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  • FIRST POST
    • fifthofwhisky
    • By fifthofwhisky 25th Jun 18, 1:57 PM
    • 83Posts
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    fifthofwhisky
    Bricklayer day rate (West Midlands)
    • #1
    • 25th Jun 18, 1:57 PM
    Bricklayer day rate (West Midlands) 25th Jun 18 at 1:57 PM
    What would be ballpark day rate for bricklayer and day rate for the mate in the West Midlands (just south of Birmingham) or cost per thousand bricks laid?

    What I'm after is a 5m x 1.3m brick and block wall constructing. Footings and materials ready (was let down). What would be ball park costs?
    Last edited by fifthofwhisky; 25-06-2018 at 2:31 PM.
Page 1
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 25th Jun 18, 2:36 PM
    • 25,327 Posts
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    Doozergirl
    • #2
    • 25th Jun 18, 2:36 PM
    • #2
    • 25th Jun 18, 2:36 PM
    £200 a day, plus, for a bricklayer. A mate really depends on their skill level.

    If you can get hold of one! Demand is driving price.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • SpenderĀ£
    • By SpenderĀ£ 25th Jun 18, 4:02 PM
    • 71 Posts
    • 7 Thanks
    SpenderĀ£
    • #3
    • 25th Jun 18, 4:02 PM
    • #3
    • 25th Jun 18, 4:02 PM
    although it might seem risky a few years ago i noticed some bricklayers building some nearby apartment blocks so i approached them to ask if they could help build me a garden wall and one of them told me he could do it as a weekend job.
    Tell them what you want and ask for a total price rather than an hourly rate because they really take their time if they know you are paying by the hour.
    Bricklayers are in demand so it won't come cheap!
    Time Is The Enemy!
    • road2manchester
    • By road2manchester 2nd Jul 18, 9:52 PM
    • 73 Posts
    • 89 Thanks
    road2manchester
    • #4
    • 2nd Jul 18, 9:52 PM
    • #4
    • 2nd Jul 18, 9:52 PM
    5x1 on a per 100 rate !!!! Noooo! £200 a day or as above agree a job price.
    • VfM4meplse
    • By VfM4meplse 3rd Jul 18, 11:03 PM
    • 25,828 Posts
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    VfM4meplse
    • #5
    • 3rd Jul 18, 11:03 PM
    • #5
    • 3rd Jul 18, 11:03 PM
    £200 a day, plus, for a bricklayer. A mate really depends on their skill level.

    If you can get hold of one! Demand is driving price.
    Originally posted by Doozergirl
    I consider myself highly skilled in my job, but have obviously picked the wrong trade! Its no consolation that I could get the hang of building a brick wall within a few hours if I wanted to, but a bricklayer couldn't do what I do without at least 10 years of training
    Value-for-money-for-me-puhleeze!

    "No man is worth, crawling on the earth"- adapted from Bob Crewe and Bob Gaudio

    Hope is not a strategy ...A child is for life, not just 18 years....Don't get me started on the NHS, because you won't win...If in doubt, don't pull out... I love chaz-ing!
    • elsien
    • By elsien 3rd Jul 18, 11:23 PM
    • 16,738 Posts
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    elsien
    • #6
    • 3rd Jul 18, 11:23 PM
    • #6
    • 3rd Jul 18, 11:23 PM
    I consider myself highly skilled in my job, but have obviously picked the wrong trade! Its no consolation that I could get the hang of building a brick wall within a few hours if I wanted to, but a bricklayer couldn't do what I do without at least 10 years of training
    Originally posted by VfM4meplse
    Can we come and watch when your wall promptly falls down again?
    All shall be well, and all shall be well, and all manner of things shall be well.

    Pedant alert - it's could have, not could of.
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 3rd Jul 18, 11:41 PM
    • 25,327 Posts
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    Doozergirl
    • #7
    • 3rd Jul 18, 11:41 PM
    • #7
    • 3rd Jul 18, 11:41 PM
    I consider myself highly skilled in my job, but have obviously picked the wrong trade! Its no consolation that I could get the hang of building a brick wall within a few hours if I wanted to, but a bricklayer couldn't do what I do without at least 10 years of training
    Originally posted by VfM4meplse
    Fact is, you couldn't. It is a skill that takes a lot of time to learn and on a much lower rate of pay. Some are vastly better than others and that is testament to the time and effort it takes to be good at the job.

    Are you self employed or is someone else organising the marketing, sales, accounts, buildings... and absorbing the cost of employing you and running the overheads of a business?

    It really annoys me, actually. Bricklayers are in short supply because most people think they're above the building trade. Ironically, having so few decent people does drive prices up, but these people are outside in all weathers, in all conditions, the last few weeks included, all day every day and that also holds value. It's about time people gave them a bit of respect, given that we all rely on them to have places to sleep and work.

    I've been renovating for 20 years and I am still learning. I also know that we all go out in a box.
    Last edited by Doozergirl; 03-07-2018 at 11:45 PM.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 3rd Jul 18, 11:52 PM
    • 25,327 Posts
    • 69,003 Thanks
    Doozergirl
    • #8
    • 3rd Jul 18, 11:52 PM
    • #8
    • 3rd Jul 18, 11:52 PM
    Following on from that thought do you think there's more of a demand now than say 10/15 years previously or is it more to do with high demand in the building industry? Has there always been a similar shortage of good skilled trades (All trades not just brickies)?
    Originally posted by ajak81
    It is absolutely to do with craftmanship not being valued. We're notoriously poor in the UK at building enough houses, I doubt that number is increasing too much despite government targets.

    The trades are not considered a reputable career, apprenticeships were devalued, young people are guided away from it. There simply aren't enough younger people involved. It worries me that our people only get older. Who takes over?

    I'm quite keen for our son to pick up business with us. It seems to me that the ability to graft, run a business and communicate at different levels is something that will be valued even more moving forward.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • Kiran
    • By Kiran 4th Jul 18, 6:49 AM
    • 1,179 Posts
    • 523 Thanks
    Kiran
    • #9
    • 4th Jul 18, 6:49 AM
    • #9
    • 4th Jul 18, 6:49 AM
    Has there always been a similar shortage of good skilled trades (All trades not just brickies) or is it more acute now?
    Originally posted by ajak81
    There's been a skills shortage for quite some time but I think what made it ten times worse was when the credit crunch hit. People who worked out on site as self employed trades or for small contractors no longer had work so they took on alternative employment. To give you an example, a plasterer I know got a job with Amazon picking peoples orders to tide himself over. When the credit crunch eased he decided to stay with the regular pay and benefits. He still does a bit but it has to fit round his shifts so he picks and chooses the jobs that he wants basically just to keep up the skill.

    The other massive problem is builders are seen as the stereotype and the number of programmes on tv showing poor work over quality work is ridiculous. We also don't get taught enough practical skills to inspire people. The image of success to many people is going to work in a suit not delivering a quality building.
    Some people don't exaggerate........... They just remember big!
    • onomatopoeia99
    • By onomatopoeia99 4th Jul 18, 8:57 AM
    • 4,376 Posts
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    onomatopoeia99
    It is absolutely to do with craftmanship not being valued.
    Originally posted by Doozergirl
    There are plenty of us out there that do value it, but the problem is wider than the building trade. Look at music and film, so many people would rather torrent a film rather than buying a DVD, because they don't value the craft of those involved in producing it. It's endemic in society.

    I have heard from the other side (admittedly a decade or so ago now, when my friend's stepchildren were at school leaving age and not looking to go to university) that competition for trade apprenticeships is fierce. You will obviously have direct experience - are building firms taking on apprentices? I don't mean Persimmon sized firms, I mean small local ones that do things like extensions.
    INTP, nerd, libertarian and scifi geek.
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    • Furts
    • By Furts 4th Jul 18, 9:20 AM
    • 4,411 Posts
    • 2,849 Thanks
    Furts
    There are plenty of us out there that do value it,

    I have heard from the other side (admittedly a decade or so ago now, when my friend's stepchildren were at school leaving age and not looking to go to university) that competition for trade apprenticeships is fierce. You will obviously have direct experience - are building firms taking on apprentices? I don't mean Persimmon sized firms, I mean small local ones that do things like extensions.
    Originally posted by onomatopoeia99

    I will give my humble take ...Persimmon sized firm in house building have maintained zero interest in apprenticeships for generations. They have driven down standards, driven down quality, driven down workmanship and driven down apprenticeships. They all, collectively, bear a huge responsibilty for the state the construction industry is now in in terms of poor skill levels, insufficient labour, and lack of respect for the workers and their skills.

    Smaller builders doing extensions, jobbing builders, and small sub contractors - think small plumbers and electricians- also have zero interest in apprenticeships. They look at the big companies and think - "if they with all their money and resources cannot be bothered then why should we? We do not have the time and resources, and we are at the bottom of the food chain. Which means even if we wanted to take on apprentices (and some do) it is a difficult concept to implement".


    This in turn means most apprentices are regarded as cheap labour and treated accordingly. They receive poor guidance and almost non existant training. The apprentices frequently become peed off, and coupled with H&S Laws, having apprentices on site is a potential legal/supervision nightmare. (Here I was having issues last year!)
    • PasturesNew
    • By PasturesNew 4th Jul 18, 9:33 AM
    • 63,213 Posts
    • 370,228 Thanks
    PasturesNew
    I used to know a British Rail bricklayer, he did a full 3-4 year apprenticeship. One full day at college per week (9am to 6pm) and four days of working. The work was mostly repairing old tunnels and bridges, as well as a bit of station repair work, platform repairs and other maintenance work on other buildings along the line.

    That needed "a proper apprenticeship" because you can't let "any loon" loose on a 120 year old railway tunnel and parapet and trust that the next train of 200 people passing through won't get crushed.

    But, for the majority of work these days, I bet most just need to know how to build a straight/safe wall of bricks.... few will ever need to build arches, or curves, or work with unusual stonework. "Features" in a building cost extra, so everyday designs don't have "features".
    • Jackmydad
    • By Jackmydad 4th Jul 18, 6:08 PM
    • 3,134 Posts
    • 9,706 Thanks
    Jackmydad
    Didn't traditional apprenticeships going back to the beginning of the 20th century used to be 5 to 7 years long?
    Originally posted by ajak81
    Yes, I did five and a half years in the early to mid 70s.
    And then I was an "improver" for some time until a job came up in another department.
    It's the only way to learn a trade properly, if the resulting craftsmen are to have enough practical experience as well as theoretical knowledge, and to know what "craftsmanship" is.
    I changed trades after some years, but what I had learned still stood me in good stead.
    "Luck happens where hard work meets opportunity"
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