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  • FIRST POST
    • Cocketts
    • By Cocketts 7th Jul 18, 9:40 AM
    • 57Posts
    • 918Thanks
    Cocketts
    A Pot of Tea - and a Stamp!
    • #1
    • 7th Jul 18, 9:40 AM
    A Pot of Tea - and a Stamp! 7th Jul 18 at 9:40 AM
    I had my sister and her family visiting last weekend. In my efforts to reduce plastic usage Chez Lillibet, I have swapped tea bags for 'real tea'.
    I was amused when my 25-year old niece (whose turn it was to make the cuppas) admitted that she didn't know how to make tea in a pot!!

    I was then reminded of an incident about three weeks ago when my 22-year old daughter had to be told how to go the post office counter and ask for a first class stamp......

    These may not be 'important' skills to teach this generation but what else might they need to know - or do we assume they know?

    Correctly pegging out the washing on the line springs to mind!

    Lilli

    EDITED TO ADD: I'm not sure my daughter would know how to write a cheque either
    Last edited by Cocketts; 07-07-2018 at 9:44 AM.
Page 3
    • MrsLurcherwalker
    • By MrsLurcherwalker 9th Jul 18, 1:42 PM
    • 12,112 Posts
    • 167,969 Thanks
    MrsLurcherwalker
    It's a cross generational thing not being bothered or able to do what our parents and grandparents did as a matter of course, I picked up some YS veg in the local shop early in the year and when I got to the check out the lady serving me (who must have been in her 50s) said 'what are you going to do with all that lot?' so I said make soup, we eat soup for our lunch most days in the colder weather and I make it in big batches. She looked at me like a specimen on a slide under a microscope, frowned and said 'Why? I just open a tin!'. So it's not just the under 40s who haven't got the skills or drive to do things is it?
    Thumpers mum was right - if you can't find anything nice to say don't say anything at all!
    • nursemaggie
    • By nursemaggie 9th Jul 18, 2:46 PM
    • 2,317 Posts
    • 30,708 Thanks
    nursemaggie
    Too right Mrs LW even some older people would not know how go about making soup. I don't even remember my mum making soup. They just do not realise how cheap it is to make and how much better it tastes.
    • spadoosh
    • By spadoosh 9th Jul 18, 3:27 PM
    • 5,280 Posts
    • 7,182 Thanks
    spadoosh
    Thread like this do my tits in.

    When i was 22 i took the mick out of an 18 year old girl who asked me how to make a coffee (i obviously showed her how). That 18 year old girl now performs life saving surgery on people. I dont think she'll make many coffees.

    Then there was another guy i worked with. 'Slow Tom' he was called, generally considered to have a lack of common sense. Currently living in a multi million pound apartment in dubai, some kind of economic forecaster or something earning silly money.

    Then theres me, the ultimate (im that arrogant) in the 21st century man. Can do diy, gardening, cooking and cleaning, i can do most things. Jack of all as they say. It used to frustrate me that they didnt seem bothered about learning these most basic skills. Well, i got shown, im certain i make more coffee than them. Whose the simpleton?
    Don't be angry!
    • maman
    • By maman 9th Jul 18, 4:03 PM
    • 18,064 Posts
    • 108,127 Thanks
    maman
    I suppose it's interesting to reminisce on things that used to be essential skills that have fallen out of fashion.

    Personally I feel frustrated by the opposite attitudes that I sometimes see in older people.


    My BIL, for example, loves to boast that he doesn't 'do technology'. Then he expects the younger members of his family to book him flights and hotels online.
    • LameWolf
    • By LameWolf 9th Jul 18, 4:10 PM
    • 10,644 Posts
    • 116,773 Thanks
    LameWolf
    Last week I was inviting candidates for an interview and one of them asked me how to get to the office, I gave him the postcode and he proceeded to tell me he knew where it was but needed to know the bus route. Seriously???
    Originally posted by JessyRM
    Hmm - I have to confess to being a little unsure how a postcode on it's own helps? Though presumably he also knows the road name, yes?
    LameWolf
    If your dog thinks you're the best, don't seek a second opinion.
    • maman
    • By maman 9th Jul 18, 4:57 PM
    • 18,064 Posts
    • 108,127 Thanks
    maman
    Hmm - I have to confess to being a little unsure how a postcode on it's own helps? Though presumably he also knows the road name, yes?
    Originally posted by LameWolf

    I'm guessing that most people use post codes to put into sat nav although you'd need more specific information to find an exact address. There are websites too where you can put in postcodes to plan journeys.


    I think w could argue forever about which life skills are needed, most important etc. The world is changing and we need to be able to adapt. Skills that are essential now won't be in a few years time. To be able to adapt we need to embrace change and willing to learn. Although I think we do need to guard against throwing babies out with bath water.
    Last edited by maman; 09-07-2018 at 4:59 PM.
    • Hopeless Case
    • By Hopeless Case 9th Jul 18, 5:22 PM
    • 489 Posts
    • 2,581 Thanks
    Hopeless Case
    It's a cross generational thing not being bothered or able to do what our parents and grandparents did as a matter of course, I picked up some YS veg in the local shop early in the year and when I got to the check out the lady serving me (who must have been in her 50s) said 'what are you going to do with all that lot?' so I said make soup, we eat soup for our lunch most days in the colder weather and I make it in big batches. She looked at me like a specimen on a slide under a microscope, frowned and said 'Why? I just open a tin!'. So it's not just the under 40s who haven't got the skills or drive to do things is it?
    Originally posted by MrsLurcherwalker
    This is true for me, I was brought up on tinned soup even though my mum was a very good cook who made nearly everything else herself from scratch, but for some reason she didn't 'do' soup.

    Then when my daughter went to uni and had no money, she started making vegetable soup as it's cheap and filling, and I got the habit. To be fair, she had my old blender and my mum didn't have one at all so it would have been harder, although she could have done chopped chunky soups

    I don't think people are stupid nowadays, but the level of wastage and packaging alarms me - the idea of throwing clothes away because you can't sew on a button is terrible, and I went down the jelly aisle for the first time in years recently - the overwhelming majority of the jelly on sale was pre-made in plastic pots, and the thought of all of those pots being thrown away every week distressed me. I do realise that my grandmother probably had to boil gelatine and puree fruit to make jelly though, so the idea of pouring boiling water on cubes would have seemed odd and maybe lazy to her!

    Someone on a local Facebook group genuinely said they were scared of hanging their washing out (I'm not sure what they thought would happen) during a discussion in which the majority relied totally on their tumble drier, and the dependence on appliances and non renewable energy scares me for the future
    June GC 218.09/ 300; July GC Target 250 -177.79/ 72.21
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    • Lydia42
    • By Lydia42 9th Jul 18, 5:39 PM
    • 37 Posts
    • 115 Thanks
    Lydia42
    My DS kindly did me poached eggs on toast for my birthday (he's 11). He loves to cook and is actually very good at it. Having seen me use the egg poacher a number of times he hadn't actually seen me put water into the bottom of it.......boy what a smell and job it was to get the egg out of the holders.
    • THIRZAH
    • By THIRZAH 9th Jul 18, 5:39 PM
    • 1,379 Posts
    • 7,004 Thanks
    THIRZAH
    I was born in 1955 and the only jelly available was the cube sort. My mother cooked most things from scratch but I doubt if she could have bought gelatine in our local shops. On the rare occasions we had soup it came from a tin and later from a packet. I don't remember any of my friends mothers making soup from scratch
    • GreyQueen
    • By GreyQueen 9th Jul 18, 6:34 PM
    • 11,978 Posts
    • 231,073 Thanks
    GreyQueen
    The cynic in me would wonder if this was maybe a ploy so that they never got asked to do it again.
    Originally posted by LameWolf
    Their 'rents weren't even in the room, just me working at the sink opposite.

    I considered myself a young 'un until not so long ago but i' m aware the gap is very much there.

    It dawned on my then that our world is moving extremely fast. I'm 38 and of the technological age but very much being left behind.
    Originally posted by fuddle
    I'm not quite old enough to be fuddle's mother (well, biologically I'm old enough but I would have had to lead a different teenaged life to the one I did have) but I've been finding this for some time.


    It's the little things like a casual remark from the hipster toyboy (a platonic male pal in his mid-twenties) that I and one other person are the only people he texts with, everyone else is snapchatting........ little things like that are those moments when you feel old f*rtdom beckoning.

    What to do? It isn't possible to be up on every single thing in a fast-changing world and you run the real risk of being that tragic figure who doesn't know that, like, they're actually too old, y'know? Like a geezer I met once at a bus stop, who was a white cockney pensioner but was dressed and throwing poses, guestures and slang like a teen black lad from an inner London borough. And yes, it did come across just as ridiculous as it sounds.


    One can have as much fun giggling at yoof as they can giggling at the wrinkies, but we can all learn from each other in different ways.


    It sometimes serves my interest to pretend not to know how to do something or what something is. I probably do know, or could find out in under five minutes, but a pretense of gullibility is sometimes useful when pulling a fast one on the youngsters. My brain isn't compromised by my white hairs - yet!



    Face it, young people, I'm more than twice your age and far more devious than you'd ever credit..........
    Every increased possession loads us with a new weariness.
    John Ruskin
    Veni, vidi, eradici
    (I came, I saw, I kondo'd)

    • Woodsider55
    • By Woodsider55 9th Jul 18, 7:52 PM
    • 1 Posts
    • 10 Thanks
    Woodsider55
    I was watching a young girl trying to use the Search option on a duke box. She knew the band name but couldn't seem to find the letters.

    Then I realised that the letters were in alphabetical order, she obviously could use a qwerty keyboard and was totally puzzled when as she said , the letters are wrong!
    • Savvy_Sue
    • By Savvy_Sue 9th Jul 18, 10:38 PM
    • 38,731 Posts
    • 35,515 Thanks
    Savvy_Sue
    I learned another 'wrinkle' from DH this morning. I had a screw to unscrew to change a battery, only the screw was b*ggered and the screwdriver just turned without engaging. "Have you got a bit of blu-tak?" he asked.

    I won't say it was an easy task, and I don't know how much the blu-tak helped, but I'd never heard of that, although it makes sense!
    Still knitting!
    Completed: 1 adult cardigan, 3 baby jumpers, 3 shawls, 1 sweat band, 3 pairs baby bootees,
    1 Wise Man Knitivity figure + 1 sheep, 2 pairs socks, 2 hats 2 balaclavas for seamen, 1 balaclava for myself ...
    Current projects: Poppies, mohair cardigan pattern arrived and going strong!
    • Jojo the Tightfisted
    • By Jojo the Tightfisted 10th Jul 18, 12:06 AM
    • 24,509 Posts
    • 97,276 Thanks
    Jojo the Tightfisted
    I taught my nephews the 'proper' way to hang washing hang tops from the bottom and bottoms from the top and my sister puts her washing on the line

    Reading a washing label on clothes a couple of us were teaching the young guys in the office last week that those weird symbols meant something

    changing a electric plug, although to be honest I'm not sure the last time i did one.

    Reading a map
    Originally posted by Brambling
    i told a kid who was baffled by the symbols that they were a sort of emoji for what to do.

    Instant comprehension.

    Haven't needed to change a plug for years, as they're mostly premoulded ones these days.

    But reading a map - and trusting somebody to read a map for you - that's rarer now, as so many have been convinced that only Sat Nav can do it properly. Yeah, OK. Except for when you know it's near to milking time, that the stable marked a quarter of a mile down is probably taking kids out because it's half past 9 on a Saturday morning, that the street full of pubs on the day of an England match probably isn't a good idea to drive down - or when the mobile signal dies...
    I could dream to wide extremes, I could do or die: I could yawn and be withdrawn and watch the world go by.

    Yup you are officially Rock n Roll
    Originally posted by colinw
    • Sayschezza
    • By Sayschezza 10th Jul 18, 1:06 AM
    • 278 Posts
    • 2,513 Thanks
    Sayschezza
    I love it when non knitters pick up a knitting pattern I am using and try to decipher it.
    • Hopeless Case
    • By Hopeless Case 10th Jul 18, 8:03 AM
    • 489 Posts
    • 2,581 Thanks
    Hopeless Case
    I was born in 1955 and the only jelly available was the cube sort. My mother cooked most things from scratch but I doubt if she could have bought gelatine in our local shops. On the rare occasions we had soup it came from a tin and later from a packet. I don't remember any of my friends mothers making soup from scratch
    Originally posted by THIRZAH
    I don't know when cubed jelly came in to be fair - my grandmother was born in 1914.

    I guess soup was one of the things like bread which made life hugely easier when you could buy them ready made, and blenders have now made them easier again. We didn't have soup very often either, enough tins for 5 people would have been pricey! Home made soup for lunch, batch cooked and frozen makes my life so much easier but I do rely on my blender and freezer
    June GC 218.09/ 300; July GC Target 250 -177.79/ 72.21
    July NSD target 7/10
    July Bring Your Lunch to Work Target 8/13
    Buy a used car/ get out of PCP cycle fund 600/2400
    Cashback YTD 3.05/ claims 'on ice' for 7.50 untracked cashback
    • THIRZAH
    • By THIRZAH 10th Jul 18, 8:58 AM
    • 1,379 Posts
    • 7,004 Thanks
    THIRZAH
    I did wonder if not making soup was a kind of reaction to the years of rationing when people had to stretch their rations and perhaps made a lot of soup and stews? I know we were almost encouraged to put butter on vegetables such as cabbage-something that would have been impossible a few years earlier.


    We didn't have soup very often either. My family ran a nursery garden and small farm so we had our main meal at lunch time then a high tea in the early evening usually something like sausages, beans on toast or salad in the summer with lots of bread and butter then cake.
    • pollypenny
    • By pollypenny 10th Jul 18, 9:12 AM
    • 24,203 Posts
    • 63,184 Thanks
    pollypenny
    I was watching a young girl trying to use the Search option on a duke box. She knew the band name but couldn't seem to find the letters.

    Then I realised that the letters were in alphabetical order, she obviously could use a qwerty keyboard and was totally puzzled when as she said , the letters are wrong!
    Originally posted by Woodsider55


    What the heck is a 'duke box'?
    Member #14 of SKI-ers club

    Words, words, they're all we have to go by!.

    (Pity they are mangled by this autocorrect!)
    • vulpix
    • By vulpix 10th Jul 18, 9:21 AM
    • 868 Posts
    • 15,908 Thanks
    vulpix
    I agree Thirzah. My parents had been children during the war and after rationing embraced new time saving food preparation.I was brought up on Smash,Vesta chowmein,tinned soup and the like. I also had as many sweets as I wanted.My Mum still chooses not to cook. I once an adult have completed the circle and gone back to food preparation.My children who are young adults also cook.There is no comparison in taste.

    I also agree that some skills are redundant in todays world but many are transferable. I think technology can make people lazy thinkers. If it's not instantaneous it's too hard.We called it bridge building at the school I worked at,where one experience is similar and can give you an insight to how a problem can be solved.Children seem to not be encouraged to think or experience things because of the perceived risk,the mess or getting dirty.Not just at school but also at home.
    Last edited by vulpix; 10-07-2018 at 9:24 AM.
    • Prinzessilein
    • By Prinzessilein 10th Jul 18, 9:22 AM
    • 2,333 Posts
    • 10,846 Thanks
    Prinzessilein
    I was born in the early 60s.

    Soup and stew was a staple part of our diet - and almost always home made.

    The soups were always of the thick-and-hearty variety...pea soup made with a ham bone if Mum could get one (or with some spam cut up into it if no bone was available)...the most awesome chicken soup, made with the bones and giblets of the Sunday roast, and thickened with rice...and a potato, onion and minced beef concoction that was50% soup, 50 % stew and 100% delicious.

    On very rare occasions we would have a tin of Heinz soup ...and it was nowhere near as satisfying and filling as homemade soup...Mum's soup made a main meal...a tin of Heinz was a lunch!

    There was always cake at home - again home baked....Bread would be a mix of home baked and shop bought (With up to 5 children at home at one time, we got through a LOT of bread!)

    I still love home made soup, bread and cakes...but have to admit that modern gadgets are now in use!..I love my soup maker...and have a bread maker....cakes are still baked in an oven (mostly)!!!8230;.I have a number of disabilities and modern tech means I can still enjoy home cooking.

    As far as knitting/crochet goes...I sometimes go with Mum to a crafting coffee morning...I am one of the youngest there most of the time....however there have been a number of younger people turning up and asking for help in learning toknit/use a sewing machine...and a few young girls from a local school are booked to come during the holidays to learn how to do some basics (aged between 9 and 12....summer workshop will include choices such as knitting a simple bag, knitting a basic teddy, making a dress for a doll, making cards, and cross-stitching book marks)...so some younger people are at least keen to learn the 'old' skills!
    • happyandcontented
    • By happyandcontented 10th Jul 18, 9:35 AM
    • 1,142 Posts
    • 2,206 Thanks
    happyandcontented
    Re telling the time using only digital means rather than analogue, during GCSE exams recently we had to put up a digital clock on a screen in each room This was because a good number of students could not work out timings for exam questions using the clock on the wall as they couldn't tell the time with it! That came to light after mocks when they complained that they had no idea how long they had spent on specific questions!
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