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    • restless6
    • By restless6 16th May 18, 7:43 PM
    • 374Posts
    • 354Thanks
    restless6
    Dogs in rented houses
    • #1
    • 16th May 18, 7:43 PM
    Dogs in rented houses 16th May 18 at 7:43 PM
    Hi
    I am looking for a house to rent but all adverts say no pets.
    I have a Labrador - do you think any landlord would ever accept a dog ?
    I emailed one agent to ask if it was possible in a house I liked but they said no.
    I wouldn’t know how to contact the landlord directly .
Page 2
    • SamJ35
    • By SamJ35 17th May 18, 10:45 AM
    • 16 Posts
    • 7 Thanks
    SamJ35
    We rent with 2 (albeit small) dogs in a private rented 2 bed, and we've lived in 2 properties with them.

    Our approach was when looking online, if there was no specific statement in the listing that pets were not allowed, we would contact agent and after stating that we are interested in the property and immediately disclose up front about the dogs. The agent would usually say they would have to check with LL, or in some cases they would already know the landlord's stance. That would help with filtering straight away and avoid wasting our own time and the agents time. Some said they would require a larger deposit - some have no problems whatsoever and just standard deposit required.

    Keep an eye out for properties with gardens or outdoor space - sometimes a LL is more open to pets if a garden is available as they know the 'business' will be done outside (if appropriately house trained of course!). We have a private garden with our 2 bed in London and its a life saver - couldn't imagine renting with dogs without a garden.

    Keep looking and keep chasing those agents. At one point I thought it would be impossible (agents asking 'do you NEED to keep the dogs' - as if just getting rid of them was an option), but it can work out!
    • Red-Squirrel
    • By Red-Squirrel 17th May 18, 12:32 PM
    • 2,665 Posts
    • 7,141 Thanks
    Red-Squirrel
    I believe that larger deposits for pet friendly rentals are soon to be banned (but OK for now), a cap of 6 weeks rent is going to be introduced. I was surprised when I read that, as it seems to penalise pet owners, because additional 'pet deposits' will apparently not be allowed. The article that I read, made the point that landlords can charge higher rents for tenants with pets, but that isn't particularly helpful for the tenant. Although I must admit that we don't allow pets, we recently had a flea infestation with our own dog, and it took about 3 months to get rid of them. The problem wasn't the fleas on the dog, it was with the carpets and upholstery. He now gets two flea treatments, the regular one which kills fleas, and now also 'program' which stops them breeding, so if the first method fails, it will be far easier to control the infestation (in fact, it will get to an infestation stage). Although that was the first time in over 12 years of owning a dog, but it was bad enough in our own home, it would have been a nightmare in one of our investment properties.
    Originally posted by chucknorris

    Aren't you lucky to have the choice to have your dog though? Shame you want to deny that to others.
    • Red-Squirrel
    • By Red-Squirrel 17th May 18, 12:33 PM
    • 2,665 Posts
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    Red-Squirrel
    Unpopular though it may be to say it, some dogs really smell, particularly labradors.

    We have owned cars that have had dogs in them, and despite our best efforts, those vehicles kept reminding us of the fact throughout our ownership. It wasn't nice.

    Frankly, I wouldn't want anything to do with renting a property that had had a lab in it, and that's coming from someone who used to have ferrets as pets!
    Originally posted by Davesnave
    Would you also not buy a property that had dogs living in it previously then?
    • Cakeguts
    • By Cakeguts 17th May 18, 12:58 PM
    • 4,363 Posts
    • 6,241 Thanks
    Cakeguts
    We have a property that we have let in the last couple of weeks. It has a no pet policy. The latest tenant has a dog. We accpted them with the dog. The tenant before them had a dog. We can choose whether to let to someone with a dog or not. It depends on the dog.

    I would suggest that anyone in this position phones the agent about each individual property and doesn't just accept what is in the advert on the internet site.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 17th May 18, 2:00 PM
    • 25,035 Posts
    • 92,557 Thanks
    Davesnave
    Would you also not buy a property that had dogs living in it previously then?
    Originally posted by Red-Squirrel
    Nothing so small would put me off buying the right house, but buying's different, isn't it?

    This house had 3 dogs in it just prior to our arrival. First thing we did was use the carpets as ground cover in the garden, then we disinfected the concrete floors. The next step was to change the colour of many rooms so that we could live without too many psychedelic experiences for a year or two.

    But ultimately none of that mattered, because we later tore down all the ceilings, moved half a dozen walls, extended, replastered, re-woodworked and reroofed, so to be honest there is precious little left of whatever we bought!
    'It's a terrible thing to wait until you're ready…..Generally speaking, now is as good a time as any.' Hugh Lawrie.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 17th May 18, 2:13 PM
    • 25,035 Posts
    • 92,557 Thanks
    Davesnave
    . It depends on the dog.

    I would suggest that anyone in this position phones the agent about each individual property and doesn't just accept what is in the advert on the internet site.
    Originally posted by Cakeguts
    I agree, it does depend on the dog.....and the owner(s)

    It also helps to make personal contact, face to face.

    When we needed to rent 9 years ago, we knew what it would sound like if we just rang and said: " We've 2 cats and a couple of ferrets," so we went to every agency in person. Within 24 hours we had a choice of 3 houses, none of them perhaps the best on offer decoratively, but not complete dumps or in dodgy areas.
    'It's a terrible thing to wait until you're ready…..Generally speaking, now is as good a time as any.' Hugh Lawrie.
    • Murphybear
    • By Murphybear 17th May 18, 2:54 PM
    • 3,582 Posts
    • 7,355 Thanks
    Murphybear
    We rent with one cat and haven!!!8217;t generally had a problem. Our last property was a farm and they had a clause in the contract that we could have a cat but would have to get the carpets professionally cleaned which we did as we didn!!!8217;t want a rip off clean by the Ll. We have seen a lot of properties advertise that ll will accept cats but not dogs. I assume that this is because the agency/ll perceive that dogs are worse than cats. I!!!8217;ve never had a dog so can!!!8217;t say.
    • chucknorris
    • By chucknorris 17th May 18, 3:19 PM
    • 9,548 Posts
    • 14,336 Thanks
    chucknorris
    Aren't you lucky to have the choice to have your dog though? Shame you want to deny that to others.
    Originally posted by Red-Squirrel
    Luck had nothing to do with it.
    Chuck Norris can kill two stones with one bird
    The only time Chuck Norris was wrong was when he thought he had made a mistake
    Chuck Norris puts the "laughter" in "manslaughter".
    After running injuries I now mostly hike, gym classes and weight training (also a bit of cycling and swimming), less impact on my joints.
    • chucknorris
    • By chucknorris 17th May 18, 3:27 PM
    • 9,548 Posts
    • 14,336 Thanks
    chucknorris

    I would suggest that anyone in this position phones the agent about each individual property and doesn't just accept what is in the advert on the internet site.
    Originally posted by Cakeguts
    We have found that this sometimes works for us when we rent a holiday cottage, we send a photo of him, and explain that he doesn't have any issues, and explain that he knows that he is not allowed on furniture. Although I do accept it is entirely the owners choice, some might have had issues with dogs in the past.
    Chuck Norris can kill two stones with one bird
    The only time Chuck Norris was wrong was when he thought he had made a mistake
    Chuck Norris puts the "laughter" in "manslaughter".
    After running injuries I now mostly hike, gym classes and weight training (also a bit of cycling and swimming), less impact on my joints.
    • FBaby
    • By FBaby 17th May 18, 6:05 PM
    • 16,681 Posts
    • 41,268 Thanks
    FBaby
    I'd advise that you might want to look for places to rent that haven't just been decorated/re-carpeted but are maybe a little more dated.
    • missprice
    • By missprice 17th May 18, 7:37 PM
    • 3,341 Posts
    • 106,214 Thanks
    missprice
    We have found that this sometimes works for us when we rent a holiday cottage, we send a photo of him, and explain that he doesn't have any issues, and explain that he knows that he is not allowed on furniture. Although I do accept it is entirely the owners choice, some might have had issues with dogs in the past.
    Originally posted by chucknorris
    I rent holiday cottages In the UK for my holidays. I used various sites that I can filter for pets allowed. No problems yet in 3 years with two large dogs. I don't send pictures or anything, just describe dogs and ages.
    Also mine are allowed on furniture, so I take several massive blankets to cover things but most places leave a pile of old curtains / sheets / towels for our use.
    If you want a really nice dog friendly cottage in Scotland pm me
    63 mortgage payments to go.

    Zero wins 2016 !!!128549;
    • Red-Squirrel
    • By Red-Squirrel 17th May 18, 8:28 PM
    • 2,665 Posts
    • 7,141 Thanks
    Red-Squirrel
    Luck had nothing to do with it.
    Originally posted by chucknorris
    Of course it did, it always does to some extent.
    • chucknorris
    • By chucknorris 17th May 18, 8:41 PM
    • 9,548 Posts
    • 14,336 Thanks
    chucknorris
    Of course it did, it always does to some extent.
    Originally posted by Red-Squirrel
    Yes exactly, only 'to some extent' (and very minor at that), but my success in becoming very wealthy was substantially down to working very hard, intelligence and a good judgement and attitude towards taking on risk (I don't take risk on any more, I probably have more than I can spend, so there is no upside in taking on risk).
    Last edited by chucknorris; 17-05-2018 at 8:45 PM.
    Chuck Norris can kill two stones with one bird
    The only time Chuck Norris was wrong was when he thought he had made a mistake
    Chuck Norris puts the "laughter" in "manslaughter".
    After running injuries I now mostly hike, gym classes and weight training (also a bit of cycling and swimming), less impact on my joints.
    • chucknorris
    • By chucknorris 17th May 18, 8:49 PM
    • 9,548 Posts
    • 14,336 Thanks
    chucknorris
    I rent holiday cottages In the UK for my holidays. I used various sites that I can filter for pets allowed. No problems yet in 3 years with two large dogs. I don't send pictures or anything, just describe dogs and ages.
    Also mine are allowed on furniture, so I take several massive blankets to cover things but most places leave a pile of old curtains / sheets / towels for our use.
    If you want a really nice dog friendly cottage in Scotland pm me
    Originally posted by missprice
    We don't have many problems in the UK, but we do like to go to Spain for 4-5 weeks during the winter between semesters (I'm a university lecturer). We find that the choice there isn't great with a dog, I did consider buying a holiday home there, but I don't fancy the hassle of long distance ownership.
    Chuck Norris can kill two stones with one bird
    The only time Chuck Norris was wrong was when he thought he had made a mistake
    Chuck Norris puts the "laughter" in "manslaughter".
    After running injuries I now mostly hike, gym classes and weight training (also a bit of cycling and swimming), less impact on my joints.
    • Red-Squirrel
    • By Red-Squirrel 17th May 18, 8:51 PM
    • 2,665 Posts
    • 7,141 Thanks
    Red-Squirrel
    Yes exactly, only 'to some extent' (and very minor at that), but my success in becoming very wealthy was substantially down to working very hard, intelligence and a good judgement and attitude towards taking on risk (I don't take risk on any more, I probably have more than I can spend, so there is no upside in taking on risk).
    Originally posted by chucknorris
    Right, of course.
    • chucknorris
    • By chucknorris 17th May 18, 8:55 PM
    • 9,548 Posts
    • 14,336 Thanks
    chucknorris
    Right, of course.
    Originally posted by Red-Squirrel
    Watch out for that chip on your shoulder, its making you look a bit lob-sided.
    Chuck Norris can kill two stones with one bird
    The only time Chuck Norris was wrong was when he thought he had made a mistake
    Chuck Norris puts the "laughter" in "manslaughter".
    After running injuries I now mostly hike, gym classes and weight training (also a bit of cycling and swimming), less impact on my joints.
    • Red-Squirrel
    • By Red-Squirrel 17th May 18, 10:37 PM
    • 2,665 Posts
    • 7,141 Thanks
    Red-Squirrel
    Watch out for that chip on your shoulder, its making you look a bit lob-sided.
    Originally posted by chucknorris
    Not at all, I've been very lucky too. I think its important to realise that rather than getting too self congratulatory and falling into the trap of thinking I deserve more/better than others who have had worse luck.
    • chucknorris
    • By chucknorris 18th May 18, 6:29 AM
    • 9,548 Posts
    • 14,336 Thanks
    chucknorris
    Not at all, I've been very lucky too. I think its important to realise that rather than getting too self congratulatory and falling into the trap of thinking I deserve more/better than others who have had worse luck.
    Originally posted by Red-Squirrel
    OK so lets look at the facts, and try and see where the luck occurred. When I was 24, I had a serious road traffic accident that took me 4 years to recover from.

    During that 4 years I looked at myself and my lack of achievement in life, and I decided to try and do something about it. I was 27 years old (so still 1 year from recovery), I had not been regularly employed for about 7 years, and I had virtually no qualifications, and was left with two disabilities from the accident. I could no longer rotate my left wrist, no supination, and reduced pronation (my radius and ulna had both shattered and had fused together). Also my femur (thigh bone) had shattered too, and this left me with virtually no right knee bend, and other complications. I was informed that it was unlikely that I could work as an electrician again, due to my disabilities, although I doubted that, I was never happy doing that anyway, and I decided to re-invent myself. The first thing that I had to do was get an education, at the same time my disabilities (from the accident) were being assessed via the job centre, they came up with 'assistant QS' (quantity surveyor) and I enrolled on an assistant quantity surveyors course, where I eventually sat a city and guilds exam. I had worked really hard on that course, and was rewarded for my efforts by obtaining the highest marks in the exam in the British Commonwealth, and I won the silver medal (there was no gold medal). By this time I realised that I wanted to become a chartered quantity surveyor (not merely an assistant quantity surveyor). So I applied to various polytechnics to read for a QS degree as a mature student at 28. I went to Leeds Poly, quite intimidated, being amongst all those much more intelligent students (but that was just my in my mind), I thought that if I worked really hard I might somehow scrape through and end up with a degree. But I actually ended up being the top student, and I got a first class honours degree, not because I was a genius, but again because I worked so hard. When I graduated at 32, they asked me to stay on and teach there, but I was quite looking forward to working in industry, but again, a bit scared because of my age (being much older than all the other graduates). So as well as working very hard in my career I also started off two businesses that I built up in my spare time (but I had no spare time, I worked late every night, every weekend, and all my holidays. 10 years later, I nearly had a break down, and I realised that I had to stop working so hard, so at 42, I retired from quantity surveying, but by then I was a multi-millionaire, and my two businesses were providing more income than my career. 10 years later, at 52 I sold one of the businesses, I found I had a lot more time, and I started another career as a university lecturer, which I really enjoy. I gave them my notice to retire a couple of years ago, but they asked me to consider staying on, and work one day per week, which I did, and I think I'll do that for the foreseeable future.

    So where was the luck:

    - Having the serious road traffic accident, that took 4 years of my life to recover from, but which triggered me to re-evaluate my life and turn it around? I don't think many would call that luck.

    - Working really hard and getting the highest marks in the City & Guilds exam (which enabled me to go to a polytechnic)? Not really, that was down to hard work (and also some ability).

    - Ditto getting my first class honours degree.

    - Ditto becoming a successful chartered quantity surveyor.

    - Ditto for putting in the effort (on top of my career) to build up two businesses.

    So why don't you tell me, where was the luck? I really think that it was down to hard work. I would accept that I was very lucky that I didn't die or was even more seriously hurt in the accident, considering the car that I was in, somersaulted over the crash barrier of the M1, and ended up upside down on the embankment on the other side of the M1. But that luck didn't really give me what I have now, I achieved what I did, in spite of that.

    EDIT: I am 60 now, and I if I had my time over again, I would have followed the same path, but I would not have worked so hard. I realise that I sacrificed my personal life too much and worked too hard. But I was financially insecure, and I didn't really believe in my ability for a very long time (in spite of some success), and thought that I had to work harder than everyone else to get somewhere in life. I was financially insecure mainly down to coming from a poor background, and I was determined to become wealthy (or die trying). But I am not unhappy about my choices, I am happy and grateful for what I have now, but I do not think that it was down to luck. But I do wish that I had been more confident and believed in myself more when I was younger.
    Last edited by chucknorris; 18-05-2018 at 6:54 AM.
    Chuck Norris can kill two stones with one bird
    The only time Chuck Norris was wrong was when he thought he had made a mistake
    Chuck Norris puts the "laughter" in "manslaughter".
    After running injuries I now mostly hike, gym classes and weight training (also a bit of cycling and swimming), less impact on my joints.
    • dunroving
    • By dunroving 18th May 18, 9:14 AM
    • 1,163 Posts
    • 812 Thanks
    dunroving
    OK so lets look at the facts, and try and see where the luck occurred. When I was 24, I had a serious road traffic accident that took me 4 years to recover from.

    During that 4 years I looked at myself and my lack of achievement in life, and I decided to try and do something about it. I was 27 years old (so still 1 year from recovery), I had not been regularly employed for about 7 years, and I had virtually no qualifications, and was left with two disabilities from the accident. I could no longer rotate my left wrist, no supination, and reduced pronation (my radius and ulna had both shattered and had fused together). Also my femur (thigh bone) had shattered too, and this left me with virtually no right knee bend, and other complications. I was informed that it was unlikely that I could work as an electrician again, due to my disabilities, although I doubted that, I was never happy doing that anyway, and I decided to re-invent myself. The first thing that I had to do was get an education, at the same time my disabilities (from the accident) were being assessed via the job centre, they came up with 'assistant QS' (quantity surveyor) and I enrolled on an assistant quantity surveyors course, where I eventually sat a city and guilds exam. I had worked really hard on that course, and was rewarded for my efforts by obtaining the highest marks in the exam in the British Commonwealth, and I won the silver medal (there was no gold medal). By this time I realised that I wanted to become a chartered quantity surveyor (not merely an assistant quantity surveyor). So I applied to various polytechnics to read for a QS degree as a mature student at 28. I went to Leeds Poly, quite intimidated, being amongst all those much more intelligent students (but that was just my in my mind), I thought that if I worked really hard I might somehow scrape through and end up with a degree. But I actually ended up being the top student, and I got a first class honours degree, not because I was a genius, but again because I worked so hard. When I graduated at 32, they asked me to stay on and teach there, but I was quite looking forward to working in industry, but again, a bit scared because of my age (being much older than all the other graduates). So as well as working very hard in my career I also started off two businesses that I built up in my spare time (but I had no spare time, I worked late every night, every weekend, and all my holidays. 10 years later, I nearly had a break down, and I realised that I had to stop working so hard, so at 42, I retired from quantity surveying, but by then I was a multi-millionaire, and my two businesses were providing more income than my career. 10 years later, at 52 I sold one of the businesses, I found I had a lot more time, and I started another career as a university lecturer, which I really enjoy. I gave them my notice to retire a couple of years ago, but they asked me to consider staying on, and work one day per week, which I did, and I think I'll do that for the foreseeable future.

    So where was the luck:

    - Having the serious road traffic accident, that took 4 years of my life to recover from, but which triggered me to re-evaluate my life and turn it around? I don't think many would call that luck.

    - Working really hard and getting the highest marks in the City & Guilds exam (which enabled me to go to a polytechnic)? Not really, that was down to hard work (and also some ability).

    - Ditto getting my first class honours degree.

    - Ditto becoming a successful chartered quantity surveyor.

    - Ditto for putting in the effort (on top of my career) to build up two businesses.

    So why don't you tell me, where was the luck? I really think that it was down to hard work. I would accept that I was very lucky that I didn't die or was even more seriously hurt in the accident, considering the car that I was in, somersaulted over the crash barrier of the M1, and ended up upside down on the embankment on the other side of the M1. But that luck didn't really give me what I have now, I achieved what I did, in spite of that.

    EDIT: I am 60 now, and I if I had my time over again, I would have followed the same path, but I would not have worked so hard. I realise that I sacrificed my personal life too much and worked too hard. But I was financially insecure, and I didn't really believe in my ability for a very long time (in spite of some success), and thought that I had to work harder than everyone else to get somewhere in life. I was financially insecure mainly down to coming from a poor background, and I was determined to become wealthy (or die trying). But I am not unhappy about my choices, I am happy and grateful for what I have now, but I do not think that it was down to luck. But I do wish that I had been more confident and believed in myself more when I was younger.
    Originally posted by chucknorris
    You were lucky not to get killed.

    [That's only tongue in cheek, because I know someone will say it somewhere down the line]

    [and I think I have a right to say it, being a member of the same club]

    Everyone has some luck some how, but it doesn't mean you had it easy, right?
    (Nearly) dunroving
    • quantumlobster
    • By quantumlobster 18th May 18, 9:33 AM
    • 75 Posts
    • 133 Thanks
    quantumlobster
    All the dogs i know smell. None of the owners think they smell. Hence extra deposits etc; cleaning may cost more.
    Originally posted by BrassicWoman
    Interestingly, all houses smell, including yours. They may smell of dog, or cat, or cooking, or smoking, or BO, or air freshener and cleaning products, or fresh flowers, or whatever hobby the owner has.

    I have two dogs (neither of whom are labrador-esque in the magnitude of their smell, but they do smell of dog, esp. when wet ) but what I notice when I go to houses that have no dogs (or have cats) is that they smell different, not that they smell better or worse, or not at all.

    TBH, I can't think of a quadruped pet that holds a candle to caged birds for pong-osity.
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