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  • FIRST POST
    • Cocketts
    • By Cocketts 7th Jul 18, 9:40 AM
    • 115Posts
    • 1,222Thanks
    Cocketts
    A Pot of Tea - and a Stamp!
    • #1
    • 7th Jul 18, 9:40 AM
    A Pot of Tea - and a Stamp! 7th Jul 18 at 9:40 AM
    I had my sister and her family visiting last weekend. In my efforts to reduce plastic usage Chez Lillibet, I have swapped tea bags for 'real tea'.
    I was amused when my 25-year old niece (whose turn it was to make the cuppas) admitted that she didn't know how to make tea in a pot!!

    I was then reminded of an incident about three weeks ago when my 22-year old daughter had to be told how to go the post office counter and ask for a first class stamp......

    These may not be 'important' skills to teach this generation but what else might they need to know - or do we assume they know?

    Correctly pegging out the washing on the line springs to mind!

    Lilli

    EDITED TO ADD: I'm not sure my daughter would know how to write a cheque either
    Last edited by Cocketts; 07-07-2018 at 9:44 AM.
Page 4
    • Out, Vile Jelly
    • By Out, Vile Jelly 10th Jul 18, 10:42 AM
    • 4,207 Posts
    • 14,302 Thanks
    Out, Vile Jelly
    To be fair, I was in my 30s when I discovered you could "make" rice pudding. I just thought it came from tins.

    I'm always surprised by the number of otherwise well educated and intelligent adults who think an oven is broken, when the clock just needs setting.
    They are an EYESORES!!!!
    • K80 Black
    • By K80 Black 10th Jul 18, 10:57 AM
    • 134 Posts
    • 379 Thanks
    K80 Black
    My little sister managed to get to University (a good one too!) before knowing what a tin opener was and how to use one. She bought some beans and then had to email asking 'erm... it doesn't have a ring pull, how do you open them?!', since we'd always had the ring-pull kind at home.
    • LameWolf
    • By LameWolf 10th Jul 18, 11:30 AM
    • 10,878 Posts
    • 119,659 Thanks
    LameWolf
    I'm guessing that most people use post codes to put into sat nav although you'd need more specific information to find an exact address. There are websites too where you can put in postcodes to plan journeys.
    Originally posted by maman
    Ah yes, of course.... thank you.
    I've never used a SatNav; I have used G00gle Maps on the pc (I don't have a smartphone), but I always input the first bit of the address to find the route.

    But reading a map - and trusting somebody to read a map for you - that's rarer now, as so many have been convinced that only Sat Nav can do it properly. Yeah, OK. Except for when you know it's near to milking time, that the stable marked a quarter of a mile down is probably taking kids out because it's half past 9 on a Saturday morning, that the street full of pubs on the day of an England match probably isn't a good idea to drive down - or when the mobile signal dies...
    Originally posted by Jojo the Tightfisted
    *Raises hand* We still use paper maps to find our way. Currently, the usual thing is for Mr LW to drive, and I sit with a printout of the route we've actually planned (see my comment above, replying to maman) and the trusty map book so that if we have to/choose to divert, I can get us back on track quickly.

    ETA: We also still have Micros0ft's Autoroute 2005 software.
    Last edited by LameWolf; 10-07-2018 at 11:33 AM.
    LameWolf
    If your dog thinks you're the best, don't seek a second opinion.
    • Hopeless Case
    • By Hopeless Case 10th Jul 18, 11:58 AM
    • 888 Posts
    • 5,334 Thanks
    Hopeless Case
    SatNav is a bugbear of my OH, although he uses it himself, but it's when people totally rely on it and don't have any sort of mental map of where they are going, which I guess he got in 20 years of travelling the country using maps! I suppose he feels you should still look at the route on a map, albeit google maps, and get an understanding of where you're going, rather than just 'take the third exit at the roundabout' and end up in a field

    The funniest one we had was when we drove in France but didn't have the European maps on the SatNav - we did have a paper map, but the SatNav kept piping up with helpful advice like 'In 25 miles keep left'


    My mum always made rice pudding from scratch but we never had semolina, and my OH introduced me to tinned semolina, and then at some point many years later, I had a light bulb moment and realised that it must be possible to make that too
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    • Savvy_Sue
    • By Savvy_Sue 10th Jul 18, 1:37 PM
    • 39,186 Posts
    • 36,101 Thanks
    Savvy_Sue
    What the heck is a 'duke box'?
    Originally posted by pollypenny
    Juke box? I'm guessing ...
    Still knitting!
    Completed: 1 adult cardigan, 3 baby jumpers, 3 shawls, 1 sweat band, 3 pairs baby bootees,
    1 Wise Man Knitivity figure + 1 sheep, 2 pairs socks, 2 hats, 2 balaclavas for seamen, 1 balaclava for myself, multiple poppies, 3 peony flowers, 4 butterflies ...
    Current projects: ready to decrease / decreasing on all parts of the mohair cardigan pattern!
    • littlegreenparrot
    • By littlegreenparrot 10th Jul 18, 3:31 PM
    • 260 Posts
    • 1,681 Thanks
    littlegreenparrot
    I remember having a moment of clarity in my late teens when I realised people could make pastry from scratch.
    It had genuinely never occurred to me that it didn't just come out of the freezer!
    • purpleivy
    • By purpleivy 10th Jul 18, 3:54 PM
    • 3,401 Posts
    • 20,760 Thanks
    purpleivy
    Agree to all the above.Would like to add washing up instead of a dish washer,cooking in general,and mopping a floor with mop and bucket.Witnessed my 16 year old mopping the floor the other day!She just randomly jabbed the floor with a sopping mop,and she mops the floor at work in a cafe!
    Originally posted by vulpix

    My daughter is a Guide Leader. Sometime ago she heard the girls clearing up in the kitchen, discussing how they had learned to wash up at Brownies! They didn't know the right cloth to use for which job or how to use a peeler.

    Mind you, she got very frustrated to find her friend using a teatowel to mop up beer!
    "Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad"
    Trying not to waste food!
    • Callie22
    • By Callie22 10th Jul 18, 6:27 PM
    • 3,217 Posts
    • 8,796 Thanks
    Callie22
    My little sister managed to get to University (a good one too!) before knowing what a tin opener was and how to use one. She bought some beans and then had to email asking 'erm... it doesn't have a ring pull, how do you open them?!', since we'd always had the ring-pull kind at home.
    Originally posted by K80 Black

    My brother once asked me 'how do you know when toast is done?' I have to admit I was a bit stumped at that one as it just is!
    • Slinky
    • By Slinky 10th Jul 18, 7:17 PM
    • 5,587 Posts
    • 26,244 Thanks
    Slinky
    I'm always astonished when I read about people not able to use a washing machine. Most of them seem to have come from homes where 'somebody' did the washing, but they've never paid any attention to it. I grew up in a house without a machine and everything was washed by hand. When I finally got my hands on my own machine, it wasn't rocket science working out how they work!
    • GreyQueen
    • By GreyQueen 10th Jul 18, 8:27 PM
    • 12,226 Posts
    • 235,349 Thanks
    GreyQueen
    It's their future housemates/ partners I feel sorry for. Even in the 1980s when I was in flatshares, there were some folk who'd had Mummy (or Mummy and the daily help) do everything for them and they were beyond clueless and flipping annoying to share living quarters with.


    Parents, don't condemn your offspring to unpopularity, housetrain them before they reach puberty, the world will thank you for it!
    Every increased possession loads us with a new weariness.
    John Ruskin
    Veni, vidi, eradici
    (I came, I saw, I kondo'd)

    • monnagran
    • By monnagran 10th Jul 18, 10:14 PM
    • 4,015 Posts
    • 54,247 Thanks
    monnagran
    When I went to Teacher Training College in the mid 50s we had a lot of girls who had come from the top public schools. Obviously they came from very wealthy families and had absolutely nothing to do with life below stairs. To say they didn't know how to boil an egg was putting it mildly. I swear some of them had never picked up a saucepan in anger.

    We lower orders coming from home and grammar schools spent a lot of time teaching them a few domestic skills.
    They were fascinated by our economies. One girl actually asked how much grant we got. When we told her she was horrified and said that she spent more than that on perfume and how did we make it last a week. When we told her it had to last a whole term she almost passed out.

    We returned to our demonstration of how to scramble an egg. I often wondered how she managed on a teacher's salary. 29 a month when we first qualified, typists earned more.
    I believe that friends are quiet angels
    Who lift us to our feet when our wings
    Have trouble remembering how to fly.
    • shanks77
    • By shanks77 11th Jul 18, 4:25 AM
    • 1,136 Posts
    • 10,811 Thanks
    shanks77
    I've found that younger people in an office don't know that when telephoning a local number on a landline you don't need the area code because they have only made calls on a mobile where you need the area code, so they keep keying in the area code for local calls on a landline every time.

    Predicting the weather from looking at the clouds instead of using an app.

    Not just building and cooking on the fire, but also identifying the variety of tree your logs came from.
    Originally posted by m1kjm
    I'm in the NE Scotland and here you DO HAVE to put in the area code even if it's a local number
    • Hopeless Case
    • By Hopeless Case 11th Jul 18, 7:10 AM
    • 888 Posts
    • 5,334 Thanks
    Hopeless Case
    I'm in the NE Scotland and here you DO HAVE to put in the area code even if it's a local number
    Originally posted by shanks77
    Ooh you learn something new every day!

    We do still have a landline but it's mainly there for the broadband and to be honest even if our (adult) kids used it, they'd probably be ringing other mobiles so the area code thing wouldn't apply!

    Didn't it used to be that if you typed in the area code in even for a local call you got charged the national not the local price? But I expect that's all gone now?

    it's so long since i dialled out on our home phone that I'd probably put the area code in too to be honest!
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    • whmf00001
    • By whmf00001 11th Jul 18, 11:32 AM
    • 241 Posts
    • 1,256 Thanks
    whmf00001
    I have had to show 3 different cleaners how to put double sheets on the bed, the "band" at the top or bottom as sheets are not square, also taught friend to hang washing and told GS that kettles - electric - never used to turn off by themselves. I also use 2 sheets on my bed one on the bottom and the other on top with duvet on top of that, no need to wash duvet every time, same as 2 sheets, and also change bottom sheet each week, put top sheet "body" side onto bottom and fresh sheet on top so use both sides of sheet before washing but thats just me. Yes I do do knitting/crochet/cross stitch etc etc and although never used an old mincer (on side of table) but knew how. Am 74 but love microwave/breadmaker/slow cooker/soupmaker/halogen etc so we can all learn but best not to forget.
    • DigForVictory
    • By DigForVictory 11th Jul 18, 12:00 PM
    • 8,328 Posts
    • 26,139 Thanks
    DigForVictory
    Mind you, she got very frustrated to find her friend using a teatowel to mop up beer!
    Originally posted by purpleivy
    Enlighten my darkness - what is the correct thing with which to mop beer?
    I have sons, beers is on the event horizon, but the idea that there is a correct tool intrigues me. Currently, House Rules are you spill it, you remove your T shirt & mop with that - or (if it's a particularly cherished T shirt) you fetch a less loved/nearly outgrown one.
    Guests have looked a tad aghast but are usually handed something from the rag bin. Swiftly.
    • Hopeless Case
    • By Hopeless Case 11th Jul 18, 1:32 PM
    • 888 Posts
    • 5,334 Thanks
    Hopeless Case
    I have had to show 3 different cleaners how to put double sheets on the bed, the "band" at the top or bottom as sheets are not square, also taught friend to hang washing and told GS that kettles - electric - never used to turn off by themselves. I also use 2 sheets on my bed one on the bottom and the other on top with duvet on top of that, no need to wash duvet every time, same as 2 sheets, and also change bottom sheet each week, put top sheet "body" side onto bottom and fresh sheet on top so use both sides of sheet before washing but thats just me. Yes I do do knitting/crochet/cross stitch etc etc and although never used an old mincer (on side of table) but knew how. Am 74 but love microwave/breadmaker/slow cooker/soupmaker/halogen etc so we can all learn but best not to forget.
    Originally posted by whmf00001
    My mum used to move the top sheet to the bottom when she changed the beds, and put a fresh top sheet on. I can't remember if she turned it over though. Must confess I only have fitted sheets now, duvets changed the world for me

    She also used to have a great heavy mincer which attached to the side of the work top (this was in the 70s), I think it was hard graft using it, another thing which has changed for the better in my opinion!

    Thinking of the old kettles which you had to turn off, I've just started turning my microwave off at the wall when not in use (and not using it as a clock/timer) and I've got a little battery operated timer, and I still struggle to remember that it won't just bleep a couple of times like the microwave, it'll keep going til I turn it off or the battery runs out! Caught me out a few times
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    • spadoosh
    • By spadoosh 11th Jul 18, 1:38 PM
    • 5,748 Posts
    • 7,893 Thanks
    spadoosh
    Enlighten my darkness - what is the correct thing with which to mop beer?
    .
    Originally posted by DigForVictory
    Your mouth? What else do people use?
    Don't be angry!
    • chickadee
    • By chickadee 11th Jul 18, 1:39 PM
    • 1,431 Posts
    • 5,486 Thanks
    chickadee
    My son and his friends lived in a shared house in their last year at university. One day he mentioned that his friend's room was cold because only half of his radiator was working. I explained that it needed bleeding to remove the air and fill it up again so it would get hot at the top. I told him how to do it and then mentioned that he'd need to check whether or not the boiler needed to be topped up as well because the pressure might have dropped. He just asked how on earth I knew this stuff! I think he'd have called a plumber. The thing is, I don't remember even being shown this, I have no idea how I have accumulated this knowledge. I suppose it is about life experience at the end of the day, it is surprising the things we just pick up along the way.
    Sealed Pot Challenge #8 341.90
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    • LameWolf
    • By LameWolf 13th Jul 18, 11:44 AM
    • 10,878 Posts
    • 119,659 Thanks
    LameWolf
    Enlighten my darkness - what is the correct thing with which to mop beer?
    I have sons, beers is on the event horizon, but the idea that there is a correct tool intrigues me. Currently, House Rules are you spill it, you remove your T shirt & mop with that - or (if it's a particularly cherished T shirt) you fetch a less loved/nearly outgrown one.
    Guests have looked a tad aghast but are usually handed something from the rag bin. Swiftly.
    Originally posted by DigForVictory
    Does the "remove your t-shirt and use it to mop" rule also apply to ladies?
    I'd grab the dish-cloth and use that for the main spillage, then for the last bit (ie drying the table), I have a bar-towel that lives on the back of the kitchen chair.
    LameWolf
    If your dog thinks you're the best, don't seek a second opinion.
    • maman
    • By maman 13th Jul 18, 12:52 PM
    • 18,733 Posts
    • 111,880 Thanks
    maman
    I'm in the NE Scotland and here you DO HAVE to put in the area code even if it's a local number
    Originally posted by shanks77

    In my area, people confuse what's the area code and what's digits added to original landline numbers.


    So (using fictitious numbers so please don't call in case it exists)


    Old Number: O1707 558912
    New Number: 02580558912


    People assume that 02580 is the area code replacing the old 01707.


    It's not. The area code is 025, the number is 80558912
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