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  • FIRST POST
    • cuddlymarm
    • By cuddlymarm 12th Jun 18, 1:39 PM
    • 1,194Posts
    • 6,176Thanks
    cuddlymarm
    Prepping for Brexit thread
    • #1
    • 12th Jun 18, 1:39 PM
    Prepping for Brexit thread 12th Jun 18 at 1:39 PM
    Hi guys
    Iím pretty well resolved to the fact that Brexit is going to affect us all. I donít want this thread to be a good or bad, right or wrong type thing.
    Just a positive, what can we prepare to make life easier, less expensive, less disruptive when it does happen.

    My aims are to stock up on items I think are going to get more expensive. Also to try and save up an emergency fund ( that will be slow going as OH took early retirement due to illness) and Iím unemployed at the moment.

    So my aims are to work out what items need to be stocked up
    To look for a job
    To live as frugally as possible while eating healthily
    To make sure the savings we have already donít get touched

    So guys please feel free to join in and list anything you think may be affected. Or just to comment. That way we can help each other.

    Hope to hear from you all soon
    Cuddles
Page 35
    • Mr Topper
    • By Mr Topper 6th Aug 18, 5:01 PM
    • 2 Posts
    • 20 Thanks
    Mr Topper
    Hiya All, i came across this forum when looking for prepping for Brexit and have enjoyed reading some of your posts
    Now i am no expert but have been prepping for different situations for the past 7-8 years so have come across a few good and a few bad ideas along the way. One of the common themes that i keep coming across is - if you cant hold it, you don't own it, for example i think this is particularly relevant to money as people in Greece found out a few years ago when they couldn't get access to THEIR money! and when they could it was limited to 25 euro a day! Modern financial systems are just a number on a screen and nothing more, if that stops working for whatever reason then you don't own anything!
    From what iv'e seen on here though a few of you guys keep cash at home, i do this and i also invest in Silver Bullion, not to make a profit but as a reserve that i can physically hold.
    Iv'e also read on many a internet page that the Strategic Reserve of Food in this country is 3 days! and that is held by the supermarkets etc...so stocking up on a few items makes sense in my mind. Water especially! iv'e just been to the supermarket and they have completely run out of bottled water due to the hot weather and that's with no supply problems!
    Like is said at the beginning.... if you cant hold it, you don't own it!
    • Mr Topper
    • By Mr Topper 6th Aug 18, 5:10 PM
    • 2 Posts
    • 20 Thanks
    Mr Topper
    Why has Germany told its Citizens to prepare? And they are not the only country, Sweden has recently issued a Civil Defence pamphlet to all households, Finland and the Czech Republic have also warned their citizens to prepare...but for what?

    Just trying to look at the bigger picture
    • maryb
    • By maryb 6th Aug 18, 5:12 PM
    • 3,935 Posts
    • 48,942 Thanks
    maryb
    Worries about a resurgent Russia? Preparations in case of a terrorist attack on vital infrastructure?
    It doesn't matter if you are a glass half full or half empty sort of person. Keep it topped up! Cheers!
    • MrsLurcherwalker
    • By MrsLurcherwalker 6th Aug 18, 5:16 PM
    • 12,866 Posts
    • 177,756 Thanks
    MrsLurcherwalker
    Because both nations are 'feet on the ground practical' and they will see the sense in stocking up on what they may need? not running round like chickens with the fox outside the hen coop???
    Thumpers mum was right - if you can't find anything nice to say don't say anything at all!
    • dreaming
    • By dreaming 6th Aug 18, 5:23 PM
    • 711 Posts
    • 3,412 Thanks
    dreaming
    I know there is a lot of criticism regarding the government's perceived "inactivity" regarding Brexit, but I do believe that there will actually be a great deal of contingency planning going behind the scenes. Likewise with the major suppliers (especially food) - they will (I'm fairly confident) already be looking at alternative sources etc., although I also agree with others that there may be some reduction in the choice of foods we have been used to. Having worked in both local government and industry I know there is a lot of work that goes on in the background that it is not in anyone's interests to disclose too widely too soon. Even the recent leaked reports may not have been "leaks" at all, but a way of slowly cascading information to the public. Oh dear, maybe I have been in the sun too long and succumbing to conspiracy theories.
    What I'm trying to say is that it is unlikely to be as bad as some say it will, but possibly not as seamless as others propound. All I suggest is that we do what feels right for ourselves and our own families/communities with regards to whether, and what, we stockpile. After all, none of have a crystal ball to foretell the future, so for many of us it is at best an educated guess.
    • monnagran
    • By monnagran 6th Aug 18, 6:01 PM
    • 4,043 Posts
    • 54,511 Thanks
    monnagran
    I occasionally dip into this thread for a bit of a chuckle. I always enjoy the sight of people getting their knickers in a twist.
    Those of us born before the war and have managed to live through rationing, austerity, raging inflation, shortages and the rest are all probably heaving a resigned sigh and thinking 'here we go again'.

    No one enjoys the prospect of having to give up the cushy life we have come to expect, but Armageddon it ain't.

    I do feel very sorry for those who have no experience of making do and it isn't just the youngsters either. A lot of the population have grown up with a sense of entitlement which is not a good outlook on life in any sense.

    Yes, prices may go up. Do you remember how they rocketed when we joined the Common Market? It led to raging inflation in the seventies. Now they are expected to do the same as we leave. Someone is making money whatever the excuse.

    My personal prep for Brexit is to dig out my wartime recipe books, Justin of course, and making sure that I have the wherewithal to keep myself warm..... Duvets, blankets, hotwater bottles and the like.

    As to the rest, it is all speculation. No one knows where the axe will fall or what shortages there will be. No one in WW2 foresaw that onions would be worth more than gold..... OK, a slight exaggeration, but only slight.

    Altogether now......"WE WILL SURVIVE!"
    I believe that friends are quiet angels
    Who lift us to our feet when our wings
    Have trouble remembering how to fly.
    • Mrs Salad Dodger
    • By Mrs Salad Dodger 6th Aug 18, 6:12 PM
    • 1,283 Posts
    • 14,457 Thanks
    Mrs Salad Dodger
    Thanks for that monnagran I think my problem is the scaremongering in the press on a daily basis - I knew there was a reason I stopped getting newspapers or watching the news

    So thank you again for a reasoned & (useful to me) post. Re the onions - I saw an episode of Foyleís War where a ginormous onion was the raffle prize - now I understand

    MrsSD
    • mardatha
    • By mardatha 6th Aug 18, 7:46 PM
    • 15,322 Posts
    • 148,898 Thanks
    mardatha
    I think you're right but also those who lived before we joined the EU are likely to be older, be in receipt of a pension and have their houses paid off so not really in a position to be truly negatively affected by the serious consequences of Brexit. The younger, least well-off will be far more affected than the others.
    Originally posted by mattpaint
    Not really, some of us havent got bought houses but still pay rent on a fixed income. We will all be affected by rising food prices, you can't really single out any one group matt.
    Brilliant post monnagran!
    Last edited by mardatha; 06-08-2018 at 7:54 PM.
    • nannywindow
    • By nannywindow 6th Aug 18, 7:53 PM
    • 1,002 Posts
    • 13,565 Thanks
    nannywindow
    I don't have a crystal ball either but I shall do what I always do and prep for winter, illness etc.. I am under no illusion that prices will rise and probably the supermarkets will no doubt blame it on Brexit, whether that is the case or not. I shall only purchase the items that we use and not go stockpilling anything that we don't need or won't use as that would be false economy. No one knows what the future may bring but I wish we could all come together and just " let It Go " as it's now out of our hands. I for one am fed up of the " us " and "them " mentality.
    Failure is simply the opportunity to begin again, but this time more intelligently
    • MrsLurcherwalker
    • By MrsLurcherwalker 6th Aug 18, 8:53 PM
    • 12,866 Posts
    • 177,756 Thanks
    MrsLurcherwalker
    Chemicals and colours in foods eh? I rather think that EU legislation is the cause of many things being deemed not allowable in both the growing, processing and manufactured goods that are made with produce grown within the area that comes under EU rule.
    Thumpers mum was right - if you can't find anything nice to say don't say anything at all!
    • Primrose
    • By Primrose 6th Aug 18, 9:08 PM
    • 8,444 Posts
    • 29,665 Thanks
    Primrose
    I hate to say it, and I wouldn't enjoy it if it happened but maybe a period of shortages would do us all good and remind us that in material terms, compared with many other countries we,ve really never had it so good.

    The supermarkets are bulging with so many food choices it makes our heads spin. The water always flows even in a drought. The electricity rarely fails. Most people who want jobs have one, even if they don,t enjoy their work. We still have free speech and an NHS service even if it isnt perfect.

    I remember visiting the So Union just before Glasnost . People would queue for 3 hours for a pint of milk and a jar of jam. No choice of raspberry, strawberry or damson jam either. Just any old jam mixed together in the factory. Take it or leave it ! And you could ,t criticise the government either or your neighbour would report you and you wiuld lose your job and your housing.

    We'll get through whatever happens. The British are rather good at it i think, despite our politicians!
    • Mrs Salad Dodger
    • By Mrs Salad Dodger 6th Aug 18, 9:52 PM
    • 1,283 Posts
    • 14,457 Thanks
    Mrs Salad Dodger
    Hear, hear Primrose
    • Honey Bear
    • By Honey Bear 7th Aug 18, 11:05 AM
    • 5,404 Posts
    • 53,426 Thanks
    Honey Bear
    I hate to say it, and I wouldn't enjoy it if it happened but maybe a period of shortages would do us all good and remind us that in material terms, compared with many other countries we,ve really never had it so good.

    The supermarkets are bulging with so many food choices it makes our heads spin. The water always flows even in a drought. The electricity rarely fails. Most people who want jobs have one, even if they don,t enjoy their work. We still have free speech and an NHS service even if it isnt perfect.

    I remember visiting the So Union just before Glasnost . People would queue for 3 hours for a pint of milk and a jar of jam. No choice of raspberry, strawberry or damson jam either. Just any old jam mixed together in the factory. Take it or leave it ! And you could ,t criticise the government either or your neighbour would report you and you wiuld lose your job and your housing.

    We'll get through whatever happens. The British are rather good at it i think, despite our politicians!
    Originally posted by Primrose
    I've read the entire Forum Thread through and I think Primrose's post sums up quite a lot of the posters' attitudes. You're quite right, we have never had it so good. There is excessive supply which satisfies demand which is a very comfortable way to live. That is largely down to the fact that we are a member of the largest free-trade bloc in the world.

    That will not be the case on 30 March 2019 if we have No Deal.

    We will be the ONLY country in the world with no trade deals.

    We do not produce radioactive isotopes which which to treat cancer and without the regulatory required nuclear infrastructure that we currently do not have, we will not be allowed to import them. We do not have enough scientists who are qualified to manage the infrastructure required, either. They cannot be stockpiled.

    As a country we produce very little insulin. (The Prime Minister has Type 1 diabetes so she's fully aware of what that means.) It is pretty much all imported. It has a refrigerated shelf life of three months, so it, too, cannot be stockpiled.

    People who assume that our gas and electricity are not subject to the benefits of EU membership are quite wrong. Norway, for instance, is not in the EU but is in the Single Market and we will not be. We get a huge amount of gas from Norway as a previous poster pointed out - but we won't have a trade deal with Norway.

    When we have negotiated one, which could take years, Norway is not allowed to give a third country terms that are more favourable than the terms the EU has. At best, we might still be able to buy our gas from Norway on the same terms and conditions that we currently do.

    EDF is French-owned, and many of our water companies, rail companies and other electricity suppliers are at least partially owned by EU governments. They can charge us whatever they like when we are a Third Country.

    We survived the war largely because America stepped in and provided us with a great deal of support in the later years. It may have been politically expedient for the USA to do so - they were coming out of an incredibly severe depression which was so bad that American citizens lived in shanty towns and some went very hungry indeed. WW2 revitalized their economy and provided us with a vital lifeline via the North Atlantic Convoy. It was paid for by loans, which we finally finished repaying in the early 2000s. It took that long, so abundant was their help.

    The current American administration has made it as clear as it can that its policy is 'American First.' We will not be getting free or subsidised support from the USA, we will be paying a very high price indeed.


    It has been acknowledged that in order to fund the NHS taxes will have to rise.

    So far no announcements have been made about fisheries but fishermen and farmers are extremely worried about the future beyond 31 December 2020 - and that's if we get a transition period. Right now, according to Liam Fox, there's a 60% chance we're not going to, so farmers and the fishing industry are worried about their futures.

    It takes two and a half years to bring a newly born calf into milk. We no longer produce 100% of the dairy produce we consume, so shortages of milk, butter, cream and cheese will last for at least two and a half years, not a matter of days, weeks or months. Any dairy produce that makes it past the new border checks we were promised when we took back control of them will be very expensive indeed because of the nature of refrigerated transport costs.


    None of this is scare-mongering. It is exactly where we are a the moment and what worries me about this thread is that there is a belief that because thousands of people worked for years to resolveWe the Millenium Bug, and we survived WW2, we'll be fine.

    The trade deals we had with the rest of the world were defunct the minute we joined the EEC. None of them are extant.

    We produce less than 60% of the food we consume, and as detailed above, little or none of the life-saving medicines that hundreds and hundreds of thousands of people, if not millions, need every single day. We import a masssive amount of power, both gas and electricity from Europe.

    If anyone thinks that behind the scenes all of these issues are being addressed carefully by our government and there won't be a problem on 31 March 2019 or even 21 December 2020, I'm delighted for you.

    So far the Government's track record doesn't inspire me. Theresa May called a winnable election and lost her majority. She's appointed a new Brexit negotiator and had to side-line him because he's an idiot who shoots his mouth off. Liam Fox said the EU trade deal would be the easiest in history - and is now saying that there is a 60% chance we won't get one. David Davis said he didn't need to be particularly clever to negotiate on our behalf, which was worrying because the EU's negotiators know exactly what they're doing. A full year after the Referendum result was announced and six months into his new job David Davis said he hadn't considered the implications of our EHIC cards that make health insurance in Europe affordable for British holiday makers.

    Our ex-pat community has been hit by a 17% drop in the value of the pound and still don't know, more than two years after the Referendum result what their rights are in Europe. A great many of them, principally the older ones with no employment in the future but a fair few health problems are very seriously considering returning to the UK. Where are the flats or houses they will occupy?

    It's an irrelevance as to whether the EU is being intractable, or we have appointed nincompoops to the outward facing posts of Brexit Negotiator, Trade Envoy and Foreign Secretary. Whether I voted Leave or Remain isn't relevant either. This is not scare-mongering, this is where we are right now and it scares the pants off me.

    Keep calm and carry on won't cut the mustard this time.
    Last edited by Honey Bear; 07-08-2018 at 11:16 AM.
    Keeping it AF
    • Honey Bear
    • By Honey Bear 7th Aug 18, 11:17 AM
    • 5,404 Posts
    • 53,426 Thanks
    Honey Bear
    A List of Countries the U.K. has Free Trade Agreements and Preferential Trading Agreements with as a member of the E.U.
    __________________________________________________ __

    Next time somebody is trying to tell you that remaining in the EU is an insular way of seeing things and that leaving the EU somehow allows us to make own trade deals and trade with the rest of the world you might like to show them this list of trade deals we have right now as a member of the EU team.

    Of course, these are on top of the 27 free-trade deals we have with our EU partners and 4 free-trade deals we have with our EFTA colleagues (Norway, Iceland, Lichtenstein & Switzerland).

    All deals that the U.K. negotiated from a position of strength over 45 years within the world's most powerful trade negotiation team, the EU, and that's according to the US team.

    In trade negotiations, a very important part of your negotiation stance is the size of the market you can offer access to. The EU can name its price regarding safety, security and processes required by importers by in turn offering them access to a market of 512 million developed consumers for complying.

    Outside the EU, the U.K. will only be able to offer 65 million consumers, and that immediately gives us a much weaker hand in getting the standards we require. Foreign importers will simply be prepared to offer less for access to a smaller market.

    Less desire to trade with the U.K. means a lower need for Sterling and therefore the pound loses value, making foreign imports more expensive for British consumers to buy. Many foodstuffs, goods and services cannot be made or grown here, so we must pay more, or do without.

    The question isn't about the UK getting a deal, it's more to do with what those deals are like and how long the U.K. must sell and trade at a significant disadvantage whilst those inferior trade deals come into effect.

    Of course, after Brexit, the UK will be in direct competition with the powerful union of the EU and its firms. Since we are no longer a partner, they, and corporations all over the world, will be keen to seize our sales and market share, especially while we are so vulnerable.

    Nor are all trade deals the same. The simpler ones, worth less, or which see the U.K. desperate and somewhat over-a-barrel are quick, usually taking 2-3 years. The more valuable ones worth more take about a decade.

    The EU's trade deal with Canada (CETA) took 8 years, was goods only and required a Canadian trade negotiation team of 864 negotiators. The U.K. has less that 20 negotiators in total to negotiate goods and services deals with some 217 nations and territories across the world, and very little time to waste.

    The EU, on the other hand, has been building trade relationships since 1957, and we have been a part of this since 1973, some 45 years which has seen us deeply involved with our partners in building smoother supply chains, greater speed and security, higher levels of safety and more streamlined bureaucracy in all aspects of our global trade.

    Nor do they need a deal with us as much as we need a deal with them. The U.K. market accounts for only 2-3% of the EU's global sales, whereas the EU-Japan Free Trade Agreement just signed accounts for one-third of all global GDP.


    Types of EU trade agreement


    There are three main types of agreements:
    Customs Unions
    These eliminate customs duties in bilateral trade and establish a joint customs tariff for foreign importers

    Association Agreements, Stabilisation Agreements, (Deep and Comprehensive) Free Trade Agreements and Economic Partnership Agreements
    These remove or reduce customs tariffs in bilateral trade.

    Partnership and Cooperation Agreements
    These provide a general framework for bilateral economic relations, but leave customs tariffs as they are.


    EU Agreements in Place:
    Albania (Western Balkans)
    Stabilisation and Association Agreement
    In force since 2009

    Algeria
    Association Agreement
    In force since 01/09/2005

    Andorra
    Customs Union
    In force since 01/01/1991

    Armenia
    Partnership and Cooperation Agreement
    In force since 09/09/1999

    Azerbaijan
    Partnership and Cooperation Agreement
    In force since 1999

    Bosnia and Herzegovina (Western Balkans)
    Stabilisation and Association Agreement
    In force since 01/06/2015

    Botswana (SADC)
    Economic Partnership Agreement
    In force since 05/02/2018

    Chile
    Association Agreement and Additional Protocol
    In force since 01/03/2005

    Egypt
    Association Agreement
    In force since 01/06/2004

    Faroe Islands
    Agreement
    In force since 01/01/1997

    Georgia
    Association Agreement
    In force since 01/07/2016

    Iceland
    Economic Area Agreement
    In force since 1994

    Israel
    Association Agreement
    In force since 01/06/2000

    Jordan
    Association Agreement
    In force since 01/05/2002

    Kosovo (UNSCR 1244)
    Stabilisation and Association Agreement
    In force since 01/04/2016

    Lebanon
    Association Agreement
    In force since 01/04/2006

    Lesotho (SADC)
    Economic Partnership Agreement
    In force since 05/02/2018

    Macedonia, Former Yugoslav Republic of (Western Balkans)
    Stabilisation and Association Agreement
    In force since 01/04/2004

    Mexico
    Global Agreement
    In force since 01/10/2000

    Moldova
    Association Agreement
    In force since 01/07/2016

    Montenegro (Western Balkans)
    Stabilisation and Association Agreement
    In force since 01/05/2010

    Morocco
    Association Agreement
    In force since 01/03/2000

    Mozambique (SADC)
    Economic Partnership Agreement
    In force since 05/02/2018

    Namibia (SADC)
    Economic Partnership Agreement
    In force since 05/02/2018

    Norway
    Economic Area Agreement
    In force since 1994

    Palestinian Authority
    Interim Association Agreement
    In force since 01/07/1997

    Russia
    Partnership and Cooperation Agreement
    In force since 01/12/1997

    San Marino
    Customs Union
    In force since 01/04/2002

    Serbia (Western Balkans)
    Stabilisation and Association Agreement
    In force since 01/09/2013

    South Africa
    Economic Partnership Agreement
    In force since 05/02/2018

    South Korea
    Free Trade Agreement
    In force since 01/07/2016

    Swaziland (SADC)
    Economic Partnership Agreement
    In force since 05/02/2018

    Switzerland
    Agreement
    In force since 01/01/1973

    Syria
    Co-operation Agreement
    In force since 01/07/1977

    Tunisia
    Association Agreement
    In force since 01/03/1998

    Turkey
    Customs Union
    In force since 31/12/1995



    EU Agreements Partly in Place:


    These are countries and regions that have part (but not all) of their agreements in place with the EU. The agreement is fully applied when all parties have ratified the agreement.


    Antigua and Barbuda (CARIFORUM)
    Economic Partnership Agreement
    Provisionally applied since 2008

    Armenia
    Updated Partnership and Cooperation Agreement
    Provisionally applied since 06/2018

    Bahamas (CARIFORUM)
    Economic Partnership Agreement
    Provisionally applied since 2008

    Barbados (CARIFORUM)
    Economic Partnership Agreement
    Provisionally applied since 2008

    Belize (CARIFORUM)
    Economic Partnership Agreement
    Provisionally applied since 2008

    Botswana (SADC)
    Economic Partnership Agreement
    Provisionally applied since 10/10/2016

    Cameroon (Central Africa)
    Interim Economic Partnership Agreement
    Provisionally applied since 2014

    Canada
    Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA)
    Signed 30 October 2016, provisionally applied since 21/09/2017

    Colombia (with Ecuador and Peru)
    Trade Agreement
    Signed 26/07/2012, provisionally applied since 2013

    CŰte d'Ivoire (West Africa)
    Economic Partnership Agreement
    Provisionally applied since 03/09/2016

    Comoros (ESA)
    Economic Partnership Agreement
    Signed 08/2009, not yet provisionally applied

    Costa Rica (Central America)
    Association Agreement with a strong trade component
    Signed 29/06/2012, provisionally applied since 2013

    Cuba
    Political Dialogue and Cooperation Agreement
    Provisionally applied since 1/11/2017

    Dominica (CARIFORUM)
    Economic Partnership Agreement
    Provisionally applied since 2008

    Djibouti (ESA)
    Economic Partnership Agreement
    Signed 08/2009, not yet provisionally applied

    Dominican Republic (CARIFORUM)
    Economic Partnership Agreement
    Provisionally applied since 2008

    Ecuador (with Colombia and Peru)
    Trade Agreement
    Signed 26/07/2012, provisionally applied since 2013

    El Salvador (Central America)
    Association Agreement with a strong trade component
    Signed 29/06/2012, provisionally applied since 2013

    Eritrea (ESA) Economic Partnership Agreement
    Signed 08/2009, not yet provisionally applied

    Ethiopia (ESA)
    Economic Partnership Agreement
    Signed 08/2009, not yet provisionally applied

    Fiji (with Papua New Guinea)
    Interim Partnership Agreement
    Ratified by Papua New Guinea in May 2011

    Ghana (West Africa)
    Stepping stone Economic Partnership Agreement provisionally applied
    Provisionally applied since 15/12/2016

    Grenada (CARIFORUM)
    Economic Partnership Agreement
    Provisionally applied since 2008

    Guatemala (Central America)
    Association Agreement with a strong trade component
    Signed 29/06/2012, provisionally applied since 2013

    Guyana (CARIFORUM)
    Economic Partnership Agreement
    Provisionally applied since 2008

    Haiti (CARIFORUM)
    Economic Partnership Agreement
    Haitian ratification still pending

    Honduras (Central America)
    Association Agreement with a strong trade component
    Signed 29/06/2012, provisionally applied since 2013

    Jamaica (CARIFORUM)
    Economic Partnership Agreement
    Provisionally applied since 2008

    Kazakhstan
    Enhanced Partnership and Cooperation Agreement
    Provisionally applied since 01/05/2016

    Madagascar, Mauritius, the Seychelles, and Zimbabwe (ESA)
    Economic Partnership Agreement
    Signed 08/2009, provisionally applied since 2012

    Papua New Guinea and Fiji
    Interim Partnership Agreement
    Ratified by Papua New Guinea in May 2011

    Namibia (SADC)
    Economic Partnership Agreement
    Provisionally applied since 10/10/2016

    Nicaragua (Central America)
    Association Agreement with a strong trade component
    Signed 29/06/2012, provisionally applied since 2013

    Panama (Central America)
    Association Agreement with a strong trade component
    Signed 29/06/2012, provisionally applied since 2013

    Papua New Guinea (with Fiji)
    Interim Partnership Agreement
    Ratified by Papua New Guinea in May 2011

    Madagascar (ESA)
    Economic Partnership Agreement
    Signed 08/2009, provisionally applied since 06/2011

    Peru (with Colombia and Ecuador)
    Trade Agreement Signed 26/07/2012, provisionally applied since 2013

    South Africa
    Economic Partnership Agreement
    Provisionally applied since 10/10/2016

    St Kitts and Nevis (CARIFORUM)
    Economic Partnership Agreement
    Provisionally applied since 2008

    St Lucia (CARIFORUM)
    Economic Partnership Agreement
    Provisionally applied since 2008

    St Vincent and the Grenadines (CARIFORUM)
    Economic Partnership Agreement
    Provisionally applied since 2008

    Sudan (ESA)
    Economic Partnership Agreement
    Signed 08/2009, not provisionally applied yet

    Suriname (CARIFORUM)
    Economic Partnership Agreement
    Provisionally applied since 2008

    Trinidad and Tobago (CARIFORUM)
    Economic Partnership Agreement
    Provisionally applied since 2008

    Ukraine
    Deep and Comprehensive Free Trade Agreement.
    Associate Agreement Signed 29/05/2014, provisionally applied since 01/01/2016

    Zambia (ESA)
    Economic Partnership Agreement
    Signed 08/2009, not provisionally applied yet



    Agreements Pending:
    In some circumstances trade negotiations with a trade partner have been concluded, but have not been either signed or ratified yet. This means that although the negotiations have finished, no part of the agreement is in place yet.

    Burundi (EAC)
    Economic partnership Agreement
    Has not signed or ratified agreement

    Japan
    Economic partnership Agreement
    Negotiations started 01/03/2013, concluded December 2017, awaiting signature

    Kenya (EAC)
    Economic partnership Agreement
    Signed and ratified, provisional application when all EAC countries sign and ratify

    Rwanda (EAC)
    Economic partnership Agreement
    Signed, provisional application when all EAC countries sign and ratify

    Singapore
    Free Trade Agreement
    Subject to CJEU opinion 2/15, awaiting signature

    Tanzania (EAC)
    Economic partnership Agreement
    Has not signed or ratified agreement

    Uganda (EAC)
    Economic partnership Agreement
    Has not signed or ratified agreement

    Vietnam
    Free Trade Agreement
    Negotiations concluded December 2016, expected to enter into force in 2018



    Agreements Being Updated:
    The EU has trade agreements in place with these countries/regions, but both sides are now negotiating an update
    Azerbaijan
    Update of Partnership and Cooperation Agreement
    Negotiations began February 2017

    Chile
    Modernise trade part of Association Agreement
    Negotiations began 16/11/2017

    Mexico
    Modernisation of Global Agreement
    'Agreement in principle' on the trade part reached in April 2018

    Morocco
    Update of Association Agreement to create a Deep and Comprehensive Free Trade Area
    Negotiations began 01/03/2013, on hold since April 2014

    Tunisia
    Update of Association Agreement to create a Deep and Comprehensive Free Trade Area
    Negotiations began 12/10/2013



    Agreements Being Negotiated:
    Agreements currently under negotiation

    Argentina (Mercosur)
    Mercosur Association Agreement
    Negotiations resumed May 2010

    Australia
    Australia Agreement
    Negotiations launched in June 2018

    Bahrain (GCC)
    Free Trade Agreement
    Negotiations started 1990, suspended since 2008

    Brazil (Mercosur)
    Mercosur Association Agreement
    Negotiations resumed May 2010

    China
    EU-China investment agreement
    Negotiations started 21/11/2013

    India
    Free Trade Agreement
    Negotiations started 2007, last round in 2013

    Indonesia
    Free Trade Agreement
    Negotiations started 01/09/2016

    Kuwait (GCC)
    Free Trade Agreement
    Negotiations started 1990, suspended since 2008

    Malaysia
    Free Trade Agreement
    Negotiations started October 2010, paused since April 2012

    Myanmar
    Investment protection agreement
    Negotiations started 2015

    New Zealand
    New Zealand Agreement
    Negotiations launched in June 2018

    Oman (GCC)
    Free Trade Agreement
    Negotiations started 1990, suspended since 2008

    Paraguay (Mercosur)
    Mercosur Association Agreement
    Negotiations resumed May 2010

    Philippines
    Free Trade Agreement
    Negotiations started 01/12/2015

    Qatar (GCC)
    Free Trade Agreement
    Negotiations started 1990, suspended since 2008

    Saudi Arabia (GCC)
    Free Trade Agreement
    Negotiations started 1990, suspended since 2008

    Thailand
    Free Trade Agreement
    Negotiations started 01/03/2013, no negotiations scheduled since 2014

    United Arab Emirates (GCC)
    Free Trade Agreement
    Negotiations started 1990, suspended since 2008

    United States of America
    Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership
    Negotiations started 2013, paused until further notice 2016

    Uruguay (Mercosur)
    Mercosur Association Agreement
    Negotiations resumed May 2010

    Venezuela
    Mercosur Free Trade Agreement
    Suspended as Mercosur Member


    When the EU do a big trade deal they put in a clause that the country they have the deal with can't offer a better trade deal than they have with the EU to another territory. It's a pretty standard thing, the US writes the same clause into their trade deals. So, the very best we could hope for when doing trade deals with the Rest of the World is as good as we have now, but we're not even going to get that.
    Last edited by Honey Bear; 07-08-2018 at 2:08 PM.
    Keeping it AF
    • maryb
    • By maryb 7th Aug 18, 11:21 AM
    • 3,935 Posts
    • 48,942 Thanks
    maryb
    Dairy production, as you pointed out, has a lead time. As a result of decisions already taken there are cows in Europe which still need milking twice a day and that milk needs to find a market. France produces a lot of its electricity from nuclear power. That sort of generation is not very flexible. Just a couple of examples.

    In an ordinary everyday context we all recognise that it is a major problem for a business to lose a big regular customer. That still applies. Ordinary producers will still want to market their produce and won't easily or quickly be able to replace a market the size of the UK.

    It may be messy. No-one is saying it won't be potentially chaotic. It won't be permanent
    It doesn't matter if you are a glass half full or half empty sort of person. Keep it topped up! Cheers!
    • Honey Bear
    • By Honey Bear 7th Aug 18, 12:14 PM
    • 5,404 Posts
    • 53,426 Thanks
    Honey Bear
    No-one is saying it won't be potentially chaotic. It won't be permanent
    Originally posted by maryb
    It could be 50 years before we see the economic benefits of Leaving according to Jacob Rees-Mogg, or if you prefer a businessman's perspective - 100 years. Both of them supported and campaigned for Leave. But as you say, it's not permanent.

    Once prices go up they do not come down. The increases in the cost of living will be permanent, and if the border control discussions and planning taking place right now are to be believed, EU members will not want their produce sitting in a lorry park for four days while we check paperwork. One truckload of fruit, veg, meat and dairy going off will be the only one each EU's exporter will be prepared to accept because food margins are low, trucks are an expensive investment, and the drivers' time expensive. After that, they will simply not both trying to bring us any food at all. There will be a glut in Europe, prices will drop and next year the farmers will produce less.

    See here for WTO tariffs on beef and lamb. There are no doubt other documents readily available for other products such as medicines (if we have the regulatory infrastructure in place that makes importing them legal). We will be paying tariffs on imported food until we can do trade deals but we won't be getting better terms than anyone who currently has a trade deal with the EU. So that's not permanent, but it will significantly increase the price of 40% of our food.


    And I for one am praying neither I, nor anyone I care about, gets diagnosed with cancer in the forseeable future, because it'll be a fatal diagnosis with No Deal. That may not be permanent, and for the majority of people that's fine. For those currently taking shedloads of imported drugs because they had bowel cancer a couple of years ago, it's not so comforting that one day, some time in the future, we'll be able to import radioactive isotopes again if it comes back. Don't get breast cancer, either, obviously. Does any on this thread know how long does it take to train nuclear scientists?

    You can be absolutely certain that all of the MPs on the front bench have private medical insurance, and that they can afford to fly to anywhere they can get treated. I can't, but maybe others on this thread can. If not, better start saving. It won't be permanent, but it might taka few years to do these trade deals, so stay well until then.

    We won't be flying to Europe, because the Open Skies agreement ends with our No Deal departure from the EU. Michael O'Leary has been warning about this for over two years, so it's not news.
    Last edited by Honey Bear; 07-08-2018 at 2:10 PM.
    Keeping it AF
    • puttee
    • By puttee 7th Aug 18, 12:19 PM
    • 15 Posts
    • 48 Thanks
    puttee
    As others have pointed out, nearly everything is speculation at the moment as negotiations are ongoing and nobody knows the outcome. It is useful I find in knowing what is speculation and what will actually be in force if various things happen.

    One topic that seems very fuzzy is the post-Brexit tariff situation with some wildly different opinions and views. Some assume that we will be absolutely free to do as we wish, and I think some politicians have led people to believe this. But it is rather more complicated than that. There is a good short piece in Full Fact (there are lots of other sources of this info too) which I have found useful in better understanding what one outcome we might have to face as a country.

    https://fullfact.org/economy/post-brexit-trade-tariffs/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIjdH1oOba3AIVCSjTCh3mqgGrEAAYASA AEgI_WvD_BwE


    It is a difficult topic, but I think the more we inform ourselves the better.



    HTH
    • MrsLurcherwalker
    • By MrsLurcherwalker 7th Aug 18, 12:26 PM
    • 12,866 Posts
    • 177,756 Thanks
    MrsLurcherwalker
    We'll get what we get, and we'll have to cope with it because IT is what we'll have. I'm not into the politics just the practicalities and because we're British and not afraid of some hard work and tough times I STILL maintain that we will all as a nation rally round and MAKE THE BEST OF IT THAT WE CAN!

    You can spread doom and gloom and dire forecasts until you run out of breath and I will still feel the same way because I've been cold, hungry and unhappy before and survived what life in all it's uncaring way can toss in my path, and I KNOW I CAN DO IT AGAIN!

    I will NOT be afraid, I will get on with it and as said before like a tired old record I will make the best of it that I can!!!
    Thumpers mum was right - if you can't find anything nice to say don't say anything at all!
    • lessonlearned
    • By lessonlearned 7th Aug 18, 12:44 PM
    • 10,787 Posts
    • 69,929 Thanks
    lessonlearned
    Mrs LW you are right as always.

    Whilst I'm not an ostrich and I fully appreciate that we may not be in for an easy ride I genuinely believe that all this doom and gloom mongering does no good at all. Project Fear and all that is just a sheer waste of time and energy.

    I'm a roll up your sleeves and get stuck in kind of gal, always was, always will be.

    What we need is for everyone to grow a backbone, stop whinging and start getting their heads round how they are going to not only survive but thrive. How they are going to look after themselves, their loved ones and maybe help their communities where they can.

    I too have been poor, cold and hungry. So what ......it didnt kill me. But what it did do was give me the drive, ambition and determination to build myself a decent life. A determination which I still have to this day.

    Am I going to let Project Fear reduce me to a quivering wreck, whimpering in the corner.

    Absolutely not!!!! I am no quitter. I'm going to get ready and meet the challenges that I face head on. Same as always.
    Last edited by lessonlearned; 07-08-2018 at 12:49 PM.
    • MrsLurcherwalker
    • By MrsLurcherwalker 7th Aug 18, 1:12 PM
    • 12,866 Posts
    • 177,756 Thanks
    MrsLurcherwalker
    LessonLearned my take on life in general is that every second wasted in anger, every second spent in thinking 'what if?' and every second spent in fear of something that we can't even begin to guess the outcome of is a second wasted when I could be doing something positive to make my life better and make slightly more sure of my own control over my future. I too am not a quitter, certainly not a quitter before the event and if I find things after the event hard well, I'm not a quitter then either!
    Thumpers mum was right - if you can't find anything nice to say don't say anything at all!
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