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  • FIRST POST
    • Earnshaw24
    • By Earnshaw24 11th May 18, 11:44 AM
    • 7Posts
    • 0Thanks
    Earnshaw24
    Recorded Letter to Landlord - Then Visiting Landlord?
    • #1
    • 11th May 18, 11:44 AM
    Recorded Letter to Landlord - Then Visiting Landlord? 11th May 18 at 11:44 AM
    Hi all,

    I hope you can help,

    I have had an issue with a broken washing machine, which after the estate agent sent out a repairman - he confirmed it was over 20yrs old, couldn't be repaired and required a replacement.

    Consequently, the estate agent have acted as the intermediary between me and the landlord and passed on the news but they have not heard anything back for over 9 weeks and because they apparently can't act without landlord's consent, the washing machine has remained broken.

    My plan at the moment is to send a recorded letter to the landlord directly just so I can confirm he's signed for it and read the letter. Then if there is no response am I within my right to actually visit the landlord's address and ask for a response?

    It would be good to know what you think the next steps should be and at what point any court action should take place,

    Thanks all!

    Gareth
Page 2
    • Cakeguts
    • By Cakeguts 12th May 18, 11:45 AM
    • 5,230 Posts
    • 7,944 Thanks
    Cakeguts
    Don't turn up at the property as the LL will probably be petty and try to evict you, after all they give you 24 hours before coming round to nose in your cupboards....i mean inspect the property
    Originally posted by diggingdude
    There would be absolutely no need for landlord inspections if there were no rogue tenants. Landlords have to do periodic inspections to make sure that the tenant hasn't decided to sublet and move out, move in lots more people to make the rent affordable even though they knew how much it was before they agreed to the rent, turned the small bedroom into a recording studio even though it is joined onto next door, decided to run a scrap yard in the front or back gardens or even inside the house, turn the backgarden into dog kennels, run a business from the house without planning permission, or generally break any of the other things that they had agreed to in the contract that are there to protect their neighbours from antisocial behaviour.
    • ScorpiondeRooftrouser
    • By ScorpiondeRooftrouser 12th May 18, 1:57 PM
    • 2,640 Posts
    • 4,183 Thanks
    ScorpiondeRooftrouser
    Absolutely you are within your rights to go to your landlord's house and ask him something. I am within my rights to turn up at your front door and ask you something. You have the right to do all sorts of crazy and unnecessary things; having a right to do something should never be interpreted as it being a sensible thing to do.
    • FBaby
    • By FBaby 12th May 18, 2:33 PM
    • 17,026 Posts
    • 41,947 Thanks
    FBaby
    If it would help you, I should be happy to undertake a replacement myself and claim back the cost via future rent. I attach a quotation for a comparable washing machine. If this would assist you, please confirm in writing that this is the case and that the cost on the quotation is acceptable.
    A quotation for a 20 year old washing machine! I expect the only places you'd get the equivalent washing machine is in the junk yard of gumtree for free.

    If I was the LL receiving this letter, I would laugh out loud and think 'are they for real!!'
    • Slithery
    • By Slithery 12th May 18, 2:46 PM
    • 985 Posts
    • 1,578 Thanks
    Slithery
    There would be absolutely no need for landlord inspections if there were no rogue tenants.
    Originally posted by Cakeguts
    I disagree. LL inspections have other purposes, like checking for maintenance issues that the tenant isn't aware of.
    • G_M
    • By G_M 12th May 18, 10:27 PM
    • 45,936 Posts
    • 55,464 Thanks
    G_M
    A quotation for a 20 year old washing machine! I expect the only places you'd get the equivalent washing machine is in the junk yard of gumtree for free.

    If I was the LL receiving this letter, I would laugh out loud and think 'are they for real!!'
    Originally posted by FBaby
    There's no suggestion of a quote for a 20 year old w/machine.

    The tenant is asking the LL to replace the existing machine. Granted, the LL may either
    * prefer to mend, or
    * deny all responsibility and do nothing

    but if the LL does wish to replace it, and does prefer the option of letting the tenant buy/install at his (LL's cost), then providing a quote (or Currys advert/whatever) for a comparable new machine makes the approval/agreement simpler.

    I'm not guaranteeing such a letter will work, or be legally enforceable, but it does no harm to try, and some LLs choose to accommodate reasonable tenant requests in situations like this.
    • FBaby
    • By FBaby 13th May 18, 8:19 AM
    • 17,026 Posts
    • 41,947 Thanks
    FBaby
    What I was commenting on GM is the tone of the letter. The way it's phrased comes across very much as 'I'm entitled and you owe me'. As a LL, if I received such a letter, it would irk me because of the tone of it and wouldn't prompt me to do as little as I can as slowly as I can.

    A simple 'Dear LL, I am not sure if the LA has contacted you about the washing machine. I understand from reading the contract that it is your responsibility to fix it, can you confirm that is your understanding to. Can we discuss how to best move forward'.
    • wesleyad
    • By wesleyad 13th May 18, 9:02 AM
    • 338 Posts
    • 286 Thanks
    wesleyad
    What I was commenting on GM is the tone of the letter. The way it's phrased comes across very much as 'I'm entitled and you owe me'. As a LL, if I received such a letter, it would irk me because of the tone of it and wouldn't prompt me to do as little as I can as slowly as I can.
    Originally posted by FBaby
    I didn't read it as that at all, it seemed very mild "You can appreciate, If it would help you, if this would assist you" etc. He's basically giving him an easy out (tenant takes care of all the hassle of buying and fitting, he suffers a minor rent drop for a month)

    I'd say OP has a right to be a bit peeved, 9 weeks after fault is recorded and no communication from LL is out of order (even if it was to deny responsibility).
    • theartfullodger
    • By theartfullodger 13th May 18, 9:25 AM
    • 9,923 Posts
    • 13,505 Thanks
    theartfullodger
    There would be absolutely no need for landlord inspections if there were no rogue tenants. Landlords have to do periodic inspections to make sure that the tenant hasn't decided to sublet and move out, move in lots more people to make ...........blah blah blah....
    Originally posted by Cakeguts
    Not quite:


    The only statutory right for a landlord to do an inspection (LL&T Act 1985 s11{6}), repairing obligations, is to check the place is OK for the tenant to live in
    for the purpose of viewing their condition and state of repair.
    . See
    http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1985/70/section/11


    A landlord needs to do such inspections - for his own sake & to keep repair bills down, as well as avoiding problems with council & tenant.


    Cheers!
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