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  • FIRST POST
    • Davina Hart
    • By Davina Hart 12th May 18, 10:48 PM
    • 31Posts
    • 6Thanks
    Davina Hart
    New built house | Steps to get to front door | Not told abou this
    • #1
    • 12th May 18, 10:48 PM
    New built house | Steps to get to front door | Not told abou this 12th May 18 at 10:48 PM
    Looking for a bit of advise to see if we can get some compensation from builder.

    We reserved a three bed house with the builder in March. We have exchanged last week, and recently we have been to the site to the see the progress and there we noticed the house was on a height which gave us the impression that there will be a few steps to get to the front door.

    We then went to sales office to find out. The sales person apologised for her error and said she forgot to mention this at the time of reservation. She said there will be three steps to the front of the house and two from rear garden entrance.

    Shall we take this further with the builder head office? We like the house but donít really want the steps and there is no way they can avoid the steps due to slight down slope on the road. Had we known about the steps we wouldnít have reserved the plot.

    No other plots have the steps but they are different house type. Our one has steps due to its corner position.

    What shall we do?

    Many thanks,
Page 1
    • Thrugelmir
    • By Thrugelmir 12th May 18, 10:54 PM
    • 59,815 Posts
    • 53,170 Thanks
    Thrugelmir
    • #2
    • 12th May 18, 10:54 PM
    • #2
    • 12th May 18, 10:54 PM
    You exchanged without visiting the site and viewing what you were buying? Albeit in an unfinished state. Puts you in a difficult position and at the mercy of the developer. Probably best to purchase the property and sell as soon as practically possible.
    Financial disasters happen when the last person who can remember what went wrong last time has left the building.
    • davidmcn
    • By davidmcn 12th May 18, 11:00 PM
    • 8,528 Posts
    • 8,988 Thanks
    davidmcn
    • #3
    • 12th May 18, 11:00 PM
    • #3
    • 12th May 18, 11:00 PM
    Do the approved drawings in the planning consent show the steps?
    • Davina Hart
    • By Davina Hart 12th May 18, 11:01 PM
    • 31 Posts
    • 6 Thanks
    Davina Hart
    • #4
    • 12th May 18, 11:01 PM
    • #4
    • 12th May 18, 11:01 PM
    We visited the site but house wasn!!!8217;t enen built at the time. We reserved and exchanged after seeing the site and property plan. The access (where our plot is) was restricted at the time which they recently open and hence we had a closer look recently. There is nothing more we could have done.
    • Davina Hart
    • By Davina Hart 12th May 18, 11:05 PM
    • 31 Posts
    • 6 Thanks
    Davina Hart
    • #5
    • 12th May 18, 11:05 PM
    • #5
    • 12th May 18, 11:05 PM
    !!!8220;Do the approved drawings in the planning consent show the steps?!!!8221;


    This is the bit they missed. We were shown how the house is going to look
    like, meter location, water, switches, lighting and stuff like that but nothing related to steps,
    • Owain Moneysaver
    • By Owain Moneysaver 12th May 18, 11:15 PM
    • 8,524 Posts
    • 9,660 Thanks
    Owain Moneysaver
    • #6
    • 12th May 18, 11:15 PM
    • #6
    • 12th May 18, 11:15 PM
    Do the plans for Building Control show the steps?

    AIUI Building Regulations now require a step-free entrance to the ground floor of a house.
    A kind word lasts a minute, a skelped erse is sair for a day.
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 13th May 18, 6:42 AM
    • 16,605 Posts
    • 45,823 Thanks
    moneyistooshorttomention
    • #7
    • 13th May 18, 6:42 AM
    • #7
    • 13th May 18, 6:42 AM
    Do the plans for Building Control show the steps?

    AIUI Building Regulations now require a step-free entrance to the ground floor of a house.
    Originally posted by Owain Moneysaver
    Ooh...I'd certainly check that to see what the possibilities were there.

    This could be taken in conjunction with possibly telling them to have one of those little mini-slopes instead of steps.
    ****************
    • comeandgo
    • By comeandgo 13th May 18, 7:25 AM
    • 2,177 Posts
    • 2,961 Thanks
    comeandgo
    • #8
    • 13th May 18, 7:25 AM
    • #8
    • 13th May 18, 7:25 AM
    It means to pass building control there will also be a ramp, ours is at the back door.
    • dunroving
    • By dunroving 13th May 18, 3:05 PM
    • 1,304 Posts
    • 904 Thanks
    dunroving
    • #9
    • 13th May 18, 3:05 PM
    • #9
    • 13th May 18, 3:05 PM
    Not sure I understand what is the big deal with three steps. Even houses on a level have a "step up" to the door, or even more. I just checked the house I am buying, on a level plot, and there are two steps to the front door. I couldn't be less bothered. But then I have 15 + 3 steps to get to my current house.

    But seriously, why do you care?
    (Nearly) dunroving
    • mije1983
    • By mije1983 13th May 18, 4:02 PM
    • 3,544 Posts
    • 20,271 Thanks
    mije1983
    Not sure I understand what is the big deal with three steps. Even houses on a level have a "step up" to the door, or even more. I just checked the house I am buying, on a level plot, and there are two steps to the front door. I couldn't be less bothered. But then I have 15 + 3 steps to get to my current house.

    But seriously, why do you care?
    Originally posted by dunroving



    It's possible the OP, or some other family member, uses a wheelchair. Or maybe due to illness finds it hard to manage steps. Therefore they deliberately chose a house with no steps?


    They are the only practical reasons I can see anyway.

    • Aylesbury Duck
    • By Aylesbury Duck 13th May 18, 4:05 PM
    • 2,315 Posts
    • 3,137 Thanks
    Aylesbury Duck
    Not sure I understand what is the big deal with three steps. Even houses on a level have a "step up" to the door, or even more. I just checked the house I am buying, on a level plot, and there are two steps to the front door. I couldn't be less bothered. But then I have 15 + 3 steps to get to my current house.

    But seriously, why do you care?
    Originally posted by dunroving
    I would care because I have a relative and a friend who both use wheelchairs. OP may have similar requirements now or be anticipating the need for a level entrance in future for some reason.
    Please forgive the deliberate omission of apostrophes on some posts whilst I await MSE to do something about the daft codes that appear in their place when typing on certain devices.
    • HampshireH
    • By HampshireH 13th May 18, 4:05 PM
    • 918 Posts
    • 1,019 Thanks
    HampshireH
    There could be a number of reasons why the OP cares.

    1st thought would be mobility concerns either the OP, family, visitors requiring no steps or at least just the 1 to get into a door.

    This is of course speculation but no more so than suggesting it shouldn't be a problem.
    • Davina Hart
    • By Davina Hart 13th May 18, 4:06 PM
    • 31 Posts
    • 6 Thanks
    Davina Hart
    Thanks all for your input. My mother stays with us and she has knee problems so thats the reason.
    • davidmcn
    • By davidmcn 13th May 18, 4:14 PM
    • 8,528 Posts
    • 8,988 Thanks
    davidmcn
    !!!8220;Do the approved drawings in the planning consent show the steps?!!!8221;

    This is the bit they missed. We were shown how the house is going to look
    like, meter location, water, switches, lighting and stuff like that but nothing related to steps,
    Originally posted by Davina Hart
    My question was really whether you have looked at the planning permission.

    Your contract (you have looked at that too, right?) almost certainly gives the builder leeway to build something only vaguely approximating to the promotional literature, though they ought to be building it in accordance with what the planners have approved.

    Unfortunately, if details like this are important to you then you really should be buying an already-completed house rather than something off-plan.
    • dunroving
    • By dunroving 13th May 18, 4:30 PM
    • 1,304 Posts
    • 904 Thanks
    dunroving
    If the issue is with access, can the steps not be converted to a ramp with a gentle incline? Or is there insufficient horizontal room to do this?

    I just looked through several houses on Rightmove that are ostensibly on a level plot and they all seem to have some sort of "step" into the house - surely few houses have a ground floor that is exactly level with the ground outside? Wouldn't that be a risk of flooding during heavy rain?

    It just seems that if this were so critical, there should have been some sort of conversation and confirmation in writing - I'd never assume a lack of any steps simply from visiting a plot of land.

    Either way, some sort of ramp seems the first obvious solution that comes to mind. I'm assuming your goal is to solve the problem regarding ease of access for your mother because of her knee problems, rather than to "get compensation", as you stated in your original post.
    Last edited by dunroving; 13-05-2018 at 5:15 PM.
    (Nearly) dunroving
    • A Nice Englishman
    • By A Nice Englishman 14th May 18, 12:18 AM
    • 2,117 Posts
    • 1,184 Thanks
    A Nice Englishman
    Will Mum be going upstairs when she stays, or will she spend the whole time on the ground floor?

    If she can manage the stairs I would have thought she could manage the outside steps, perhaps with the help of a handrail?
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 14th May 18, 8:05 AM
    • 26,149 Posts
    • 94,900 Thanks
    Davesnave
    Building regs require new property to be wheelchair accessible, so it won't meet those if there isn't another viable access at the rear.

    The OP hasn't said whether there is or isn't, although the question was raised in Post 6.
    I might be old, but I got to see a lot of good bands...
    • ScorpiondeRooftrouser
    • By ScorpiondeRooftrouser 14th May 18, 8:15 AM
    • 2,640 Posts
    • 4,180 Thanks
    ScorpiondeRooftrouser
    This is another example of why, historically, buying a new build house was always regarded as something you might have to to do if you couldn't afford anything better.
    Developers have managed now to flip this entirely so people are actually paying a premium for new build, as though they were buying a new car.
    It just goes to show.
    • Jane_B
    • By Jane_B 14th May 18, 10:46 AM
    • 79 Posts
    • 28 Thanks
    Jane_B
    Don't ask don't get is my motto, so there is no harm kicking up a bit of a fuss and asking. I recently got a decent chunk of compensation from TW since we were told down the side of our home there would be a gate in the fence (separating mine and the neighboring flats area) however when we moved in this gate was not there, meaning we have no side access to the garden, and the fence is under management by the MA of the flats so nothing we can do.

    Such a minor thing (less annoying than your step issues) and we got a bit back for it so worth a try. What would they have done if you had mobility issues etc.

    Complain and see.
    • getmore4less
    • By getmore4less 14th May 18, 12:02 PM
    • 33,064 Posts
    • 19,935 Thanks
    getmore4less
    Get on the council site planning portal and find out what was approved you will find a load of other stuff there about the site that they won't have told you.

    There may also be applications to make new changes to the site you need to keep checking on a regular basis.
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