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    • Richard_RM
    • By Richard_RM 9th Jul 18, 9:43 AM
    • 14Posts
    • 4Thanks
    Richard_RM
    Planning Permission: 50% outbuildings rule
    • #1
    • 9th Jul 18, 9:43 AM
    Planning Permission: 50% outbuildings rule 9th Jul 18 at 9:43 AM
    My parents own a house that originally had a small garden but they have extended this considerably by buying a large part of their elderly neighbours garden. They now want to build some outbuildings but they are not sure about whether or not they need planning permission. The buildings they want will cover more than 50% of the original garden, but a lot less than 50% of the current total garden since they have extended it. The 50% rule around permissible development states that:


    No more than half the area of land around the "original house"* would be covered by additions or other buildings.
    *The term "original house" means the house as it was first built or as it stood on 1 July 1948 (if it was built before that date)


    To me this sounds like they need to apply for planning but they don't really want to if they don't have to. Has anyone else come across this situation before and if so how did you proceed?


    Thanks
Page 1
    • ronan01
    • By ronan01 9th Jul 18, 1:04 PM
    • 9 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    ronan01
    • #2
    • 9th Jul 18, 1:04 PM
    • #2
    • 9th Jul 18, 1:04 PM
    If you extend a boundary of your property then you need a planning permission and if your property is attached with neighbouring wall or their land then you might want to consider to get a party wall agreement as well. This will be advisable for you to at least communicate with the experts or local authorities to have a smooth extension. Good luck
    • stator
    • By stator 9th Jul 18, 4:26 PM
    • 6,381 Posts
    • 4,251 Thanks
    stator
    • #3
    • 9th Jul 18, 4:26 PM
    • #3
    • 9th Jul 18, 4:26 PM
    How far over the 50% will it take them?
    Will it affect the neighbours?
    Is someone likely to complain?

    Yes, they do need planning permission. But the council won't notice unless someone complains to them
    Changing the world, one sarcastic comment at a time.
    • bris
    • By bris 9th Jul 18, 4:46 PM
    • 7,729 Posts
    • 6,715 Thanks
    bris
    • #4
    • 9th Jul 18, 4:46 PM
    • #4
    • 9th Jul 18, 4:46 PM
    Speak to planning, you don't want to build then have to knock it down.
    • EachPenny
    • By EachPenny 9th Jul 18, 4:53 PM
    • 5,771 Posts
    • 15,311 Thanks
    EachPenny
    • #5
    • 9th Jul 18, 4:53 PM
    • #5
    • 9th Jul 18, 4:53 PM
    Yes, they do need planning permission. But the council won't notice unless someone complains to them
    Originally posted by stator
    Not having consent could cause the OP's parents significant problems when it comes to selling the property, this kind of thing isn't something to adopt a "see if you can get away with it" type approach on.
    "In the future, everyone will be rich for 15 minutes"
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