Jul 18, 11:11 AM
    • 33 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    ProStuart
    • #6
    • 10th Jul 18, 11:11 AM
    • #6
    • 10th Jul 18, 11:11 AM
    Thanks for your input everyone.


    My question was more asking what a reasonable timeframe was for the solicitor to respond. I had hoped 24 hours would have been reasonable as it is with most other things.


    It's now 3 working days and zip so I've actually written a formal complaint to them (this delay just ended up being the final straw).

    Thanks again
    • Flugelhorn
    • By Flugelhorn 10th Jul 18, 11:46 AM
    • 1,030 Posts
    • 1,246 Thanks
    Flugelhorn
    • #7
    • 10th Jul 18, 11:46 AM
    • #7
    • 10th Jul 18, 11:46 AM
    I would be miffed after 3 working days - would perhaps expect a "holding message" at the very least
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