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  • FIRST POST
    • sevenhills
    • By sevenhills 20th Jun 18, 11:50 AM
    • 1,737Posts
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    sevenhills
    Loft conversion
    • #1
    • 20th Jun 18, 11:50 AM
    Loft conversion 20th Jun 18 at 11:50 AM
    I am still keen on getting my loft converted into a livable bedroom.
    I have only had quotes from one company so for, ranging from boarding out at 500, hoby room at 5,000 and habitable at 29,000


    I have seen people state that they have had a habitable coversion including onsuite for 25,000


    My thoughts are to employ an architect to draw up the plans, and do a good deal of the work myself. I have seen a youtube video about DIY loft conversions, but still more to learn. I have read a lot online, how much I can do, I am unsure./

    I will also need to concider a employing structural engineer. I live in a 60s built town house.


    I do have a few thousand in savings, but unless I get talked into letting the local Yorkshire loft conversion company do a lot of the work, I will do things slowly.
    It should easy for me to put 5,000+ onto the mortgage.

Page 1
    • Aylesbury Duck
    • By Aylesbury Duck 20th Jun 18, 12:08 PM
    • 2,402 Posts
    • 3,185 Thanks
    Aylesbury Duck
    • #2
    • 20th Jun 18, 12:08 PM
    • #2
    • 20th Jun 18, 12:08 PM
    I am still keen on getting my loft converted into a livable bedroom.
    I have only had quotes from one company so for, ranging from boarding out at 500, hoby room at 5,000 and habitable at 29,000


    I have seen people state that they have had a habitable coversion including onsuite for 25,000


    My thoughts are to employ an architect to draw up the plans, and do a good deal of the work myself. I have seen a youtube video about DIY loft conversions, but still more to learn. I have read a lot online, how much I can do, I am unsure./

    I will also need to concider a employing structural engineer. I live in a 60s built town house.


    I do have a few thousand in savings, but unless I get talked into letting the local Yorkshire loft conversion company do a lot of the work, I will do things slowly.
    It should easy for me to put 5,000+ onto the mortgage.
    Originally posted by sevenhills
    I actually shuddered at this. Please don't tackle something as big as this on the basis of Youtube training.

    Avoid loft conversion companies and do as you suggest: get a structural engineering involved to see what is possible and what is needed and then use a proper building firm to carry out the work. If you can do some of the finishing yourself as a competent DIY-er then do so, but leave the structural and safety stuff to the professionals.
    • roger-w5
    • By roger-w5 20th Jun 18, 1:43 PM
    • 70 Posts
    • 21 Thanks
    roger-w5
    • #3
    • 20th Jun 18, 1:43 PM
    • #3
    • 20th Jun 18, 1:43 PM
    Tbh its best to use an established loft converting company to do it all on a fixed price.

    diy work is always considered diy work as per my conveyancing partner.

    diy has its disadvantages.
    • Andy123.
    • By Andy123. 20th Jun 18, 3:07 PM
    • 17 Posts
    • 6 Thanks
    Andy123.
    • #4
    • 20th Jun 18, 3:07 PM
    • #4
    • 20th Jun 18, 3:07 PM
    I!!!8217;ve just completed my own loft conversion. I know have a 6x5 metre bedroom and a 2.7x1.7 metre ensuite.

    I spent -

    - 15.5k on drawings, structural engineer and a carpenter do come and do the shell for me (stairs, joists, 9 x steels, upgrade trusses, 8 metre long dorma with 3 windows, 1 x velux, new flat roof and rendered outside)

    - roughly 8-9k on flooring, insulation, walls, plastering, decorating, carpets and furnishings, electrics, plumbing to get it all finished.
    • Andy123.
    • By Andy123. 20th Jun 18, 3:08 PM
    • 17 Posts
    • 6 Thanks
    Andy123.
    • #5
    • 20th Jun 18, 3:08 PM
    • #5
    • 20th Jun 18, 3:08 PM
    That includes new boiler and invented hot water cylinder fitted aswell.
    • sevenhills
    • By sevenhills 20th Jun 18, 7:24 PM
    • 1,737 Posts
    • 629 Thanks
    sevenhills
    • #6
    • 20th Jun 18, 7:24 PM
    • #6
    • 20th Jun 18, 7:24 PM
    I!!!8217;ve just completed my own loft conversion. I know have a 6x5 metre bedroom and a 2.7x1.7 metre ensuite.

    I spent -
    Originally posted by Andy123.

    That looks a lot bigger and more complex than my loft. How long did it take you. I do have the advantage of not working during the school holidays.



    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 20th Jun 18, 7:35 PM
    • 26,034 Posts
    • 70,322 Thanks
    Doozergirl
    • #7
    • 20th Jun 18, 7:35 PM
    • #7
    • 20th Jun 18, 7:35 PM
    That looks a lot bigger and more complex than my loft. How long did it take you. I do have the advantage of not working during the school holidays.


    Originally posted by sevenhills

    What are you going to use it for? Do you have the head height to convert it? I'm counting 187.5cm according to the visible bricks on the pier (chimney?). Even with some rockwool over the joists it can't be much more than 2 metres in the middle.

    With a slope like that, 120mm of solid insulation and an air gap, there's no room for a legal staircase and it's arguably not big enough for much at all.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • Hoploz
    • By Hoploz 20th Jun 18, 8:09 PM
    • 3,842 Posts
    • 3,386 Thanks
    Hoploz
    • #8
    • 20th Jun 18, 8:09 PM
    • #8
    • 20th Jun 18, 8:09 PM
    You say it's a 'town house.'
    Just thinking that if you've already got 3 floors then going in to the loft isn't going to be hugely desirable for resale.
    ... But of course if it's just because you really need the extra space yourself that's fine, but I doubt it'd add any value.
    • sevenhills
    • By sevenhills 20th Jun 18, 8:14 PM
    • 1,737 Posts
    • 629 Thanks
    sevenhills
    • #9
    • 20th Jun 18, 8:14 PM
    • #9
    • 20th Jun 18, 8:14 PM
    What are you going to use it for? Do you have the head height to convert it? I'm counting 187.5cm according to the visible bricks on the pier (chimney?). Even with some rockwool over the joists it can't be much more than 2 metres in the middle.
    With a slope like that, 120mm of solid insulation and an air gap, there's no room for a legal staircase and it's arguably not big enough for much at all.
    Originally posted by Doozergirl

    Its quite easy to stand up in the middle, I was told the staircase adding height would make it ok. But then again he did quote 29k, to discourage me.
    I am hoping it will be habitable, but I am not expecting 24/7 living, just as a spare bedroom for family. So spending a lot of money is doubtful.

    Just measured to the top beam, around 202cm

    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 20th Jun 18, 8:35 PM
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    Doozergirl
    Its quite easy to stand up in the middle, I was told the staircase adding height would make it ok. But then again he did quote 29k, to discourage me.
    I am hoping it will be habitable, but I am not expecting 24/7 living, just as a spare bedroom for family. So spending a lot of money is doubtful.

    Just measured to the top beam, around 202cm
    Originally posted by sevenhills
    The insulation is going to bring that down further. It's not going to meet building regulations for the stairs. Are you planning to drop the ceilings downstairs for it?

    Is this a forever house? Be aware that it's not going to add any money. I don't actually think it is going to be habitable. I presume you want a full width dormer.

    Mark out on the floor where the bed goes and then mark out the route to get the bed. What's the space, headheight like where it isn't going to be raised?

    Where do the stairs come up? How does that compromise space downstairs? What do you lose? Stairs take a huge amount of space as they come up and the smaller the space available, the less likely one is to find the right route up that suits both downstairs and up.

    Unless there's a secret loft you're not showing us, it's a waste of money for a pretty unpleasant space. I wouldn't waste the money.


    Get an architect in to draw it out if you think the room is there. Your first battle is building regulations - bearing in mind that they are the minimum standards. There is some logic behind them.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • sevenhills
    • By sevenhills 20th Jun 18, 8:49 PM
    • 1,737 Posts
    • 629 Thanks
    sevenhills
    Where do the stairs come up? How does that compromise space downstairs? What do you lose? Stairs take a huge amount of space as they come up and the smaller the space available, the less likely one is to find the right route up that suits both downstairs and up.

    Unless there's a secret loft you're not showing us, it's a waste of money for a pretty unpleasant space. I wouldn't waste the money.


    Get an architect in to draw it out if you think the room is there. Your first battle is building regulations - bearing in mind that they are the minimum standards. There is some logic behind them.
    Originally posted by Doozergirl

    The stairs come up via 2 long cupboards in the landing, central or almost. Space is tight.

    I do intend to live here until the foreseeable future. I am not bothered about adding value, but neither do I want to waste my money.
    There are 3 other houses of the same type with either bedrooms or non-habitable rooms in their loft space.

    Thanks for your input.


    Here is a similar house, which is a poor example of a good loft.


    http://www.rightmove.co.uk/house-prices/detailMatching.html?prop=32409021&sale=53665314&co untry=england
    Last edited by sevenhills; 20-06-2018 at 9:37 PM.

    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 20th Jun 18, 9:15 PM
    • 26,034 Posts
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    Doozergirl
    I can't see which house you're linking to, but please don't do it.

    Looking at those houss prices you can buy a bigger house with less money and less trouble. You'll never see a penny back of what you spend even with full building regulations and doing it yourself and you won't enjoy the space either.

    Take it as the friendly advice it's intended to be. I really don't want to pee on your party but this is MSE.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • sevenhills
    • By sevenhills 20th Jun 18, 9:51 PM
    • 1,737 Posts
    • 629 Thanks
    sevenhills
    You'll never see a penny back of what you spend even with full building regulations and doing it yourself and you won't enjoy the space either.

    Take it as the friendly advice it's intended to be. I really don't want to pee on your party but this is MSE.
    Originally posted by Doozergirl

    When I got the 29k quote, I thought the conversion would not happen, but I persevered and thought I was the type of person to make use of an extra room.
    But now I am thinking there is too much work to make a decent room, at a reasonable cost.
    The example below is of a neighbouring property that has had non-habitable room installed, its rather poor.


    Last edited by sevenhills; 31-07-2018 at 11:19 AM.

    • dunroving
    • By dunroving 20th Jun 18, 10:26 PM
    • 1,371 Posts
    • 967 Thanks
    dunroving
    The stairs come up via 2 long cupboards in the landing, central or almost. Space is tight.

    I do intend to live here until the foreseeable future. I am not bothered about adding value, but neither do I want to waste my money.
    There are 3 other houses of the same type with either bedrooms or non-habitable rooms in their loft space.

    Thanks for your input.


    Here is a similar house, which is a poor example of a good loft.


    http://www.rightmove.co.uk/house-prices/detailMatching.html?prop=32409021&sale=53665314&co untry=england
    Originally posted by sevenhills
    FYI, I've found that links from Rightmove "Sold prices" house pages don't work.

    Looking at the photo, there's no way I'd pay 29k for that pokey little room.
    (Nearly) dunroving
    • sevenhills
    • By sevenhills 24th Jun 18, 12:52 AM
    • 1,737 Posts
    • 629 Thanks
    sevenhills
    Mark out on the floor where the bed goes and then mark out the route to get the bed. What's the space, headheight like where it isn't going to be raised?
    Originally posted by Doozergirl

    I had a chat with my new next door neighbour today, he showed me around his loft conversion of some 15/20 years ago. He said it didnt comply with regulations and if he sold it, he would have to sell it as a two bedroomed.
    The whole house is 'new' so it was nice, but the loft was very cramped.
    It had a real staircase, but it did make the bedroom much smaller; the chimney stack also made the bedroom loft very cramped.
    Removing the chimney would be a must.

    • ronan01
    • By ronan01 9th Jul 18, 1:18 PM
    • 9 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    ronan01
    Hiring a different people like architect and engineers, etc for one project will increase hurdles instead of that you should choose one company which can handle the full project and all works for you. Generally, loft conversion cost 20-45,000 and 4-8 weeks of work.
    • Furts
    • By Furts 9th Jul 18, 2:33 PM
    • 4,450 Posts
    • 2,887 Thanks
    Furts
    Hiring a different people like architect and engineers, etc for one project will increase hurdles instead of that you should choose one company which can handle the full project and all works for you. Generally, loft conversion cost 20-45,000 and 4-8 weeks of work.
    Originally posted by ronan01

    100% pure nonsense, peddled all too frquently by cowboys, spivs and all round conmen and conwomen.
    • bigisi
    • By bigisi 9th Jul 18, 3:37 PM
    • 429 Posts
    • 767 Thanks
    bigisi
    100% pure nonsense, peddled all too frquently by cowboys, spivs and all round conmen and conwomen.
    Originally posted by Furts
    Judging by the website in his profile he fits all of those.

    Reported all his posts for spamming.
    • sevenhills
    • By sevenhills 30th Jul 18, 8:06 PM
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    • 629 Thanks
    sevenhills
    Looking at the photo, there's no way I'd pay 29k for that pokey little room.
    Originally posted by dunroving

    Yes, even spending 5,000 is questionable unless its going to be really needed.
    I did have a quote just to board out and a new loft hatch for 1,000.
    Since my cash is committed elesewhere at the moment I thought I would just board it out myself.
    But it has been pertially boarded before, I just assumed that it would need boarding on the highest beam. There are only 2 beams going accross, is that all that is holding it up, lol





    But as you can see from the photo, that is not the case.
    I am also surprised that the chimney is leaning. When I look at other houses of the same design, their chimney is on the far side of the peak of the roof, whereas mine straddles the roof. It was built in the 60s, so I guess its ok.
    If I ever make a better job of it, the chimney will have to come out.

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