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  • FIRST POST
    • 3card
    • By 3card 9th Jul 18, 11:06 AM
    • 176Posts
    • 64Thanks
    3card
    Glass conservatory roof panel smashed
    • #1
    • 9th Jul 18, 11:06 AM
    Glass conservatory roof panel smashed 9th Jul 18 at 11:06 AM
    Hi all


    Approx. 2 years ago we had a conservatory with glass roof double glazed panels. On Saturday we came back after being out to find the floor covered with glass. The inner panel had shattered.


    I have started the ball rolling with getting a replacement unit from the conservatory manufacturers but I now this this is a major safety issue and I am looking round to see if there are any installers of the film that can be applied in insitu that will hold the glass in the event of this happening again


    Has anyone got any experiences of this or any recommendations for this kind of service.


    I am not a worrying person usually but this has got me extremely concerned regarding safety
Page 1
    • Silvertabby
    • By Silvertabby 9th Jul 18, 12:05 PM
    • 2,994 Posts
    • 4,267 Thanks
    Silvertabby
    • #2
    • 9th Jul 18, 12:05 PM
    • #2
    • 9th Jul 18, 12:05 PM
    I thought the 'film' was standard? We've been lucky so far, but a neighbour lost an outer panel to a flying roof tile. The glass stayed in one piece, although it was a mass of cracks.
    • Geodark
    • By Geodark 9th Jul 18, 1:05 PM
    • 812 Posts
    • 527 Thanks
    Geodark
    • #3
    • 9th Jul 18, 1:05 PM
    • #3
    • 9th Jul 18, 1:05 PM
    Hi all


    Approx. 2 years ago we had a conservatory with glass roof double glazed panels. On Saturday we came back after being out to find the floor covered with glass. The inner panel had shattered.


    I have started the ball rolling with getting a replacement unit from the conservatory manufacturers but I now this this is a major safety issue and I am looking round to see if there are any installers of the film that can be applied in insitu that will hold the glass in the event of this happening again


    Has anyone got any experiences of this or any recommendations for this kind of service.


    I am not a worrying person usually but this has got me extremely concerned regarding safety
    Originally posted by 3card
    By shattered do you mean that it was broken into a million little bits? if so then this is toughened safety glass. If it hasn't and it has fell down in big clumps then this is not a safety glass. If it was lamintated (2 sheets of glass with a film between) then it would have broke, but stayed in one piece.
    • 3card
    • By 3card 9th Jul 18, 1:37 PM
    • 176 Posts
    • 64 Thanks
    3card
    • #4
    • 9th Jul 18, 1:37 PM
    • #4
    • 9th Jul 18, 1:37 PM
    By shattered do you mean that it was broken into a million little bits? if so then this is toughened safety glass. If it hasn't and it has fell down in big clumps then this is not a safety glass. If it was lamintated (2 sheets of glass with a film between) then it would have broke, but stayed in one piece.
    Originally posted by Geodark


    Hi


    Yes it was in a million little pieces and I also know it was toughened glass.
    I have spoken to a few companies this morning and they have all confirmed that this sounds ok to current standards I find it hard to believe that it shouldn't be laminated.
    They also told me that this type of occurrence is very rare


    I have also spoken to a company this morning about fitting a film and I have arranged for them to come round to have a look and give me a quotation
    • Furts
    • By Furts 9th Jul 18, 2:31 PM
    • 4,384 Posts
    • 2,838 Thanks
    Furts
    • #5
    • 9th Jul 18, 2:31 PM
    • #5
    • 9th Jul 18, 2:31 PM
    Hi


    Yes it was in a million little pieces and I also know it was toughened glass.
    I have spoken to a few companies this morning and they have all confirmed that this sounds ok to current standards I find it hard to believe that it shouldn't be laminated.
    They also told me that this type of occurrence is very rare


    I have also spoken to a company this morning about fitting a film and I have arranged for them to come round to have a look and give me a quotation
    Originally posted by 3card

    You had the conservatory built to your Specification, you managed and inspected the work and you faced up to your legal duties regarding safety.. This means if you are now unhappy with your decision to specify toughened glass then you cannot blame the installers. Indeed, from a legal perspective, you are in dodgy area under your legal duties under the CDM Regs.



    Viewed in a different light, conservatory design and installation is all an unregulated area of work. Which means anything goes, and toughened glass roofs will be installed in many instances. Since everything is unregulated the consumer is giving conservatory companies a free habnd to do as they please. Unless of course they manage and control this, and face up to their legal duties. It seems you fell short here.
    • 3card
    • By 3card 9th Jul 18, 4:42 PM
    • 176 Posts
    • 64 Thanks
    3card
    • #6
    • 9th Jul 18, 4:42 PM
    • #6
    • 9th Jul 18, 4:42 PM
    You had the conservatory built to your Specification, you managed and inspected the work and you faced up to your legal duties regarding safety.. This means if you are now unhappy with your decision to specify toughened glass then you cannot blame the installers. Indeed, from a legal perspective, you are in dodgy area under your legal duties under the CDM Regs.



    Viewed in a different light, conservatory design and installation is all an unregulated area of work. Which means anything goes, and toughened glass roofs will be installed in many instances. Since everything is unregulated the consumer is giving conservatory companies a free habnd to do as they please. Unless of course they manage and control this, and face up to their legal duties. It seems you fell short here.
    Originally posted by Furts

    Contrary to your comments not only am i NOT blaming any installers but i am always recommending them. I cant fault the company at all.
    Last edited by 3card; 09-07-2018 at 4:55 PM.
    • Furts
    • By Furts 9th Jul 18, 6:59 PM
    • 4,384 Posts
    • 2,838 Thanks
    Furts
    • #7
    • 9th Jul 18, 6:59 PM
    • #7
    • 9th Jul 18, 6:59 PM
    Contrary to your comments not only am i NOT blaming any installers but i am always recommending them. I cant fault the company at all.
    Originally posted by 3card

    The current hot spell is showing up weakness and bad workmanship with conservatory construction. Just like with your example the glazed units on roofs are failing. Bad workmanship and poor practice are culprits. To this one adds the wider question of why toughened glass was ever used in these roofs. Such use is folly.


    It bewilders me that when such points are made consumers still recommend the company that installed their defective conservatory. This is doing no favours to genuine consumers who genuinely care about seeking a genuine company.
    • Frank99
    • By Frank99 9th Jul 18, 7:20 PM
    • 105 Posts
    • 15 Thanks
    Frank99
    • #8
    • 9th Jul 18, 7:20 PM
    • #8
    • 9th Jul 18, 7:20 PM
    I'm surprised to hear this, my conservatory is being replaced and according to the fitters my old glass was not toughened which set alarm bells ringing.
    They told me it is against safety regulations to install non-toughened glass on a conservatory roof in case a tile came down or something which makes sense really, i suppose there is no way of knowing if it's toughened unless the worst happens and many rouge Companies can take advantage of this.
    Enjoy everyday like it's your last!
    • Ruski
    • By Ruski 9th Jul 18, 7:30 PM
    • 1,561 Posts
    • 913 Thanks
    Ruski
    • #9
    • 9th Jul 18, 7:30 PM
    • #9
    • 9th Jul 18, 7:30 PM
    To this one adds the wider question of why toughened glass was ever used in these roofs. Such use is folly.
    Originally posted by Furts
    Sorry Furts, but I'd rather have a million pieces of glass rain down on me than a couple of jagged sheets ala "The hand that rocks the cradle"

    'Tis not folly to use toughened glass - it's 'standard'.

    Even the market leader only specifies Laminated glass as a 'Security' measure - not a safety measure - safely is toughened!

    HTH

    Russ
    Perfection takes time: don't expect miracles in a day
    • that
    • By that 9th Jul 18, 7:33 PM
    • 293 Posts
    • 162 Thanks
    that
    Why not get plastic sheet, though it may cut down the UV to the plants. Do think polycarbonate degrades with uv and looses its strength, unless you find and outside variant or laminate

    Acrylic is more uv resistant, but not as strong. The polycab rectangular sheet, one used for roofs is rated about 10 years.
    Last edited by that; 09-07-2018 at 7:41 PM.
    • Furts
    • By Furts 9th Jul 18, 7:49 PM
    • 4,384 Posts
    • 2,838 Thanks
    Furts
    Sorry Furts, but I'd rather have a million pieces of glass rain down on me than a couple of jagged sheets ala "The hand that rocks the cradle"

    'Tis not folly to use toughened glass - it's 'standard'.

    Even the market leader only specifies Laminated glass as a 'Security' measure - not a safety measure - safely is toughened!

    HTH

    Russ
    Originally posted by Ruski

    Safety for a window or door can be toughened, it can equally be laminated. Here it is down to the consumer on what they specify. The conservatory industry take this further, Because they are an unregulated industry that make their own rules it is no surprise that toughened gets used. It is a good earner replacing the units! But consumers can specify laminated. It is simply a matter of how many care.



    As I type this I am sat under a large Velux window in my office. Needless to say this large Velux was specified and supplied with laminated glass. I have experienced moments when I am very pleased that such a decision was made! Were it toughened I suspect it would have been replaced a couple of times over recent years. Instead it is laminated and it has resisted impacts with no ill effects.
    • ytfcmad
    • By ytfcmad 9th Jul 18, 9:34 PM
    • 254 Posts
    • 112 Thanks
    ytfcmad
    I'm surprised to hear this, my conservatory is being replaced and according to the fitters my old glass was not toughened which set alarm bells ringing.
    They told me it is against safety regulations to install non-toughened glass on a conservatory roof in case a tile came down or something which makes sense really, i suppose there is no way of knowing if it's toughened unless the worst happens and many rouge Companies can take advantage of this.
    Originally posted by Frank99
    Its easy to tell if the glass is toughened.
    • Frank99
    • By Frank99 10th Jul 18, 3:53 PM
    • 105 Posts
    • 15 Thanks
    Frank99
    Its easy to tell if the glass is toughened.
    Originally posted by ytfcmad
    Well please elaborate, how?
    Enjoy everyday like it's your last!
    • ytfcmad
    • By ytfcmad 10th Jul 18, 4:36 PM
    • 254 Posts
    • 112 Thanks
    ytfcmad
    Well please elaborate, how?
    Originally posted by Frank99
    All toughened glass has a stamp on it, normally in the corner and normally round (similar to what you'd see on the glass in cars)

    If its a roof then either with a stepladder or a little pair of binoculars (sat in your conservatory) you should be able to see them.

    All toughened glass has to carry this stamp by law.

    Up until a number of years ago the DGU manufacturers used to place it as far into the corner of the DGU as possible, a lot of this was dictated by the Conservatory/Window companies because the end user complained about these stamps/marks showing on their nice new roof or windows.

    This meant that some glass that was actually toughened looked like it wasn't because the stamp was not visible once it was fitted in the frame.

    The rules were changed and the stamps now have to be a certain distance from the edge so they can be easily viewed etc.

    A good window company will make sure all the stamps are in the same place (when they make your windows) such as all bottom right etc etc.
    Last edited by ytfcmad; 10-07-2018 at 4:49 PM.
    • Frank99
    • By Frank99 11th Jul 18, 10:46 AM
    • 105 Posts
    • 15 Thanks
    Frank99
    All toughened glass has a stamp on it, normally in the corner and normally round (similar to what you'd see on the glass in cars)

    If its a roof then either with a stepladder or a little pair of binoculars (sat in your conservatory) you should be able to see them.

    All toughened glass has to carry this stamp by law.

    Up until a number of years ago the DGU manufacturers used to place it as far into the corner of the DGU as possible, a lot of this was dictated by the Conservatory/Window companies because the end user complained about these stamps/marks showing on their nice new roof or windows.

    This meant that some glass that was actually toughened looked like it wasn't because the stamp was not visible once it was fitted in the frame.

    The rules were changed and the stamps now have to be a certain distance from the edge so they can be easily viewed etc.

    A good window company will make sure all the stamps are in the same place (when they make your windows) such as all bottom right etc etc.
    Originally posted by ytfcmad
    Many thanks, i will be looking for that mark, i should have realised this as my door glass has small tyneside toughened stamps in the corners.
    Enjoy everyday like it's your last!
    • 3card
    • By 3card 12th Jul 18, 4:39 PM
    • 176 Posts
    • 64 Thanks
    3card
    Many thanks for most of the replies


    I was aware of the 'stamp' in the corners so I knew it was saying it was toughened.


    Yesterday I rang my home insurance company to check on my insurance for glass and I was told I was covered for glass breakage with a small excess. I rang the company that installed my conservatory to check the cost of the replacement unit and the fitting and I was informed that they wasn't going to charge me anything for the work or materials required so no need for a claim


    Thanks again
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