Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@. Skimlinks & other affiliated links are turned on

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • JohnB47
    • By JohnB47 5th Jul 18, 5:35 PM
    • 1,136Posts
    • 370Thanks
    JohnB47
    Name this roof part?
    • #1
    • 5th Jul 18, 5:35 PM
    Name this roof part? 5th Jul 18 at 5:35 PM
    A recent post reminded me to ask this question. It'll need some explaining to understand what I mean.

    OK, ours is one half of a semi, with a standard pitched roof and a straight-up gable end wall.

    The parts I'm interested in are the pieces of wood that follow the line of the brickwork, at the top of the gable end and that are supported by the ends of purlins which protrude through the brickwork.

    These pieces are well rotted - particularly near the top. I'm just curious about the name for them? Gable end rafters?

    The roof itself is clay (terra cotta) tiles and the house was built in 1930. It is in general good repair but there are a few tiles broken in half horizontally.

    We'll probably decide to get it completely redone at some point and will have a decision to make - redo using similar tiles or go for the fibre cement type (is that standard now?.
Page 1
    • ceredigion
    • By ceredigion 5th Jul 18, 6:15 PM
    • 2,887 Posts
    • 3,931 Thanks
    ceredigion
    • #2
    • 5th Jul 18, 6:15 PM
    • #2
    • 5th Jul 18, 6:15 PM
    Barge boards
    • JohnB47
    • By JohnB47 5th Jul 18, 7:55 PM
    • 1,136 Posts
    • 370 Thanks
    JohnB47
    • #3
    • 5th Jul 18, 7:55 PM
    • #3
    • 5th Jul 18, 7:55 PM
    Barge boards
    Originally posted by ceredigion
    And the same to you!

    Actually, I've looked that up on the interweb and the pictures all seem to show curved decorative wooden bits fitted to projections out from the front of a house.

    Mine isn't decorative, it seems more structural. Just a long piece of timber sitting on the purlin projections and painted.

    Still a barge board?
    • EssexExile
    • By EssexExile 5th Jul 18, 9:27 PM
    • 3,101 Posts
    • 2,176 Thanks
    EssexExile
    • #4
    • 5th Jul 18, 9:27 PM
    • #4
    • 5th Jul 18, 9:27 PM
    And the same to you!

    Actually, I've looked that up on the interweb and the pictures all seem to show curved decorative wooden bits fitted to projections out from the front of a house.

    Mine isn't decorative, it seems more structural. Just a long piece of timber sitting on the purlin projections and painted.

    Still a barge board?
    Originally posted by JohnB47
    Still barge boards. Look it up on Wiki.
    Tall, dark & handsome. Well two out of three ain't bad.
    • sevenhills
    • By sevenhills 5th Jul 18, 10:03 PM
    • 1,534 Posts
    • 569 Thanks
    sevenhills
    • #5
    • 5th Jul 18, 10:03 PM
    • #5
    • 5th Jul 18, 10:03 PM
    http://www.swishbp.co.uk/design/what-are-fascias/



    Fascia
    The fascia board is the long, straight board that runs along the lower edge of the roof. The fascia is fixed directly to the lower ends of the roof trusses and usually does all the work of supporting the lower edge of the bottom row of tiles. The fascia board also carries all the guttering.
    This is no mean feat, especially when it is raining hard. In a downpour the roof of a 3-bed semi could be washing several gallons of water per second into its gutters.
    Bargeboard
    This is the board that is used on the gable end of a house. The condition of the bargeboard can often make or break the look of a house, and over the years it has evolved into some very attractive shapes.
    Soffit
    The soffit board is tucked away under the fascia board. It is usually the board that you see most of from street level. The soffit can be ventilated to allow the flow of air into the roof area. Alternatively, ventilation can be provided over the top of the fascia board. Many people prefer the latter solution these days. Without adequate ventilation, condensation will form in the roof void increasing the risk of timber decay.

    • JohnB47
    • By JohnB47 6th Jul 18, 9:56 AM
    • 1,136 Posts
    • 370 Thanks
    JohnB47
    • #6
    • 6th Jul 18, 9:56 AM
    • #6
    • 6th Jul 18, 9:56 AM
    Fair enough. Barge board it is. Ta.
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

1,759Posts Today

7,098Users online

Martin's Twitter