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  • FIRST POST
    • cuddlymarm
    • By cuddlymarm 12th Jun 18, 1:39 PM
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    cuddlymarm
    Prepping for Brexit thread
    • #1
    • 12th Jun 18, 1:39 PM
    Prepping for Brexit thread 12th Jun 18 at 1:39 PM
    Hi guys
    Iím pretty well resolved to the fact that Brexit is going to affect us all. I donít want this thread to be a good or bad, right or wrong type thing.
    Just a positive, what can we prepare to make life easier, less expensive, less disruptive when it does happen.

    My aims are to stock up on items I think are going to get more expensive. Also to try and save up an emergency fund ( that will be slow going as OH took early retirement due to illness) and Iím unemployed at the moment.

    So my aims are to work out what items need to be stocked up
    To look for a job
    To live as frugally as possible while eating healthily
    To make sure the savings we have already donít get touched

    So guys please feel free to join in and list anything you think may be affected. Or just to comment. That way we can help each other.

    Hope to hear from you all soon
    Cuddles
Page 7
    • MrsLurcherwalker
    • By MrsLurcherwalker 6th Jul 18, 12:02 PM
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    MrsLurcherwalker
    Two sides will always be two sides and no one likes to be seen as losing a vote. The Brexit result was so close anyway I wonder where we'd be if it had been exactly 50/50 and the nation split equally between stay and leave. I seem to think that the last time it happened we had a civil war! if that's the case I'm happy to put up with criticism and derogatory comments from the slightly smaller remain vote but I'm not aware of seeing gloating and triumphalism from the stay voters, perhaps that says something about why folks voted the way they chose to. I certainly gave long hard consideration to both sides of the arguments for and against staying or leaving and my decision, which is mine alone was reasoned and from experience and nothing to do with a bloke and a bus with writing on. I really hope that something as crucial to the future of the UK wasn't decided by people either liking or hating either the political parties involved or propaganda on busses and in the media.
    Thumpers mum was right - if you can't find anything nice to say don't say anything at all!
    • mardatha
    • By mardatha 6th Jul 18, 12:12 PM
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    mardatha
    I think 2 things are important. One is that people are aware now of how the govt lies. And how big and shameless the lies are.
    The other thing is that they can't defy the will of the people, it's democracy in action. If we let them away with this then things will go to hell. If they renege on this then I for one want a second Indy referendum lol .
    • MrsLurcherwalker
    • By MrsLurcherwalker 6th Jul 18, 12:50 PM
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    MrsLurcherwalker
    Whoever is in government lies, it's how governments are, the party in power at any given moment is irrelevant they ALL LIE! they have always lied so it's really important that they are seen to honour the decision made by the populace however the individuals in that populace came to make the decision to vote stay or go and irrelevant of how we on OS voted, that's a personal choice and no ones business but our own, those who voted leave were slightly larger in number than those who voted stay so the government cannot be allowed to choose not to honour the will of the people or we are not a democracy and that would be even more unforgivable!
    Thumpers mum was right - if you can't find anything nice to say don't say anything at all!
    • fuddle
    • By fuddle 6th Jul 18, 1:02 PM
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    fuddle
    I think that's a very good place to draw a line. I do think politics is hard to avoid but I think that this thread will become more popular, and needed, as the months drop off.

    Dammit, pencil is blunt. Someone, quick draw a line!
    Be like a tree.
    Stay grounded. Connect with your roots. Turn over a new leaf.
    Bend before you break. Enjoy your natural beauty. Keep growing.
    • MrsLurcherwalker
    • By MrsLurcherwalker 6th Jul 18, 1:24 PM
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    MrsLurcherwalker
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------xxx.
    Thumpers mum was right - if you can't find anything nice to say don't say anything at all!
    • MrsLurcherwalker
    • By MrsLurcherwalker 6th Jul 18, 4:08 PM
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    MrsLurcherwalker
    One aspect of Brexit came via the post at lunchtime in the form of a letter from our lovely Dentist George who had written to say he'd after much debate gone back home to Greece with his family for good. I think the NHS might not be as accessible as it has been if many EU citizens currently working in it decide to go back to their home countries, sad because he is a very good Dentist but pleased for him and the family if it gives them the stability they need.
    Thumpers mum was right - if you can't find anything nice to say don't say anything at all!
    • Witless
    • By Witless 6th Jul 18, 5:43 PM
    • 670 Posts
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    Witless
    Without 'taking sides' (I've previously expressed my opinions/preferences) this is quite an interesting link, from what I believe to be a trusted source, with some interesting facts & figures.

    http://www.countryfile.com/article/can-uk-feed-itself
    • m1kjm
    • By m1kjm 6th Jul 18, 8:30 PM
    • 1,214 Posts
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    m1kjm
    Anyway, getting back to prepping, perfume has risen in price recently so I wonder if that'll go up even more and if I should stock up now when it's on offer.

    I want to support my local small shops and farm shops more anyway, but I'm wondering if it would be even more worthwhile in the event of panic buying of food if stock doesn't reach us for a few days. I'm remembering how during the fuel strikes loyal customers were given priority over other customers by small shops.
    • grunnie
    • By grunnie 7th Jul 18, 8:32 AM
    • 1,670 Posts
    • 9,824 Thanks
    grunnie
    Without 'taking sides' (I've previously expressed my opinions/preferences) this is quite an interesting link, from what I believe to be a trusted source, with some interesting facts & figures.

    http://www.countryfile.com/article/can-uk-feed-itself
    Originally posted by Witless
    Good article thanks
    • MrsLurcherwalker
    • By MrsLurcherwalker 7th Jul 18, 8:35 AM
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    MrsLurcherwalker
    I think if we have supply problems it will be over the amount of product available and the speed or lack thereof with which more can be made and that depends in part on where the raw materials come from. I don't think the real problem will be a few days of shortages and then back to normal but shortages for however long it takes to find alternative suppliers of the component parts and a big enough constant supply. That might take months if it could be done at all. UK farming has been subject to supermarket bullying and EU regulation for so long now that farmers have been in an ever tightening noose from all sides and it's no wonder so many have given up altogether or diversified away from producing milk etc. This looks like a 'perfect storm' scenario.
    Thumpers mum was right - if you can't find anything nice to say don't say anything at all!
    • cuddlymarm
    • By cuddlymarm 7th Jul 18, 8:44 AM
    • 1,170 Posts
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    cuddlymarm
    Hi guys
    Iíve been thinking and I think the way to stock up is on what you would miss most as well as the basics.

    m1kjm pointed out that perfume is rising in price so will probably stock up a bit. I must admit I like a nice bottle of wine occasionally so I think that would be one of the things I stock up on. Different people will miss different things I suppose.

    I have a good supply of teabags but will make sure that is kept up because that is a basic and something I donít want to have to do without but most things I could live without. If we had to manage without meat OH would be extremely grumpy.

    What things would you miss guys?
    This has got me thinking now
    I may be back later
    Cuddles
    • MrsLurcherwalker
    • By MrsLurcherwalker 7th Jul 18, 8:52 AM
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    MrsLurcherwalker
    CUDDLES an old wartime dodge to extend how much tea you have was to pick, shred (stainless steel knife only) young bramble leaves, spread them out on absorbent paper and leave them in a cool dry place to dry for a few days. This was mixed with the tea ration (can also apparently be used on it's own) to make it go further. People also used to use tea leaves (no tea bags then) and then dry them to be added back into the tea ration and again you had an extender. I haven't tried the bramble leaves as a tea but it was common practise and apparently on their own they taste like china tea. We have an awful lot of wild blackberries in this country so maybe we'd be OK?
    Thumpers mum was right - if you can't find anything nice to say don't say anything at all!
    • Living proof
    • By Living proof 7th Jul 18, 12:21 PM
    • 1,367 Posts
    • 8,753 Thanks
    Living proof
    Tea alternatives
    CUDDLES an old wartime dodge to extend how much tea you have was to pick, shred (stainless steel knife only) young bramble leaves, spread them out on absorbent paper and leave them in a cool dry place to dry for a few days. This was mixed with the tea ration (can also apparently be used on it's own) to make it go further. People also used to use tea leaves (no tea bags then) and then dry them to be added back into the tea ration and again you had an extender. I haven't tried the bramble leaves as a tea but it was common practise and apparently on their own they taste like china tea. We have an awful lot of wild blackberries in this country so maybe we'd be OK?
    Originally posted by MrsLurcherwalker
    I believe raspberry tea is supposed to be efficacious as well!
    Solar Suntellite 250 x16 4kW Afore 3600TL dual 2KW E 2KW W no shade, DN15 March 14
    Mortgage and Debt Free. Unfortunately Pension Free too!
    • MrsLurcherwalker
    • By MrsLurcherwalker 7th Jul 18, 1:46 PM
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    MrsLurcherwalker
    Perhaps it might be a good idea to consider what grows naturally here in the UK and think what might be worth foraging for and what you could do with it?

    Gorse flowers make a nice tea, as does yarrow and chamomile. We can grow mint in the garden and make mint tea or extend black tea with that middle eastern fashion, we know that sugar beet grows here so sugar ought not be an issue but there are increasing numbers of beekeepers and a honey supply but did you know that silver birch trees can be tapped for their sap early in the season and you can make a sweet syrup or wine from it? the syrup is the sap evaporated until it's reduced to 100th of it's volume (100 litres makes I litre of syrup) and it is a little like maple syrup which is made by the same method. We have an awful lot of birch trees in the UK! Hawthorn and rowan are both widely grown and wild in the UK and both have a use in that they can be made into a savoury 'jelly' to have with meats, crab apples (again an awful lot of them here), blackberries, rose hips can all be made into jelly or syrup or both, beech nuts, hazel nuts both edible and both can be cold pressed to give an edible oil which is also used in oil lamps. Chestnuts grow wild, walnuts grow wild and farmed too to use as nuts in protein filled dishes. Jams, jellies and chutneys can all be made from foraged fruits, fruit can be preserved in honey in jars, cider can be made from fermented apple juice (we do it an a relatively small scale but make enough to keep himself in cider for the year) and cider left open to the air will happily turn itself into cider vinegar. None of the above ideas are essentially necessary for us to survive but would be the little touches of interest that made bland meals delicious. So many other things available but this would cover pages if I listed them all!
    Thumpers mum was right - if you can't find anything nice to say don't say anything at all!
    • betterlife
    • By betterlife 7th Jul 18, 5:19 PM
    • 851 Posts
    • 3,011 Thanks
    betterlife
    Hi all, great thread! I hadn!!!8217;t t really thought much about the effects of Brexit on our supermarket prices and food availability, but with a recent cut in our income, and Brexit fast approaching Id like to get a bit more organised. I am not to worried as of yet, as we are already quite resourceful in some areas, but also need to pull my finger out in other areas!
    Things we already do:
    Grow plums, rhubarb, strawberries, raspberries, and blueberries in the garden. Which we eat fresh, freeze and preserve.
    There are a huge amount of elderflower trees around here which I use for cordial, champagne, jelly and jam, and will make more use when the berries are ripe too.
    We have use of a private woodland which has apple trees, greengage, hazelnuts, there is also a big problem with deer on the land which my husband is managing (full firearms license) so we have venison, rabbits and pheasants when in season (but will be frozen for year round meat) I can also butcher what we get. And will make use of hides etc.
    I have also noticed a local house which has a huge walnut tree full of fruit which over hangs the road, so will see if I can barter for some when ready or collect fallen ones from roadside.
    I!!!8217;m extremely crafty and can sew, knit, basket weave, bookbind, work with clay, paint, etc. Cook from scratch, bake cakes, biscuits, bread etc.
    My husband can woodwork, weld, fix cars, and pretty much put his hand at most things.
    We also can fish and live on coast.
    We can forage for wild mushrooms, dandelions (jellies, tea etc) nettles (wine, tea, eat) wood for fire, and more.
    What we want to do:
    Grow veg: we have a big garden and access to private land so want to grow basics, potatoes, carrots, runners, broccoli, cabbage, onions etc
    Salad items, and more fruit.
    Considering chickens for eggs and the table.
    We have and open fire but don!!!8217;t use it, but can if needed.
    We have a 3 bed semi house (four kids) which gets cold in the winter, downstairs the lounger/dinning is open plan so I intend to put thick curtain in between for winter to keep lounge warmer, we use thicker winter curtains and blankets, hot water bottles etc.
    I!!!8217;ll stock up on more basic tins and grains. Would like to rely less on freezer so may look into canning.
    Need to save some emergency money.
    Xx
    Last edited by betterlife; 07-07-2018 at 5:21 PM.
    One day I will live in a cabin in the woods
    • parsniphead
    • By parsniphead 7th Jul 18, 5:46 PM
    • 2,530 Posts
    • 16,193 Thanks
    parsniphead
    Hi all, great thread! I hadn!!!8217;t t really thought much about the effects of Brexit on our supermarket prices and food availability, but with a recent cut in our income, and Brexit fast approaching Id like to get a bit more organised. I am not to worried as of yet, as we are already quite resourceful in some areas, but also need to pull my finger out in other areas!
    Things we already do:
    Grow plums, rhubarb, strawberries, raspberries, and blueberries in the garden. Which we eat fresh, freeze and preserve.
    There are a huge amount of elderflower trees around here which I use for cordial, champagne, jelly and jam, and will make more use when the berries are ripe too.
    We have use of a private woodland which has apple trees, greengage, hazelnuts, there is also a big problem with deer on the land which my husband is managing (full firearms license) so we have venison, rabbits and pheasants when in season (but will be frozen for year round meat) I can also butcher what we get. And will make use of hides etc.
    I have also noticed a local house which has a huge walnut tree full of fruit which over hangs the road, so will see if I can barter for some when ready or collect fallen ones from roadside.
    I!!!8217;m extremely crafty and can sew, knit, basket weave, bookbind, work with clay, paint, etc. Cook from scratch, bake cakes, biscuits, bread etc.
    My husband can woodwork, weld, fix cars, and pretty much put his hand at most things.
    We also can fish and live on coast.
    We can forage for wild mushrooms, dandelions (jellies, tea etc) nettles (wine, tea, eat) wood for fire, and more.
    What we want to do:
    Grow veg: we have a big garden and access to private land so want to grow basics, potatoes, carrots, runners, broccoli, cabbage, onions etc
    Salad items, and more fruit.
    Considering chickens for eggs and the table.
    We have and open fire but don!!!8217;t use it, but can if needed.
    We have a 3 bed semi house (four kids) which gets cold in the winter, downstairs the lounger/dinning is open plan so I intend to put thick curtain in between for winter to keep lounge warmer, we use thicker winter curtains and blankets, hot water bottles etc.
    I!!!8217;ll stock up on more basic tins and grains. Would like to rely less on freezer so may look into canning.
    Need to save some emergency money.
    Xx
    Originally posted by betterlife
    Please keep your posts coming. It was so lovely to read. I do many of those things but have no access to woodlands and live nowhere near the coast.!!!128533; I'm so jealous.!!!128521;
    My mini challenge: pay off MBNA by 31/08/18. £502/£502 100% (paid off 30/06/18 - 2 months early )
    Next small debt victim £20/£367 - you're going by 31/08/2018
    Total outstanding consumer debt - £735.68/ £7864.52 9.3%
    • MrsLurcherwalker
    • By MrsLurcherwalker 7th Jul 18, 7:22 PM
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    MrsLurcherwalker
    I wonder if the 'infrastructure' of this country will be kept together post Brexit, the roads are in a pretty bad way now, the national grid isn't in very good shape either although I have to say that here in Hampshire they had a refurbishment programme running for a couple of years, the water infrastructure is old and leaks very badly, the gas pipes here have been renewed in the last 20 years but I don't know if it was countrywide, the sewerage system is old and so are many of the treatment plants, our coastal defences and river flood defences aren't adequate for the job, the bus and train companies are so badly run and unreliable, I just wonder what we'll be dealing with if EU money and grants disappear ? Then there are ageing NHS buildings, schools that are old and have been so badly built that they are falling down (literally)the defence forces have been pared to the bone, the police forces also are much less in all areas than they ever have been before, I just wonder what we'll be left with and if any of it will ever be fixed?
    Thumpers mum was right - if you can't find anything nice to say don't say anything at all!
    • mardatha
    • By mardatha 7th Jul 18, 10:28 PM
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    mardatha
    Agree with all of that MrsL. Things have been let slide for too long and we don't know where that will go.
    For me, the only thing I can think of just now in the food line, is fruit. I live too high to grow anything apart from berries, so we would miss out on apples and plums. I'd have to go back to an older kind of diet though, and research what people here used to eat.
    Porridge and turnips probly
    • MrsLurcherwalker
    • By MrsLurcherwalker 8th Jul 18, 4:50 PM
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    MrsLurcherwalker
    Sorry to have to mention this MAR but I think you'll find that KALE played a big part in the Scottish diet in the past along with the porridge and turnips! In all the history books I've come across regarding scots cuisine it's been kale that is the staple of the day I guess because it flourishes in the cooler climate. But on the bright side you've got the salmon, the raspberries, the whisky, the smokies and the herring (I know not up your mountain) and any of those would be a treat from time to time eh?

    Forgot to mention all that delicious lamb and mutton too which IS up your mountain!
    Last edited by MrsLurcherwalker; 08-07-2018 at 4:55 PM.
    Thumpers mum was right - if you can't find anything nice to say don't say anything at all!
    • cuddlymarm
    • By cuddlymarm 8th Jul 18, 5:56 PM
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    cuddlymarm
    Hi guys
    Mrs LW lamb is my favourite meat and the raspberries and whisky will definately perk up a more basic diet.
    Regarding the infrastructure being allowed to go to rack and ruin, the local councils are having the extra expenses of social care, etc put on to them which means there just isnít the money any more to keep the infrastructure up. I think they are going to have to start shouting louder to get their share from central government, especially since there wonít be any more money from the EU.
    Charity can only do so much. There are that many charities calling for your money and people can only do so much.
    Oh I better go
    Teas ready
    Cuddles
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