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    • MSE Megan F
    • By MSE Megan F 2nd Jul 18, 3:59 PM
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    MSE Megan F
    MSE News: Three-year minimum tenancies could be introduced for renters
    • #1
    • 2nd Jul 18, 3:59 PM
    MSE News: Three-year minimum tenancies could be introduced for renters 2nd Jul 18 at 3:59 PM
    Three-year tenancies could be introduced in a bid to give renters more long-term security, the Government has announced...
    Read the full story:
    'Three-year minimum tenancies could be introduced for renters'

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Page 8
    • seven-day-weekend
    • By seven-day-weekend 13th Jul 18, 8:37 AM
    • 31,443 Posts
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    seven-day-weekend
    If you had been looking to rent in the 1970s you would have had a problem. What is known as the rent acts decimated the privately rented property market. Tenants had security of tenure at controlled rents so there were people living in very nice area of London and paying peanuts in rent. Of course they were not going to move. If a tenant died and a property became vacant the landlords sold them. There were properties that needed repairs that would cost more than the entire year's rent so landlords of unregistered properties just disappeared. Properties with these rent act tenants sold for much much less than ones with vacant possession so no one was going to buy a property to let. The amount of rented property was reducing and reducing People who couldn't afford to buy had to live with their parents or other relatives or get a council house. If you got a council house you couldn't move to change jobs unless you could find someone to exchange with.



    So slowly the amount of rental property available reduced and reduced and of course what was left was all the dumps.



    If you have rented recently in England and would like to continue to have that option you need to oppose the 3 year tenancies and the end of no fault S21 because any landlord who remembers the rent acts will get out of property rental. In anyone area the number of rental houses coming to the market will not be as many as a new housing development so anyone hoping that it will reduce prices may get a bit of a shock. So not only will people still not be able to afford to buy but they also won't be able to rent anywhere either. Be careful what you wish for.
    Originally posted by Cakeguts
    Good post.

    We have just advertised our flat as available for rent and hopefully will get a tenant soon. They will get a six-moth tenancy and after that, if they have paid their rent and looked after the place and if they want to stay, they will get a rolling tenancy.

    I would not evict a good tenant, no landlord would. (I didn't evict my last one - he evicted himself by going to prison!).

    Presumably if this three year tenancy is made law it won't apply to existing tenants.

    If and when this next tenant leaves, and if the three year tenancy is law, I will sell the flat. It is a major asset and I need to be able to protect my asset. I won't rent it again if I can't evict someone.
    Member #10 of £2 savers club
    Imagine someone holding forth on biology whose only knowledge of the subject is the Book of British Birds, and you have a rough idea of what it feels like to read Richard Dawkins on theology: Terry Eagleton
    • westernpromise
    • By westernpromise 13th Jul 18, 9:53 AM
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    westernpromise
    The corollary to this, of course, is that there is often a lazy assumption that every rental house that is sold is net neutral: two people rented it and now two people will own it. This isn't the case. Rental property is more densely occupied than owned in a ratio of something like 4:3, i.e. you might get two couples renting a two-bed flat but if it is sold it will be occupied by a couple with a child.

    The effect of this is that every landlord who sells such a property will evict four tenants and the flat will then house only three ex-tenants. The fourth tenant still has to rent and the rental pool is shrinking. This can have only one effect on rental costs. If anyone is dumb enough to interfere with rents, it will just accelerate matters to crisis point that much faster.

    As Cakeguts observes, we'd then be back in the 70s when the only type of rental available was of the Rising Damp or Man About The House variety - grotty but still expensive because in short supply. And the landlord lived downstairs.
    Buying a house, if you believe the market has a way to fall, or if you are paying sill asking prices ( like some sheeple ) or if you are buying in London, is now a massive financial gamble!!!!! - June 8, 2012 by TheCountOfNowhere
    • Smodlet
    • By Smodlet 13th Jul 18, 11:57 AM
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    Smodlet
    You could get Environmental Health involved and there is legal action you can take by this route but if you are the homeowner it can be more sensible to sell than get into an actual neighbour dispute.
    Originally posted by Querty
    Querty, either I have not been clear or you missed the part about the injunctions, plural. Admittedly, I have not told the whole story as I do not want to give away any more than I already have for fear of being identified. We have done the court thing. We have done the EH thing to death. It is purely down to the judge's incompetence that the Chav was not evicted, imprisoned or both last month.

    Why should we move? She is the one in the wrong and even her useless LL will get her out one day. In the meantime, if she makes more noise than we are prepared to put up with, we call the police and she should be arrested.

    Thank you very much for your interest and I can only reiterate I wish either you, Cakeguts or any of the other decent LLs on here were her LL. You would never have let to her in the first place, I feel pretty sure.
    What is this life if, sweet wordsmith, we have no time to take the pith?
    Every stew starts with the first onion.
    I took it upon myself to investigate a trifle; it had custard, jelly, soggy sponge things...
    • dekaspace
    • By dekaspace 13th Jul 18, 1:02 PM
    • 4,702 Posts
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    dekaspace
    I have a mixed experience of renting on one hand people can call me a "bad" tenant because I had a few issues over the years when I have lost my job or had a benefits issue meaning I ended up a few weeks or a month behind in rent (which is always sorted) but never caused problems.


    The landlords who were rude to me and claimed I was a "bad" tenant would ask every 6 months did I want to sign new tenancy (so I pay more fees) Seemed obsessed with not letting me move out, always remember one property where I lived 3 years making me laugh thinking about it as my neighbour who was with same landlord was a drug dealer, his dog went to toilet on every carpet in house, the kitchen had smashed tiles from the clients, the dealers clients damaging the communal close area but as he always paid rent on time and didn't want repairs done he was a "good" tenant.


    Meanwhile when I moved out the LL wanted new carpet when I had a professional clean done, spent £30 myself cleaning and even wanted a whole bedroom repainted as the metal bed frame had scraped the wall around the headboard, he even had the cheek to claim I never cleaned once in 3 years despite having photos of a spotless property.


    On prices, in the estate I live 4 years ago you got a grotty run down 2 bed unfurnished property for £200-£275 a month, the nice part of town was £400 for the same but proper maisonette or even a house, im not blaming migrants but the area has become the migrant living area so the supply and demand has changed, the rents have gone up to coincidentally LHA rates £350 a month for a grotty 2 bedroom flat even £400 but the nice flats have only gone up by £25-£50 in better part of town!


    These properties are so bad as they are ex council, the ones with overgrown gardens, dumped matresses and furniture everywhere, drunken teenagers and adults on street shouting abuse.


    Why live there when a better place is up the road? Supply and demand sadly.
    • Crashy Time
    • By Crashy Time 13th Jul 18, 1:06 PM
    • 6,821 Posts
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    Crashy Time
    The corollary to this, of course, is that there is often a lazy assumption that every rental house that is sold is net neutral: two people rented it and now two people will own it. This isn't the case. Rental property is more densely occupied than owned in a ratio of something like 4:3, i.e. you might get two couples renting a two-bed flat but if it is sold it will be occupied by a couple with a child.

    The effect of this is that every landlord who sells such a property will evict four tenants and the flat will then house only three ex-tenants. The fourth tenant still has to rent and the rental pool is shrinking. This can have only one effect on rental costs. If anyone is dumb enough to interfere with rents, it will just accelerate matters to crisis point that much faster.

    As Cakeguts observes, we'd then be back in the 70s when the only type of rental available was of the Rising Damp or Man About The House variety - grotty but still expensive because in short supply. And the landlord lived downstairs.
    Originally posted by westernpromise

    After the hard Brexit we seem to be heading for it is the number of people looking for rental that will shrink, not the pool of available houses, there are plenty of houses, always has been.
    • westernpromise
    • By westernpromise 13th Jul 18, 1:27 PM
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    westernpromise
    Wrong as always, Crashy. Net immigration is still rising. We would need net negative immigration for rental demand to shrink. As the source of our net positive immigration is not and never was the EU, leaving the EU will not move us to net negative immigration.
    Buying a house, if you believe the market has a way to fall, or if you are paying sill asking prices ( like some sheeple ) or if you are buying in London, is now a massive financial gamble!!!!! - June 8, 2012 by TheCountOfNowhere
    • Crashy Time
    • By Crashy Time 13th Jul 18, 1:41 PM
    • 6,821 Posts
    • 2,513 Thanks
    Crashy Time
    Wrong as always, Crashy. Net immigration is still rising. We would need net negative immigration for rental demand to shrink. As the source of our net positive immigration is not and never was the EU, leaving the EU will not move us to net negative immigration.
    Originally posted by westernpromise

    A hard or "bad" Brexit will cost jobs, especially financial services, so less people will have a reason to want to rent a property here. Doesn`t matter where people come from, if they don`t have a job to come to they won`t come, and if benefits are not reigned in we are going to end up with a far right government IMO.
    • Cakeguts
    • By Cakeguts 13th Jul 18, 2:04 PM
    • 5,229 Posts
    • 7,941 Thanks
    Cakeguts
    Querty, either I have not been clear or you missed the part about the injunctions, plural. Admittedly, I have not told the whole story as I do not want to give away any more than I already have for fear of being identified. We have done the court thing. We have done the EH thing to death. It is purely down to the judge's incompetence that the Chav was not evicted, imprisoned or both last month.

    Why should we move? She is the one in the wrong and even her useless LL will get her out one day. In the meantime, if she makes more noise than we are prepared to put up with, we call the police and she should be arrested.

    Thank you very much for your interest and I can only reiterate I wish either you, Cakeguts or any of the other decent LLs on here were her LL. You would never have let to her in the first place, I feel pretty sure.
    Originally posted by Smodlet

    If by accident we had let the property to her and it would have only happened if she had lied to get the tenancy she would have got an S21 after the first 6 months fixed term.
    • Heliflyguy
    • By Heliflyguy 13th Jul 18, 2:14 PM
    • 850 Posts
    • 421 Thanks
    Heliflyguy
    Wrong as always, Crashy. Net immigration is still rising. We would need net negative immigration for rental demand to shrink. As the source of our net positive immigration is not and never was the EU, leaving the EU will not move us to net negative immigration.
    Originally posted by westernpromise
    If you look who is renting in the private sector in the road that I live in then you would notice that approx 75% of the rental properties are being rented by people from the EU.
    When they leave they are replaced by others from the EU.

    You cannot use net immigration to determine the effect on private rentals (certainly not in my area).
    • Smodlet
    • By Smodlet 13th Jul 18, 2:16 PM
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    Smodlet
    If by accident we had let the property to her and it would have only happened if she had lied to get the tenancy she would have got an S21 after the first 6 months fixed term.
    Originally posted by Cakeguts
    And when she ignored it...?
    What is this life if, sweet wordsmith, we have no time to take the pith?
    Every stew starts with the first onion.
    I took it upon myself to investigate a trifle; it had custard, jelly, soggy sponge things...
    • Cakeguts
    • By Cakeguts 13th Jul 18, 3:21 PM
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    Cakeguts
    And when she ignored it...?
    Originally posted by Smodlet

    Get taken to court and if in rent arrears get a CCJ. The CCJ costs extra but we do it so that the tenant can't do it to any other landlord as long as the landlord checks. It does make it more difficult for people to get credit to.
    • buglawton
    • By buglawton 13th Jul 18, 3:36 PM
    • 7,848 Posts
    • 4,512 Thanks
    buglawton
    Wrong as always, Crashy. Net immigration is still rising. We would need net negative immigration for rental demand to shrink. As the source of our net positive immigration is not and never was the EU, leaving the EU will not move us to net negative immigration.
    Originally posted by westernpromise
    EU immigration is a major source



    Credits to: https://fullfact.org/immigration/eu-migration-and-uk/
    • Smodlet
    • By Smodlet 13th Jul 18, 5:18 PM
    • 4,197 Posts
    • 7,506 Thanks
    Smodlet
    Get taken to court and if in rent arrears get a CCJ. The CCJ costs extra but we do it so that the tenant can't do it to any other landlord as long as the landlord checks. It does make it more difficult for people to get credit to.
    Originally posted by Cakeguts
    I think that's where the LL falls down. Anything that costs him a penny is a no-no. The loss of rent he could be recouping does not seem to penetrate the concrete block that passes for his brain.

    To be fair, he has taken her to court and the judge has done nothing. There must be something I am missing, as if it is my job to tell him what to do but if that is what it takes to get her out, so be it. I just don't know what to tell him to do, assuming he would even listen. It really feels as if nothing gets done if I don't drive it and it is so not my job.
    Last edited by Smodlet; 13-07-2018 at 5:20 PM.
    What is this life if, sweet wordsmith, we have no time to take the pith?
    Every stew starts with the first onion.
    I took it upon myself to investigate a trifle; it had custard, jelly, soggy sponge things...
    • Cakeguts
    • By Cakeguts 13th Jul 18, 7:28 PM
    • 5,229 Posts
    • 7,941 Thanks
    Cakeguts
    I think that's where the LL falls down. Anything that costs him a penny is a no-no. The loss of rent he could be recouping does not seem to penetrate the concrete block that passes for his brain.

    To be fair, he has taken her to court and the judge has done nothing. There must be something I am missing, as if it is my job to tell him what to do but if that is what it takes to get her out, so be it. I just don't know what to tell him to do, assuming he would even listen. It really feels as if nothing gets done if I don't drive it and it is so not my job.
    Originally posted by Smodlet

    He has to serve a valid notice. Then he has to pay for the bailiffs.
    • Crashy Time
    • By Crashy Time 16th Jul 18, 6:32 PM
    • 6,821 Posts
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    Crashy Time
    Good post.

    We have just advertised our flat as available for rent and hopefully will get a tenant soon. They will get a six-moth tenancy and after that, if they have paid their rent and looked after the place and if they want to stay, they will get a rolling tenancy.

    I would not evict a good tenant, no landlord would. (I didn't evict my last one - he evicted himself by going to prison!).

    Presumably if this three year tenancy is made law it won't apply to existing tenants.

    If and when this next tenant leaves, and if the three year tenancy is law, I will sell the flat. It is a major asset and I need to be able to protect my asset. I won't rent it again if I can't evict someone.
    Originally posted by seven-day-weekend

    Best sell it now then, before the Brexit meltdown gets going properly.
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