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  • FIRST POST
    • VfM4meplse
    • By VfM4meplse 14th May 18, 9:27 AM
    • 26,090Posts
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    VfM4meplse
    Loft insulation and flooring costs
    • #1
    • 14th May 18, 9:27 AM
    Loft insulation and flooring costs 14th May 18 at 9:27 AM
    Apologies if this is a lazy post. One of my priorities this year is to have my loft insulated to proper levels so the winter is less of a hardship. From the foorplan, I estimate its about 27m sq. I am guessing it shouldn't take more than a day for an experienced builder, but what would be a reasonable cost?

    I'm in two minds about boarding the loft; on the one hand it would make crawling around it a lot easier (no loft ladder yet!) and makes sense to have it done at the same time, on the other hand I'm reluctant to use it as storage space purely because it will be a means of storing stuff that I won't actually look at again for the next 20 years. I'm uncertain whether a loft room will ever be an option should I need an extra habitable space, because the pitch of the roof is so low.

    Pros and cons? And reasonable cost?
    Value-for-money-for-me-puhleeze!

    "No man is worth, crawling on the earth"- adapted from Bob Crewe and Bob Gaudio

    Hope is not a strategy ...A child is for life, not just 18 years....Don't get me started on the NHS, because you won't win...If in doubt, don't pull out... I love chaz-ing!
Page 1
    • ashe
    • By ashe 14th May 18, 10:00 AM
    • 548 Posts
    • 408 Thanks
    ashe
    • #2
    • 14th May 18, 10:00 AM
    • #2
    • 14th May 18, 10:00 AM
    You can get lofts boarded out for a few hundred quid usually, will be loads of local companies that wiooo give you a quote.

    You can also just get it part boarded to help resist the temptation of putting half your life up there!
    • Furts
    • By Furts 14th May 18, 10:29 AM
    • 4,450 Posts
    • 2,884 Thanks
    Furts
    • #3
    • 14th May 18, 10:29 AM
    • #3
    • 14th May 18, 10:29 AM
    Better value would be obtained by getting insulation and boarding done together - you pay for one job in effect. Also the job can be done right first time. No point in getting fibreglass put down next month then next year saying rip it and insulate and board the loft.

    Roughly 300 mm fibreglass/Rockwool is the minimum but this will only increase in requirements over time. Which means if you want to future proof then do some thinking.

    Ponder the concepts of roof ventilation and membranes before you do anything. An upgraded roof insulation will make your roof colder so could cause significant condensation problems. So review your underlay type, review the ventilation and review putting in a membrane.
    • VfM4meplse
    • By VfM4meplse 14th May 18, 11:05 AM
    • 26,090 Posts
    • 55,621 Thanks
    VfM4meplse
    • #4
    • 14th May 18, 11:05 AM
    • #4
    • 14th May 18, 11:05 AM
    Ponder the concepts of roof ventilation and membranes before you do anything. An upgraded roof insulation will make your roof colder so could cause significant condensation problems. So review your underlay type, review the ventilation and review putting in a membrane.
    Originally posted by Furts
    Its at the point that something that should be relatively simple becomes complicated that I zone out (same has happened with my front door, draughtly in the winter time and sticking in the summer and as yet unchanged!).

    I don't want a damp loft space but I do want a warm home. What do you suggest?
    Value-for-money-for-me-puhleeze!

    "No man is worth, crawling on the earth"- adapted from Bob Crewe and Bob Gaudio

    Hope is not a strategy ...A child is for life, not just 18 years....Don't get me started on the NHS, because you won't win...If in doubt, don't pull out... I love chaz-ing!
    • sevenhills
    • By sevenhills 14th May 18, 11:34 AM
    • 1,529 Posts
    • 567 Thanks
    sevenhills
    • #5
    • 14th May 18, 11:34 AM
    • #5
    • 14th May 18, 11:34 AM
    I don't want a damp loft space but I do want a warm home. What do you suggest?
    Originally posted by VfM4meplse
    Surely a new front door would save you the most on heating. But if you are a hoarder and want your loft boarding out, go for it.
    A drop down staircase would be a must?
    Loft Boarding Cost for Post 1975 Homes
    • 10m2 – £907.90
    • 20m2 – £1,407.80
    • 30m2 – £1,907.70
    • 40m2 – £2,407.60
    • 50m2 – £2,907,50
    • 60m2 – £3,407.40
    • 70m2 – £3,907.30
    • 80m2 – £4,407.20
    *All prices include your chosen area of our Raised Loft Floor System, a new enlarged loft opening fitted with a UPVC hinged down loft hatch, a branded 3 section aluminium loft ladder, a single light and switch, and a 10 year guarantee.


    https://www.instaloft.co.uk/how-much-loft-boarding-cost/

    • Furts
    • By Furts 14th May 18, 11:39 AM
    • 4,450 Posts
    • 2,884 Thanks
    Furts
    • #6
    • 14th May 18, 11:39 AM
    • #6
    • 14th May 18, 11:39 AM
    Its at the point that something that should be relatively simple becomes complicated that I zone out (same has happened with my front door, draughtly in the winter time and sticking in the summer and as yet unchanged!).

    I don't want a damp loft space but I do want a warm home. What do you suggest?
    Originally posted by VfM4meplse
    There is no simple few words answer here. Like everything with a house building has evolved, it is technical, it is based on design and Regulations, and that is why one has to seek competent trades. So your response should be questions to put to whoever you are thinking of engaging.

    That does not mean I am copping out here but I have not seen your home. So I cannot give you a specific answer. To give my home as an example I upgraded when doing other building works. My inadequate fibreglass came out, a polythene membrane went in, on top of that Celotex - 2 layers sealed together and gaps sealed, an air gap, then 22mm P5 chipboard. I already had 10mm air venting in the soffit (Buildings Regulations) but no ridge venting. So I had 225x225 air bricks built into the gables.

    I accept all this may cause a fogging over, but it does all matter. If these things are not considered ( here are other ways) then the end result may cause problems. So bounce all this around with whoever is going to do the job. See what you want, see if things are going to be OK.
    • Norman Castle
    • By Norman Castle 14th May 18, 11:39 AM
    • 7,413 Posts
    • 6,176 Thanks
    Norman Castle
    • #7
    • 14th May 18, 11:39 AM
    • #7
    • 14th May 18, 11:39 AM

    I'm in two minds about boarding the loft; on the one hand it would make crawling around it a lot easier (no loft ladder yet!) and makes sense to have it done at the same time, on the other hand I'm reluctant to use it as storage space purely because it will be a means of storing stuff that I won't actually look at again for the next 20 years.
    Originally posted by VfM4meplse

    Do you need extra storage space? Lofts are great for larger items such as suitcases and Christmas decorations which are a pain if you have limited storage. With a decent ladder and proper light they can be easy to use regularly. My loft hatch is in the kitchen and has a drop down ladder. I regularly get ebay packaging out of the loft while cooking and watching the news.
    Unlikely to need a builder for this. There are companies which fit loft hatches and are likely to also board lofts. They should be able to advise what is possible and costs.


    Damp and condensation is avoided by having decent ventilation.


    These look good. Anyone tried them?
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Vents-Prevents-Condensation-Attic-Ventilation/dp/B00M97O5YY

    One review suggests, " I think it is better to buy foam pipe lagging for 15mm pipes, cut it in half length ways and push it in between the felt." which fits my budget.
    Last edited by Norman Castle; 14-05-2018 at 11:55 AM.
    Don't harass a hippie. You'll get bad karma.

    Never trust a newbie with a rtb tale.
    • VfM4meplse
    • By VfM4meplse 14th May 18, 2:13 PM
    • 26,090 Posts
    • 55,621 Thanks
    VfM4meplse
    • #8
    • 14th May 18, 2:13 PM
    • #8
    • 14th May 18, 2:13 PM
    Surely a new front door would save you the most on heating.
    Originally posted by sevenhills
    Its not the cost that's putting me off, its all the horror stories I have seen on here that led me from being entirely ignorant to being scared of horror stories to plunging my head deeply in the sand. My worst nightmare is having the security of my front door compromised when I absolutely need to leave for work because I end up with something unfit for purpose after a few months use.
    Value-for-money-for-me-puhleeze!

    "No man is worth, crawling on the earth"- adapted from Bob Crewe and Bob Gaudio

    Hope is not a strategy ...A child is for life, not just 18 years....Don't get me started on the NHS, because you won't win...If in doubt, don't pull out... I love chaz-ing!
    • d0nkeyk0ng
    • By d0nkeyk0ng 14th May 18, 2:31 PM
    • 611 Posts
    • 223 Thanks
    d0nkeyk0ng
    • #9
    • 14th May 18, 2:31 PM
    • #9
    • 14th May 18, 2:31 PM
    We got a loft company to install the hatch. Cost £375.
    I bought a raised floor kit for the loft (5m x 5m). Cost £350.
    Spent around £100 on insulation (base layer and top up).
    Spent around £60 on loft boards. Extra for screws.
    I installed the kit, the insulation and boards over a few weekends.


    The only bits left to do is neaten the floor space around the hatch and add some sort of grab rail.
    • sevenhills
    • By sevenhills 14th May 18, 8:01 PM
    • 1,529 Posts
    • 567 Thanks
    sevenhills
    I hope to get my loft joists strengthened and boarded out; with a will to do further work myself.
    Money is an issue, I dont want to waste it. Because it could be another room which hardly gets used, or it could be a valuable asset.
    Moving the boiler and installing a staircase maybe £1,000 each; might never happen, lol

    • Furts
    • By Furts 15th May 18, 7:30 AM
    • 4,450 Posts
    • 2,884 Thanks
    Furts
    Surely a new front door would save you the most on heating. But if you are a hoarder and want your loft boarding out, go for it.
    A drop down staircase would be a must?
    Loft Boarding Cost for Post 1975 Homes
    • 10m2 – £907.90
    • 20m2 – £1,407.80
    • 30m2 – £1,907.70
    • 40m2 – £2,407.60
    • 50m2 – £2,907,50
    • 60m2 – £3,407.40
    • 70m2 – £3,907.30
    • 80m2 – £4,407.20
    *All prices include your chosen area of our Raised Loft Floor System, a new enlarged loft opening fitted with a UPVC hinged down loft hatch, a branded 3 section aluminium loft ladder, a single light and switch, and a 10 year guarantee.


    https://www.instaloft.co.uk/how-much-loft-boarding-cost/
    Originally posted by sevenhills
    Here one has to be so careful. It is easy to be sucked into websites offering fixed price dreams, but the reality is this company does not do things properly, does not care about Regulations, does not care about quality and then has the cheek to ram that message back to consumers by posting photos of this. Anyone with any sense of how to build looks at everything in the photos and either says stop, what happens next, or simply despairs. This is all about dumbing down standards and then selling this dodginess to unsuspecting consumers.

    I offered sound technical advice to OP, and gave the proviso that there are other ways. Every house is different. So I gave an example of my home. My home has been done properly and no way would I have lowered my standards to allow the bodging visible in these photos.
    • dunroving
    • By dunroving 15th May 18, 8:02 AM
    • 1,304 Posts
    • 904 Thanks
    dunroving
    I hope to get my loft joists strengthened and boarded out; with a will to do further work myself.
    Money is an issue, I dont want to waste it. Because it could be another room which hardly gets used, or it could be a valuable asset.
    Moving the boiler and installing a staircase maybe £1,000 each; might never happen, lol
    Originally posted by sevenhills
    Would you mind saying what professionals you hired to assess the job? Did you get it inspected by a structural engineer? Or "just" a builder?

    I'm asking because I want to board out at least part of the attic space in my new house but have read a couple of recent threads where the issue of joist strength has been raised.
    (Nearly) dunroving
    • Furts
    • By Furts 15th May 18, 8:28 AM
    • 4,450 Posts
    • 2,884 Thanks
    Furts
    Would you mind saying what professionals you hired to assess the job? Did you get it inspected by a structural engineer? Or "just" a builder?

    I'm asking because I want to board out at least part of the attic space in my new house but have read a couple of recent threads where the issue of joist strength has been raised.
    Originally posted by dunroving
    Structural Engineer is the only safe, guaranteed way forward, but the reality is almost no consumers would go down this route.

    A competent builder could sort matters. But here there is a problem. What is the definition of a builder? Here there is no answer. Anybody can be a builder, even if their career until yesterday was cutting grass for the local council. Then come onto competence. How would you as a consumer judge this? Which means the concept of a competent builder is not easy for the vast majority of consumers.

    Overloading roofs is a huge problem and a real problem. It is also getting worse. But this has to be coupled with the ventilation and insulation which most consumers do not focus on. Here you will note that your post mentions neither item. To give an example, I viewed a home that had remained unsold for six months because the roof was defective as a result of a diy loft boarding exercise. Even the Esatate Agent was warning people about this home - word had gone round!
    • dunroving
    • By dunroving 15th May 18, 10:34 AM
    • 1,304 Posts
    • 904 Thanks
    dunroving
    Structural Engineer is the only safe, guaranteed way forward, but the reality is almost no consumers would go down this route.

    A competent builder could sort matters. But here there is a problem. What is the definition of a builder? Here there is no answer. Anybody can be a builder, even if their career until yesterday was cutting grass for the local council. Then come onto competence. How would you as a consumer judge this? Which means the concept of a competent builder is not easy for the vast majority of consumers.

    Overloading roofs is a huge problem and a real problem. It is also getting worse. But this has to be coupled with the ventilation and insulation which most consumers do not focus on. Here you will note that your post mentions neither item. To give an example, I viewed a home that had remained unsold for six months because the roof was defective as a result of a diy loft boarding exercise. Even the Esatate Agent was warning people about this home - word had gone round!
    Originally posted by Furts
    Both ventilation and insulation are definitely on my radar (both were mentioned by the surveyor). Also, from the recent threads I did take away the importance of employing a structural engineer. As I plan to also build a garage-come-mancave-come-utility area, I figure getting a SE in for the roof space will allow me to try out the people who have been recommended on a smaller project first.

    I must admit that from seeing so many "lofts" (I call them attics) over the years that have been boarded, converted, etc., I had almost assumed that all attics were floor-able, so to speak. Reading threads on here, especially by people like yourself and Doozergirl, has been an education.
    (Nearly) dunroving
    • sevenhills
    • By sevenhills 15th May 18, 10:57 AM
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    • 567 Thanks
    sevenhills
    I must admit that from seeing so many "lofts" (I call them attics) over the years that have been boarded, converted, etc., I had almost assumed that all attics were floor-able, so to speak. Reading threads on here, especially by people like yourself and Doozergirl, has been an education.
    Originally posted by dunroving
    My sisters husband boarded out the loft in their bungalow, no issues. Its easy to search the different threads on here. But most houses will be different, so professional advice is always the best way to go.
    I understand metal joists that bolt together are what may be used; getting a piece of wood into the loft long enough to is impossible.

    I have a company van that parks just up the road from me, Yorkshire Loft Solutions, should make getting a quote easy.

    • Furts
    • By Furts 15th May 18, 1:37 PM
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    Furts
    My sisters husband boarded out the loft in their bungalow, no issues. Its easy to search the different threads on here. But most houses will be different, so professional advice is always the best way to go.
    I understand metal joists that bolt together are what may be used; getting a piece of wood into the loft long enough to is impossible.

    I have a company van that parks just up the road from me, Yorkshire Loft Solutions, should make getting a quote easy.
    Originally posted by sevenhills
    Yorkshire Loft Conversions proudly show their loft room for "ocassional use". This in itself sets alarm bells ringing. It is typical sales spin given out by dodgy companies as a way of misleading people, and a way of evading Regulations. Buyer Beware as ever here and there are many companies out there ever so eager to con consumers.

    I am not commenting on the photos - a cursory glance is enough to immediately flag up concerns, so enough said. But I will make one statement. Based on these observations there is no way I would recommend Yorkshire Loft Conversions to my worst enemy.
    • sevenhills
    • By sevenhills 15th May 18, 6:09 PM
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    • 567 Thanks
    sevenhills
    Buyer Beware as ever here and there are many companies out there ever so eager to con consumers.
    Originally posted by Furts
    Which is why people come on forums like this, so they can understand what they need. Can they make do with the cheap option, or perhaps its not viable at all.

    • Furts
    • By Furts 16th May 18, 8:12 AM
    • 4,450 Posts
    • 2,884 Thanks
    Furts
    Which is why people come on forums like this, so they can understand what they need. Can they make do with the cheap option, or perhaps its not viable at all.
    Originally posted by sevenhills
    Yes agreed, but there is an old saying "buy cheap, pay twice". Buying cheap does not mean a proper job. I am sure people such as Doozergirl write on this forum thinking consumers can gain knowledge from those with knowledge, and then make informed decisions. In effect offering education by way of a social conscience.
    • LandyAndy
    • By LandyAndy 16th May 18, 12:03 PM
    • 24,418 Posts
    • 51,560 Thanks
    LandyAndy
    There is no simple few words answer here.
    Originally posted by Furts
    And if there was, would you be the man to deliver it?
    • greyteam1959
    • By greyteam1959 16th May 18, 12:18 PM
    • 2,404 Posts
    • 1,111 Thanks
    greyteam1959
    And if there was, would you be the man to deliver it?
    Originally posted by LandyAndy
    Spot on.....................
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