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  • FIRST POST
    • sevenhills
    • By sevenhills 17th May 18, 12:13 PM
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    sevenhills
    Supermarket tyre gauge
    • #1
    • 17th May 18, 12:13 PM
    Supermarket tyre gauge 17th May 18 at 12:13 PM
    What type of equipment is used to check and inflate tyres at supermarkets?
    My employers has a large cylinder with compressor motor, and I am thinking its totally unsuitable for what we do, just checking and inflating tyres.
    I want my employer to move their gauge/inflator, and I want to be able tell them the type and cost of what they need.

Page 1
    • bigisi
    • By bigisi 17th May 18, 12:39 PM
    • 278 Posts
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    bigisi
    • #2
    • 17th May 18, 12:39 PM
    • #2
    • 17th May 18, 12:39 PM
    I'm sure they'll love you for that!
    • AndyMc.....
    • By AndyMc..... 17th May 18, 12:45 PM
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    AndyMc.....
    • #3
    • 17th May 18, 12:45 PM
    • #3
    • 17th May 18, 12:45 PM
    There!!!8217;s an airline attached to a compressor and at the other end a tyre inflation attachment. They cost upwards of 20 of a diy one.
    Hi there! Weve had to remove your signature. Please check the Forum Rules if youre unsure why its been removed and, if still unsure, email forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com
    • sevenhills
    • By sevenhills 17th May 18, 1:38 PM
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    sevenhills
    • #4
    • 17th May 18, 1:38 PM
    • #4
    • 17th May 18, 1:38 PM
    There!!!8217;s an airline attached to a compressor and at the other end a tyre inflation attachment. They cost upwards of 20 of a diy one.
    Originally posted by AndyMc.....

    I assume the supermarkets use a large version of this one, upwards of 10, without a large air storage cylinder.
    I would be wanting one connected to the mains electricity, not 12v


    https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Rolson-200PSI-Mini-Air-Compressor-Black-Air-Tyre-Wheel-Car-New/361265540066?hash=item541d1aabe2:g:rjYAAOxyuR5TXvG o[/QUOTE]
    Last edited by sevenhills; 17-05-2018 at 1:41 PM.

    • facade
    • By facade 17th May 18, 5:35 PM
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    facade
    • #5
    • 17th May 18, 5:35 PM
    • #5
    • 17th May 18, 5:35 PM
    I can't think of anything more suitable for a business that checks and inflates tyres than an airline connected to a tank and compressor.
    I want to go back to The Olden Days, when every single thing that I can think of was better.....

    (except air quality and Medical Science )
    • sevenhills
    • By sevenhills 17th May 18, 5:50 PM
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    sevenhills
    • #6
    • 17th May 18, 5:50 PM
    • #6
    • 17th May 18, 5:50 PM
    I can't think of anything more suitable for a business that checks and inflates tyres than an airline connected to a tank and compressor.
    Originally posted by facade

    The last time I use that type at work; I parked beside it, someone switched it on, and then wondered why it did not work.
    I guess that was because the compressor had to pressurise the 300lt tank first.


    I didn't wait.

    • Jackmydad
    • By Jackmydad 17th May 18, 5:51 PM
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    Jackmydad
    • #7
    • 17th May 18, 5:51 PM
    • #7
    • 17th May 18, 5:51 PM
    And all these years I thought there were a couple of people in the back of the shed somewhere winding the handles on a big pair of bellows.
    Technology eh? What will they think of next?

    I haven't seen one for a bit, but anyone remember those self contained compressors that mounted on the wall, and you paid 20p or something to blow your tyres up?
    "Luck happens where hard work meets opportunity"
    • facade
    • By facade 17th May 18, 6:16 PM
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    facade
    • #8
    • 17th May 18, 6:16 PM
    • #8
    • 17th May 18, 6:16 PM
    The last time I use that type at work; I parked beside it, someone switched it on, and then wondered why it did not work.
    I guess that was because the compressor had to pressurise the 300lt tank first.


    I didn't wait.
    Originally posted by sevenhills



    The tank and compressor need sizing for the job.


    If you want to blow up 3 bicycle tyres a day, a footpump will be fine.
    300 lorry tyres a day and you are going to need that 300litre tank and a big pump to feed it.
    Places with a 300litre tank normally use the compressed air for many other jobs than just blowing up tyres, and usually turn the pump on first thing in the morning.


    I have a baby 8 litre tank with a 240V compressor on top for blowing up tyres, takes about 30 seconds to fill the tank, and then it will top up the tyres in no time compared to the 12V pump. It takes a while to inflate a 205/16 from flat though.
    I want to go back to The Olden Days, when every single thing that I can think of was better.....

    (except air quality and Medical Science )
    • sevenhills
    • By sevenhills 17th May 18, 7:06 PM
    • 1,334 Posts
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    sevenhills
    • #9
    • 17th May 18, 7:06 PM
    • #9
    • 17th May 18, 7:06 PM
    The tank and compressor need sizing for the job.
    Places with a 300litre tank normally use the compressed air for many other jobs than just blowing up tyres, and usually turn the pump on first thing in the morning.
    Originally posted by facade

    They have less than 100 vehicles using the depot, vans and cars. The compressor is solely for checking tyres, they don't do anything else.
    Which is why I expect to tell them the 300 litre tank is overkill, and they need a smaller one or just a dedicated electric pump.

    • Car 54
    • By Car 54 17th May 18, 7:33 PM
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    Car 54
    They have less than 100 vehicles using the depot, vans and cars. The compressor is solely for checking tyres, they don't do anything else.
    Which is why I expect to tell them the 300 litre tank is overkill, and they need a smaller one or just a dedicated electric pump.
    Originally posted by sevenhills
    It may be overkill, but is it doing any harm? Why would they want to spend money on something smaller?
    • forgotmyname
    • By forgotmyname 17th May 18, 7:46 PM
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    forgotmyname
    The last time I use that type at work; I parked beside it, someone switched it on, and then wondered why it did not work.
    I guess that was because the compressor had to pressurise the 300lt tank first.


    I didn't wait.
    Originally posted by sevenhills
    It didn't work because the previous user used all the air stored in the tank. It doesnt need to run to use it. It needs to run to pressurise the tank and then it shuts off.

    It only needs to reach the same pressure as your trying to inflate your tyre to. It maybe a 150 - 300psi tank, but if its got 32psi stored then you can inflate your tyre to 32psi. If it leaks or the previous user emptied the tank then you need to wait for some pressure to build up.

    The forecourt items are the same but in a box. The storage maybe smaller but as you say its used for a lot of vehicles then a large storage tank is better suited to the task.

    Try inflating a truck tyre with a standard forecourt item, it may not be able to reach a high enough pressure for a start.
    Punctuation, Spelling and Grammar will be used sparingly. Due to rising costs of inflation.

    My contribution to MSE. Other contributions will only be used if they cost me nothing.

    Due to me being a tight git.
    • sevenhills
    • By sevenhills 17th May 18, 8:53 PM
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    sevenhills
    It may be overkill, but is it doing any harm? Why would they want to spend money on something smaller?
    Originally posted by Car 54

    It didn't work because the previous user used all the air stored in the tank.
    Originally posted by forgotmyname

    I used it for the first time in years, it was around 10am, the other vehicles would have been in the yard at around 8/9am.
    It was locked away, not how you want it if you want people to check their tyres.
    This 300 litre tank is very large, and is in the wrong place; it needs moving and it needs to be automatic and switched on 24/7
    It may be cheaper to buy a new smaller unit, and house it in a secure purpose build place.

    • sevenhills
    • By sevenhills 17th May 18, 8:56 PM
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    sevenhills
    Try inflating a truck tyre with a standard forecourt item, it may not be able to reach a high enough pressure for a start.
    Originally posted by forgotmyname

    Lots of health n safety issues around inflating very large tyres

    • forgotmyname
    • By forgotmyname 18th May 18, 12:52 AM
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    forgotmyname
    Yes ive been in a tyre shop when a commercial tyre exploded and everyone in the area came outside to see what the bang was.

    The compressor is automatic and you can leave it on 24/7 your company choose not to for whatever reason. They would probably do the same for any compressor.

    It fills to the tank to 100 - 150psi (generally) and then shuts off until the pressure drops through leakage or through use.

    Far quicker to check tyres using a compressor with a tank than a compressor without one.

    You appear to want them to spend thousands of to get something they already have, which costs far less.
    Punctuation, Spelling and Grammar will be used sparingly. Due to rising costs of inflation.

    My contribution to MSE. Other contributions will only be used if they cost me nothing.

    Due to me being a tight git.
    • bertiewhite
    • By bertiewhite 18th May 18, 8:23 AM
    • 1,178 Posts
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    bertiewhite
    I'd like to know who calibrates all the tyre pressure gauges in use at various supermarkets, tyre centres & garages in the UK.

    In a previous job, I had to test and (usually) re-calibrate various types of gauges on a yearly basis and a large percentage of them were found to be reading incorrectly.
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