Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@.

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • ruthieb77
    • By ruthieb77 14th May 18, 9:50 PM
    • 34Posts
    • 14Thanks
    ruthieb77
    Declaring nuisance neighbours if we sell
    • #1
    • 14th May 18, 9:50 PM
    Declaring nuisance neighbours if we sell 14th May 18 at 9:50 PM
    We have nuisance neighbours. They have 2 yappy dogs that frequently wake us up - both early in the morning and late at night. Their son is the drummer in a band and they often have band practice in the house. They also like to play loud music with all of the doors and windows open. We have spoken to them several times about the noise and asked them to be more considerate but they've ignored us.

    I've decided I can't stand it any more so want to move. This could obviously take some time though so I'm considering reporting them to the council in the meantime. If I do complain, would we need to declare it when we sell? I've heard mixed reviews about the current rules.

    Thanks.
Page 2
    • cjdavies
    • By cjdavies 15th May 18, 2:29 PM
    • 3,406 Posts
    • 3,640 Thanks
    cjdavies
    Noisy Neighbours is a tricky one for me, I'm not noise senistive, a mate was here before and said can you hear the child crying next door? I couldn't - I had to put my ear against the wall!
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 15th May 18, 4:02 PM
    • 16,186 Posts
    • 44,582 Thanks
    moneyistooshorttomention
    Noisy Neighbours is a tricky one for me, I'm not noise senistive, a mate was here before and said can you hear the child crying next door? I couldn't - I had to put my ear against the wall!
    Originally posted by cjdavies
    From a recent (totally unrelated) discussion on here - I'd hazard a guess that perceptions of noise might boil down (to some extent) to how large a family one comes from.

    Standard size family (ie 1 or 2 children) and that probably equals standard perception of noise. Large family and that probably equals one grew up "tuning it out" to a large extent.

    I would tend to agree with that - having come from a standard size family myself (ie 2 children) and my parents did Move 3 on the housing ladder (ie to a detached house) when I was early teenage. Therefore - I hate noise - as it's not "the norm" to me.
    ****************
    • hazyjo
    • By hazyjo 15th May 18, 4:27 PM
    • 10,711 Posts
    • 14,065 Thanks
    hazyjo
    I only have one sister and am so noise intolerant it's ridiculous. I can't bear noise. I just had to walk to the loo as the person I sit with was filing her nails. Arghhh! And I hate any sort of tapping - especially keyboards! I sit in the quiet zone on the way home on my train. Seriously, I cannot bear noise (maybe partly due to having had vertigo a couple of times).


    BUT we have a trumpet player and a singer next door. I rarely hear or notice it and I'm more proud of the fact that they're there and have played with several bands/musicians I've heard of. Really, barely any noise at all. I have very occasionally heard them when in the bathroom, but we're halls adjoining with very thick/well insulated walls so we just don't get noise. It's just very distant/faint and not unpleasant!


    I suppose what's hell for one isn't for another. I certainly won't be declaring it if we move! We hear more from a car starting in the street, or the planes overhead.
    2018 wins: Single Malt Whisky; theatre tickets; festival tickets; year of gin(!); shoes
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 15th May 18, 4:59 PM
    • 16,186 Posts
    • 44,582 Thanks
    moneyistooshorttomention
    There is a subjective element of what noise one personally objects to.

    I know I'm fine with train noise (as long as it's not High Speed Train - which is a modern addition to the scene) - as normal trains are just = public transport & that's fine then.

    But I would loathe high speed trains and I do loathe cars and planes (ie private transport and luxury transport).
    ****************
    • maisie cat
    • By maisie cat 15th May 18, 4:59 PM
    • 464 Posts
    • 550 Thanks
    maisie cat
    how can anyone know whether something is likely to cause a dispute? What a stupid way of wording a question. Far too subjective
    Originally posted by lookstraightahead
    I've often thought that, does it not depend on what bothers individuals. I live in a densely populated area of Surrey between Gatwick & Heathrow, we sometimes get planes over depending on the wind direction.
    We have neighbours with dogs that are not a nuisance and everybody within spitting distance has a barbeque that is also not a nuisance. All the neighbours have lawnmowers and a couple have strimmers. Several have small children and one has chickens. We all sometimes do DIY and next door has a set of drums that are allowed to be played for 20 minutes at a time on pain of death (from Mum). None of that has ever caused a dispute or likely to because we all make some noise at some point.
    How am I supposed to know that something that doesn't bother us is not going to be a bother to others? Do I have to put all that information just in case somebody doesn't realise that a densely populated are will have noise?
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 15th May 18, 5:07 PM
    • 16,186 Posts
    • 44,582 Thanks
    moneyistooshorttomention
    I'd err on the side of caution - ie mention everything...

    Dog noise isnt normal. Dogs arent kept outside. Dogs arent allowed to bark.

    But - there are areas of the country where the norm is different to my own norm and dogs are kept outside and are allowed to bark. Therefore someone living here mightnt even think of it - but if one has come from an area where the norm is very different and one doesnt hear dogs barking = yep....it needs to be mentioned.
    ****************
    • hazyjo
    • By hazyjo 15th May 18, 5:39 PM
    • 10,711 Posts
    • 14,065 Thanks
    hazyjo
    I would never mention a barking dog unless it was barking night and day and/or they never took it in. Of course it's normal for dogs to bark! Just not all the time... Lots of dogs will bark if there's say a knock at the door or if they see a cat or something.
    2018 wins: Single Malt Whisky; theatre tickets; festival tickets; year of gin(!); shoes
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 15th May 18, 7:32 PM
    • 25,587 Posts
    • 93,607 Thanks
    Davesnave
    I'd err on the side of caution - ie mention everything...
    Originally posted by moneyistooshorttomention
    Now there's a thought.....

    One could confuse the buyer with a veritable barrage of things that might have the potential to cause a dispute, thus hiding the real problem amongst all the guff. The Chameleon Strategy. I like it!
    If you are finding huge gaps between your paragraphs, MSE know about the problem. However, they aren't necessarily doing anything about it. More changes on the way?
    https://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.php?t=5844460
    • Slinky
    • By Slinky 15th May 18, 7:45 PM
    • 5,298 Posts
    • 24,675 Thanks
    Slinky
    I'd err on the side of caution - ie mention everything...

    Dog noise isnt normal. Dogs arent kept outside. Dogs arent allowed to bark.

    But - there are areas of the country where the norm is different to my own norm and dogs are kept outside and are allowed to bark. Therefore someone living here mightnt even think of it - but if one has come from an area where the norm is very different and one doesnt hear dogs barking = yep....it needs to be mentioned.
    Originally posted by moneyistooshorttomention


    Oh good grief this is ridiculous. A couple of doors along they have dogs. They show them in obedience classes. They're very well behaved. Very occasionally they may be playing in the back garden and you get a few seconds of growling and a couple of barks then that's it. I feel no need to declare this on a form when we sell. Should I be declaring the sounds of young children playing in a garden in the next street we can occasionally hear?
    • maladict
    • By maladict 16th May 18, 12:56 AM
    • 1 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    maladict
    BUT we have a trumpet player and a singer next door. I rarely hear or notice it and I'm more proud of the fact that they're there and have played with several bands/musicians I've heard of. Really, barely any noise at all. I have very occasionally heard them when in the bathroom, but we're halls adjoining with very thick/well insulated walls so we just don't get noise. It's just very distant/faint and not unpleasant!
    Originally posted by hazyjo
    When I lived in a bedsit, the guy who had the drawing room bedsit next door was a professional pianist who'd taken the big room so he had space for his piano. I'd often be at home studying while he practised and would hear piano music drifting through to me as I worked. It was an absolute joy

    Sorry, random post to delurk for, but I still remember that with so much pleasure. It's sad to think that to someone else it might just be 'noise nuisance'.

    /relurks
    • humptydumptybits
    • By humptydumptybits 16th May 18, 12:38 PM
    • 885 Posts
    • 1,569 Thanks
    humptydumptybits
    At the bottom of the hill where I live there are a couple of houses with teenagers who are learning drums. They play in their garages and I'd hate to be their neighbours. Whenever I walk past in the evening I thank heavens I live far enough away not to hear.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 16th May 18, 2:03 PM
    • 25,587 Posts
    • 93,607 Thanks
    Davesnave
    Back in the 70s, I was vocalist for a rather unsuccessful band, all of whom were reasonably accomplished musicians. They regarded the need for regular rehearsals with disdain, but as a non-musician I felt the need to run through the repertoire once a week.

    Knowing I was probably the weakest link, the others made backing tracks for me, which I'd put through the PA in my bedroom and sing along. Sometimes I'd use headphones and sometimes not.

    We were quite friendly with our neighbours at our student house, so when the lady banged on the wall at around 10pm, I went round and apologised profusely for my late rehearsal. She said she and her husband didn't mind, so long as I always finished by 10pm.

    As an afterthought I asked, "Would you prefer me to use the speakers or sing with headphones on?"

    I don't know if she really understood, but reply came back, "Do whichever you want dear; it all sounds bloody awful to us!"
    If you are finding huge gaps between your paragraphs, MSE know about the problem. However, they aren't necessarily doing anything about it. More changes on the way?
    https://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.php?t=5844460
    • humptydumptybits
    • By humptydumptybits 16th May 18, 5:08 PM
    • 885 Posts
    • 1,569 Thanks
    humptydumptybits
    Back in the 70s, I was vocalist for a rather unsuccessful band, all of whom were reasonably accomplished musicians. They regarded the need for regular rehearsals with disdain, but as a non-musician I felt the need to run through the repertoire once a week.

    Knowing I was probably the weakest link, the others made backing tracks for me, which I'd put through the PA in my bedroom and sing along. Sometimes I'd use headphones and sometimes not.

    We were quite friendly with our neighbours at our student house, so when the lady banged on the wall at around 10pm, I went round and apologised profusely for my late rehearsal. She said she and her husband didn't mind, so long as I always finished by 10pm.

    As an afterthought I asked, "Would you prefer me to use the speakers or sing with headphones on?"

    I don't know if she really understood, but reply came back, "Do whichever you want dear; it all sounds bloody awful to us!"
    Originally posted by Davesnave
    I love old lady put downs. I'm not brave enough yet but the day will come.............
    • PhilE
    • By PhilE 16th May 18, 7:03 PM
    • 341 Posts
    • 216 Thanks
    PhilE
    I think, when your buyer's solicitor sends you a load of legal questions relating to the house, one of them specifically asks about whether you've ever had problems with neighbours. You are required to answer it (and to answer it truthfully).
    Originally posted by Zanderman
    There not going to go on a lie detector test. Also, who's to say the barking didn't start until the buyer moved it? Its difficult to prove that there was a noise issue that a vendor should have declared, which is why its necessary to check an area very carefully before buying.

    If there's a complaint to the council, or a formal signed letter to the neighbors then that would have to be declard. A word over the fence or polite, unsigned note does not.

    If we were a country like Germany, the police would shut the neighbors up very quickly, as people have to get up and work in the morning in order to contribute to the best economy in Europe.
    Unfortunately we do not have such common sense in this country, neither do we have the best economy which is not a coincidence.

    OP, you certainly could complain to the council and with enough evidence they may act. You'd have to declare it and maybe knock something off the price, when it came to selling.

    I'd first try keeping quiet and getting out of there.
    Last edited by PhilE; 16-05-2018 at 7:07 PM.
    • shortcrust
    • By shortcrust 16th May 18, 7:21 PM
    • 2,029 Posts
    • 3,022 Thanks
    shortcrust
    At the bottom of the hill where I live there are a couple of houses with teenagers who are learning drums. They play in their garages and I'd hate to be their neighbours. Whenever I walk past in the evening I thank heavens I live far enough away not to hear.
    Originally posted by humptydumptybits
    I'd end up in a police cell if I were their neighbour.
    • jonnygee2
    • By jonnygee2 16th May 18, 7:53 PM
    • 96 Posts
    • 60 Thanks
    jonnygee2
    In this case I think legally speaking you should declare it - as it's clearly something which could affect a buyers decision and therefore the value of the property. The form normally asks if there's anything which might cause a dispute.

    You are free not to, of course. There are risks though - you've spoken to the neighbours before and it sounds like a serious ongoing problem - it might be difficult to hide the fact you knew about it. You could, quite legitimately, be sued.

    Your best bet is actually to try and resolve it. If you go to the council, and the neighbours shut up, then you don't need to declare it as the forms normally ask about current / ongoing or potential disputes.
    • humptydumptybits
    • By humptydumptybits 16th May 18, 9:04 PM
    • 885 Posts
    • 1,569 Thanks
    humptydumptybits
    I'd end up in a police cell if I were their neighbour.
    Originally posted by shortcrust
    I wonder if these boys are in competition with each other, they both leave the garage doors open so the neighbours get the full benefit.
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

1,524Posts Today

6,986Users online

Martin's Twitter