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  • FIRST POST
    • itm2
    • By itm2 5th Jul 18, 12:12 PM
    • 717Posts
    • 151Thanks
    itm2
    Long-lasting waterproofing for brickwork?
    • #1
    • 5th Jul 18, 12:12 PM
    Long-lasting waterproofing for brickwork? 5th Jul 18 at 12:12 PM
    We've had an ongoing problem with leaks due to our brickwork becoming saturated during periods of heavy rainfall. We had the problem resolved about 10 years ago by having the main wall painted with some sort of waterproofing solution.
    The waterproofing now seems to have worn off (we've started getting the same leaks again) so we were thinking of doing the waterproofing ourselves as there's only one wall to be done.
    Can anyone recommend a solution/coating which will last a few years? I've been looking at Screwfixes's "NO NONSENSE WATER REPELLENT SEAL", which seems to be the right sort of thing, but I've read some feedback which suggests that it only lasts for a couple of years.
    Can anyone recommend something which is likely to last for a 3-5 years at least?
Page 1
    • Furts
    • By Furts 5th Jul 18, 12:23 PM
    • 4,450 Posts
    • 2,884 Thanks
    Furts
    • #2
    • 5th Jul 18, 12:23 PM
    • #2
    • 5th Jul 18, 12:23 PM
    Why, or how, is your wall becoming saturated? This needs thought, and ideally sorting, before you think about painting on sealers.
    • FreeBear
    • By FreeBear 5th Jul 18, 1:49 PM
    • 1,882 Posts
    • 2,706 Thanks
    FreeBear
    • #3
    • 5th Jul 18, 1:49 PM
    • #3
    • 5th Jul 18, 1:49 PM
    Why, or how, is your wall becoming saturated? This needs thought, and ideally sorting, before you think about painting on sealers.
    Originally posted by Furts
    Agreed. Blocked gutters, downpipes, and/or ineffective soakaways would be the first suspects. If the walls are getting saturated at floor level, then look outside to see if the DPC has been bridged. Consider installing a french drain if the external ground level is below the DPC.

    Sealing the brickwork will trap moisture in the walls, and come the winter, the water will freeze causing the bricks to spall. That said, with the warm weather we've had for the last couple of weeks, the bricks will have dried out a little. Although a rule of thumb says walls need one month per inch to dry fully.

    Modern cavity walls by design, shouldn't suffer from internal damp if the outer leaf gets soaking wet - if the damp is penetrating, then there are other problems that need resolving.
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    • itm2
    • By itm2 5th Jul 18, 3:02 PM
    • 717 Posts
    • 151 Thanks
    itm2
    • #4
    • 5th Jul 18, 3:02 PM
    • #4
    • 5th Jul 18, 3:02 PM
    The wall in question is one level up - in the middle section of a 1970s 3-storey townhouse. We have an extension at the rear, with a flat roof terrace on top. The wall in question is part of the original rear wall, and runs from the roof terrace to the roof tiling on the upper floor of the house.
    I had a number of builders and surveyors look at it over the years, each offering different but speculative theories. We've had the roof re-asphalted and paved, gutters and drains checked and cleared. The only thing to stop the leaks has been the waterproof coating. Hence the original question.
    Be grateful for any recommendations for an appropriate sealant, even if it's not an ideal fix, as we've spent years searching unsuccessfully for the root cause.
    • bobbymotors
    • By bobbymotors 5th Jul 18, 3:29 PM
    • 663 Posts
    • 947 Thanks
    bobbymotors
    • #5
    • 5th Jul 18, 3:29 PM
    • #5
    • 5th Jul 18, 3:29 PM
    Stormguard

    Its very expensive, but very good
    • itm2
    • By itm2 5th Jul 18, 5:12 PM
    • 717 Posts
    • 151 Thanks
    itm2
    • #6
    • 5th Jul 18, 5:12 PM
    • #6
    • 5th Jul 18, 5:12 PM
    Stormguard

    Its very expensive, but very good
    Originally posted by bobbymotors
    Is Stormguard intended for use on brick walls? It looks like the sort of thing you'd use to seal smaller surfaces.
    • bobbymotors
    • By bobbymotors 5th Jul 18, 7:57 PM
    • 663 Posts
    • 947 Thanks
    bobbymotors
    • #7
    • 5th Jul 18, 7:57 PM
    • #7
    • 5th Jul 18, 7:57 PM
    Is Stormguard intended for use on brick walls? It looks like the sort of thing you'd use to seal smaller surfaces.
    Originally posted by itm2
    sorry....STORMDRY

    my bad

    it's good stuff
    • itm2
    • By itm2 5th Jul 18, 10:09 PM
    • 717 Posts
    • 151 Thanks
    itm2
    • #8
    • 5th Jul 18, 10:09 PM
    • #8
    • 5th Jul 18, 10:09 PM
    sorry....STORMDRY

    my bad

    it's good stuff
    Originally posted by bobbymotors
    Wow - 120 for a 5L can. About 6x pricier than the Screwfix stuff I was looking at. If it's genuinely good for 25 years then it would indeed be worth it, but at that price it would be a bit of a gamble!
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