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    • MSE Sarah
    • By MSE Sarah 3rd Jul 18, 3:57 PM
    • 158Posts
    • 77Thanks
    MSE Sarah
    Money Moral Dilemma: My colleague is paid more to do the same job - what should I do?
    • #1
    • 3rd Jul 18, 3:57 PM
    Money Moral Dilemma: My colleague is paid more to do the same job - what should I do? 3rd Jul 18 at 3:57 PM
    This week's MoneySaver who wants advice asks...

    I just discovered my colleague is paid almost £5,000/yr more than me, yet we do exactly the same job and have similar levels of experience. Should I speak up?

    Unfortunately the MSE team can't always answer money moral dilemma questions as contributions are often emailed in or suggested in person. They are intended to be enjoyed as a point of debate and discussed at face value.

    If you haven't already, join the forum to reply!

    Got a money moral dilemma of your own? Suggest an MMD.

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Page 2
    • happyinflorida
    • By happyinflorida 4th Jul 18, 10:22 PM
    • 727 Posts
    • 610 Thanks
    happyinflorida
    Have they been in the job longer than you? Is that why?


    Or are one of you female and the other male? If the female's being paid less for doing exactly the same job, then you could try asking for a salary increase under the equal pay act for women, I think it was passed by Labour in 1970.
    • 19lottie82
    • By 19lottie82 5th Jul 18, 2:37 AM
    • 5,790 Posts
    • 8,696 Thanks
    19lottie82
    What should you do? Negotiate harder for a higher wage the next time you go for a job.
    • gaving7095
    • By gaving7095 5th Jul 18, 8:31 AM
    • 152 Posts
    • 120 Thanks
    gaving7095
    This is definitely not a moral dilemma but yes, I would ask for a raise.

    What I would NOT do is to mention, under any circumstances, that you know or think that your colleague is paid more.
    For starters, are you 100 % sure? As in, have seen a number of pay slips or salary bank deposits to confirm it? I very much doubt you have.
    Or is it just something which you either been told directly, or even just overheard?
    Revealing pay to a colleague is often against an employee code of conduct so "grassing up" somebody for doing so is, I think, highly unlikely to work in anybody's favour.

    Putting all else aside, if you've shown loyalty and hard work over a consistent period and especially if you know that you have made yourself indispensable to them (something I aim to do early on in any job), then there should be no harm in your asking for a raise.
    I recently did this for the first time after more than 20 years of working, across only 2 jobs, and I got what I wanted. I was inspired to do it after so long by (amongst other things) a few podcasts which I listen to.
    You should be prepared for both answers, "yes" or "no". Be very sure of what you will do in either case, even if it's nothing. Personally I am naturally pessimistic so planned for the worst, even though I put forward a very strong case for myself.

    People - everybody - should ask for a raise or ask that girl out or whatever else it may be that they want, more often in life.
    There's a reason why Donald Trump has had the success in business & got where he is, and I don't believe it has much at all to do with intelligence & it sure as hell isn't his looks :-)
    • peachyprice
    • By peachyprice 5th Jul 18, 9:14 AM
    • 19,912 Posts
    • 46,064 Thanks
    peachyprice
    Yes you have the right to be paid an equal basic salary for the same role or at the very least in the same banding / grade.
    Originally posted by kazt2006
    I hope this is sarcasm, because it's not true.
    Accept your past without regret, handle your present with confidence and face your future without fear
    • fibonarchie
    • By fibonarchie 5th Jul 18, 12:19 PM
    • 904 Posts
    • 1,559 Thanks
    fibonarchie
    If there's no obvious reason why they're paid more, the inequality should be addressed. How is another matter..


    Alas in this country we have employment laws but no professional body to actually enforce them, so it's always up to the employee themselves to take the employer to court or whatever, and not everyone has the means to do that, or even wants to go down that route.
    • Kynthia
    • By Kynthia 6th Jul 18, 12:42 AM
    • 5,349 Posts
    • 7,454 Thanks
    Kynthia
    If there's no obvious reason why they're paid more, the inequality should be addressed. How is another matter..


    Alas in this country we have employment laws but no professional body to actually enforce them, so it's always up to the employee themselves to take the employer to court or whatever, and not everyone has the means to do that, or even wants to go down that route.
    Originally posted by fibonarchie
    There's no justification for taking this to court unless the OP has evidence of illegal discrimination. There's nothing wrong with people being paid differently as long as it's not because of one of the protected characteristics in the Equalities Act.
    Don't listen to me, I'm no expert!
    • JayD
    • By JayD 6th Jul 18, 10:48 AM
    • 517 Posts
    • 326 Thanks
    JayD
    I would suggest you take the approach of why you deserve to be paid the same, and focus on your contributions, skills and work ethic etc, rather than any perceived unfairness in the pay deficit.
    Originally posted by Rubik



    I totally agree with Rubik.


    YES, SPEAK UP!


    But ask for your pay to be re-assessed based on YOUR value and only refer to the comparison deficit if all your positives are agreed but no pay adjustment is forthcoming.
    • Ningaloo
    • By Ningaloo 6th Jul 18, 12:29 PM
    • 145 Posts
    • 111 Thanks
    Ningaloo
    Yes speak up but try to take emotion out of it (easier said than done).

    Have your facts ready -
    List all your achievements.
    If you have out performed that individual get the proof.
    State what you want £

    Also look at other roles/employers. What are you worth elsewhere as another option is to get another job elsewhere.

    I know someone who was always getting a job elsewhere, would hand in his notice but was also ready to negotiate a better package to stay. He stayed 3 or more times and got promotions/pay rises to stay.

    This option doesn't always work but if your Employer does nt value you then another will.

    Good staff are hard to find and even harder to keep.
    Thank you to everyone who has helped me MoneySave
    • garth549
    • By garth549 6th Jul 18, 2:08 PM
    • 213 Posts
    • 86 Thanks
    garth549
    There can be a whole host of reasons why someone gets paid more! For example:

    Your jobs are probably not absolutely identical, they could have extra responsibilities that you're not aware of.

    They could be more willing to stay later and work extra hours, or be on call when needed.

    They might have been at the job longer or are more experienced.

    They might be more productive (ie they work faster and more efficiently than you)

    They're more crucial to the company (ie they'd be harder to replace than you)

    They've simply negotiated a higher wage


    I'm paid significantly more (>£15k) than my nearest colleague with the same job description. On the face of it it seems like we do similar jobs, however behind the scenes I'm responsible for all our network, technical infrastructure and backups, regularly work weekends when out-of-hours upgrades/modifications have to be done, almost never leave before 6pm (all my colleagues leave at 5 on the dot), have by far the best technical knowledge and experience (despite being the youngest!) and am the only one willing to visit customer sites.
    • Neil49
    • By Neil49 7th Jul 18, 9:53 PM
    • 1,376 Posts
    • 684 Thanks
    Neil49
    There is insufficient information on which to provide a meaningful response.

    Another meaningless dilemma.
    • mjm3346
    • By mjm3346 7th Jul 18, 11:34 PM
    • 38,716 Posts
    • 272,321 Thanks
    mjm3346
    You are just getting by doing the job, they outperform you in everything they do including going beyond just what needs to be done for the job. If anything their contribution is undervalued and they should really be looking for a far wider pay difference.
    Internet goodness £25580
    • Pollycat
    • By Pollycat 8th Jul 18, 7:18 AM
    • 20,979 Posts
    • 56,557 Thanks
    Pollycat
    You are just getting by doing the job, they outperform you in everything they do including going beyond just what needs to be done for the job. If anything their contribution is undervalued and they should really be looking for a far wider pay difference.
    Originally posted by mjm3346
    Wow! And you got all that from this:

    I just discovered my colleague is paid almost £5,000/yr more than me, yet we do exactly the same job and have similar levels of experience. Should I speak up?
    Originally posted by MSE Sarah
    Amazing.
    • Ebenezer_Screwj
    • By Ebenezer_Screwj 14th Sep 18, 11:27 AM
    • 420 Posts
    • 229 Thanks
    Ebenezer_Screwj
    Has your colleague got more years service than you? Employers are not legally bound to pay the same salary for your perceived equality on any level with him/her.
    • boothros
    • By boothros 8th Oct 18, 12:13 AM
    • 3 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    boothros
    Length of service or level of experience is not always an indicator. I’m not the OP, but please let me share my experience of why my three colleagues are paid £200 per month more than me.

    In 2004 all departments in my industry were asked to sign a new pay contract. This was a voluntary move although all new starters after a certain date would automatically be put onto the new contract.

    For myself, it meant a small drop in pay, and it was reputed that my particular position was possibly earmarked to be re-banded as in the opinion of my seniors, my job had been evaluated unfairly being somewhat specialist and incomparable to any other position. I was advised by senior staff in my department to ‘wait and see’ as I would be foolish to sign away the contract I had at that time.

    For these reasons, I didn’t sign the new contract on the understanding that I wouldn’t automatically get any Government actioned pay rises, which meant that eventually, my colleagues pay level would overtake my own, (which they did a couple of years ago). I was contacted by HR last year to enquire as to whether I would like to reconsider signing the pay deal and as a considerable pay rise was in the offing for members on the scheme, I decided I would.

    I was disheartened to discover however that my three colleagues are paid a little more than £200 p/m more than me. Even though I had reached the uppermost pay bracket in on my old pay scale, as I have just signed the new contract, I am considered a new starter even though the job description itself has not changed whatsoever.

    I have ten tears experience’s above any of my other three colleagues having trained two of them and interviewed one for the position. Two of them have appalling sick records and none of them choose to do overtime. I also help out my more senior colleagues with extra work that is actually theirs to do but which helps us all out and of which they’re very appreciative.
    To work my way up through the pay bands of my new contract and match the pay my fellow workers earn could take my anything up to another seven years at just such a time that I would like to be adding more to my own works place pension.

    So no, loyalty, long service and goodwill mean absolutely nothing in the great scheme of things. I could walk into the same establishment and start the worst paid job they have to offer tomorrow and still be on the wages that I’m on now which is all rather heart breaking.
    Last edited by boothros; 08-10-2018 at 12:22 AM. Reason: Looked a bit small
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