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  • FIRST POST
    • Ajh91
    • By Ajh91 17th May 18, 9:22 PM
    • 7Posts
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    Ajh91
    Why is my partner paying csa
    • #1
    • 17th May 18, 9:22 PM
    Why is my partner paying csa 17th May 18 at 9:22 PM
    Hi Iím wondering if anyone can help or shed any light on mine and my partners situation...
    My partner has 2 children from a previous marriage, I also have 2 children from a previous marriage, and we also have a son together, because we live together my partner helps pay for my children and obviously our son together.
    We have been together for 4 years and have always had his 2 daughters 4 nights 1 week, and 2 nights another week, which works out half the time, which is joint custody...when they are here my partner obviously pays for their needs(food clothes travel etc),
    He pays his ex wife csa of £50 a week.. correct me if Iím wrong but for the life of me I cannot understand why he is paying anything?! He has them half the time so he shouldnít have to pay when they are at their mums? If thatís the case why isnít she paying him when they are here? She also claims child tax credits and child benefit for the children so she is rolling in it..
    surely it canít be right that he should pay anything when it works out half the time he has the children
Page 1
    • iammumtoone
    • By iammumtoone 17th May 18, 9:29 PM
    • 5,636 Posts
    • 11,443 Thanks
    iammumtoone
    • #2
    • 17th May 18, 9:29 PM
    • #2
    • 17th May 18, 9:29 PM
    always had his 2 daughters 4 nights 1 week, and 2 nights another week, which works out half the time,
    Originally posted by Ajh91
    4+2 = 6, there are 14 nights in the fortnight you are referring to, by what calculation is that half the time?
    • Kim kim
    • By Kim kim 17th May 18, 9:30 PM
    • 2,270 Posts
    • 3,370 Thanks
    Kim kim
    • #3
    • 17th May 18, 9:30 PM
    • #3
    • 17th May 18, 9:30 PM
    I don!!!8217;t know if it!!!8217;s relevanr to CSA, but you don!!!8217;t have them half them time. You have them 6 days out of 14.
    • Ajh91
    • By Ajh91 17th May 18, 9:35 PM
    • 7 Posts
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    Ajh91
    • #4
    • 17th May 18, 9:35 PM
    • #4
    • 17th May 18, 9:35 PM
    sorry 1 day less than half the time... we also have them many other odd nights/weeks here and there. I just donít see how it can be right
    • Ajh91
    • By Ajh91 17th May 18, 9:40 PM
    • 7 Posts
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    Ajh91
    • #5
    • 17th May 18, 9:40 PM
    • #5
    • 17th May 18, 9:40 PM
    I!!!8217;ll add that my ex has my children 6 nights a month and pays me exactly the same amount that my partner pays his ex
    • iammumtoone
    • By iammumtoone 17th May 18, 9:44 PM
    • 5,636 Posts
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    iammumtoone
    • #6
    • 17th May 18, 9:44 PM
    • #6
    • 17th May 18, 9:44 PM
    sorry 1 day less than half the time... we also have them many other odd nights/weeks here and there. I just donít see how it can be right
    Originally posted by Ajh91
    that one day makes the difference. If it was half over the year (perhaps you need to start keeping notes of the days they do stay and tally it up after a year) then it would make it shared cared care. The mother would have to pay csa to the father and the father to the mother so in the case of one parent earning more than the other it could still work out that one has to pay the other doesn't.
    • iammumtoone
    • By iammumtoone 17th May 18, 9:46 PM
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    iammumtoone
    • #7
    • 17th May 18, 9:46 PM
    • #7
    • 17th May 18, 9:46 PM
    I!!!8217;ll add that my ex has my children 6 nights a month and pays me exactly the same amount that my partner pays his ex
    Originally posted by Ajh91
    the amount goes on earnings as well as time spent at the other house so its possible this could be correct.
    • Ajh91
    • By Ajh91 17th May 18, 9:54 PM
    • 7 Posts
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    Ajh91
    • #8
    • 17th May 18, 9:54 PM
    • #8
    • 17th May 18, 9:54 PM
    Do they take into account your outgoings though? I donít think my partner actually does earn more than his ex as she is a police officer. But if she is claiming child tax and child benefits also as well as her wage, my partner provides for 5 children so surely they should take all that into account?
    • iammumtoone
    • By iammumtoone 17th May 18, 10:03 PM
    • 5,636 Posts
    • 11,443 Thanks
    iammumtoone
    • #9
    • 17th May 18, 10:03 PM
    • #9
    • 17th May 18, 10:03 PM
    Do they take into account your outgoings though? I donít think my partner actually does earn more than his ex as she is a police officer. But if she is claiming child tax and child benefits also as well as her wage, my partner provides for 5 children so surely they should take all that into account?
    Originally posted by Ajh91
    They don't take into account outgoings but do take into account your partner has another child (the one that is his, not the other two in the household).

    Tax credits are nothing to do with csa calculations. I am not sure but I think with two children shared care it is possible for each parent to claim for one child tax credits, how this would work in your situation with claiming for two children tax credits (your child together plus one shared care) I dont know but if you determine you do have the children half the year this is something you could look into (how involved the mother has to be in this situation with her agreement I don't know).
    • jimd-f
    • By jimd-f 18th May 18, 9:37 AM
    • 158 Posts
    • 74 Thanks
    jimd-f
    he does not have them half the time if he has them 4 nights one week and 2 nights the next. that is 6 nights a fortnight so less than half.
    make sure he has told CMS this so he gets the full reduction he is due on his assessment.
    also make sure they know about the 3 children currently in your household.
    child benefit is normally paid to the parent who is the prime carer so in your partners exs case she will get CHIB for 2 children and you will get this for 3 children.
    tax credits are awarded based on the family income so it is possible your partners ex is not "rolling in it" but struggling and the child support payments are an important part of her total household income.
    • HoneyNutLoop
    • By HoneyNutLoop 18th May 18, 3:48 PM
    • 496 Posts
    • 388 Thanks
    HoneyNutLoop
    Thereís a bit of inaccurate info in this thread.

    To give the correct info, youíd need to say when your partnerís and your case began. It may be that what your ex pays is being calculated under a different scheme then what your partner pays, or that there are other differences in their circumstances meaning they would pay different amounts or one or both calculations could be wrong.

    However, some things to note:

    1) equal day to day care only results in no requirement for either parent to pay maintenance under the scheme administered by CMS, first introduced in 2012 for certain specific cases. Under the 2 older schemes, one parent must be assessed as the non-resident parent even if care is share equally. 6 nights out of 14 is not counted as equal care under any of the schemes however.
    2) Under none of the 3 schemes do they calculate an amount for both parents to pay each other for the same child for the same period of time. In an equal day to day care situation, either one parent will be deemed the non-resident parent or neither, depending on which scheme your on.
    3) outgoings were only taken into account under the original scheme, which closed to new applications in 2003. Even then it was only certain specific outgoings.
    4) tax credits are treated wildly differently under each of the 3 schemes. Depending on which your on will depend if itís counted as income when working out maintenance.
    5) step children living in the same household as the non-resident parent are taking into account in some shape or form under all 3 schemes.
    I often use a tablet to post, so sometimes my posts will have random letters inserted, or entirely the wrong word if autocorrect is trying to wind me up. Hopefully you'll still know what I mean.
    • Ajh91
    • By Ajh91 18th May 18, 6:05 PM
    • 7 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    Ajh91
    If she can afford to go on 3 holidays a year and my partner canít afford to buy them new clothes then yes she is rolling in it.,csa is to help towards things like that so in my opinion he shouldnít be giving her anything if he is buying all the things they need aswel as csa payments and the amount of time we have them.
    I fully agree with child maintenance donít get me wrong, but when they take the mick thatís when it starts to get rediculous.
    • Ajh91
    • By Ajh91 18th May 18, 6:12 PM
    • 7 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    Ajh91
    Oh and the holidays a year are without the children... plus we have them half of every school holiday
    • HoneyNutLoop
    • By HoneyNutLoop 18th May 18, 7:54 PM
    • 496 Posts
    • 388 Thanks
    HoneyNutLoop
    If you think the calculation is wrong, get your partner to call the CSA/CMS (as appropriate) to discuss it and make sure they have all the relevant info. Or get him to write in to authorise you as his representative so you can call in to discuss it.

    If you know they have all the correct info and the amount is legally correct, and are simply venting at the system, thatís fine. However, for your own sake youíd be best finding a way to make peace with it. Itís not worth letting it knaw at you.

    Assuming you are on the 2003 system, based on how long you and your partner have been together, for him to pay £50 a week based on the circumstances you describe, the net income used in the calculation would be around £580 a week. If your household receives working and/or child tax credits and your partner is the greater earner of the two of you, that income will be included in the figure used.

    If the above income sounds wrong, then a call to the CSA is worthwhile.
    I often use a tablet to post, so sometimes my posts will have random letters inserted, or entirely the wrong word if autocorrect is trying to wind me up. Hopefully you'll still know what I mean.
    • C_Mababejive
    • By C_Mababejive 18th May 18, 8:16 PM
    • 10,496 Posts
    • 9,440 Thanks
    C_Mababejive
    Doesnt he want to contribute to the upkeep of his children ? if not,who should pay it? Is HE objecting or questioning it also?
    Feudal Britain needs land reform. 70% of the land is "owned" by 1 % of the population and at least 50% is unregistered (inherited by landed gentry). Thats why your slave box costs so much..
    • Barny1979
    • By Barny1979 18th May 18, 8:42 PM
    • 4,103 Posts
    • 44,863 Thanks
    Barny1979
    There is the risk that the payments could go up?
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