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  • FIRST POST
    • ultimatron
    • By ultimatron 10th May 18, 2:11 AM
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    ultimatron
    Dismissed for gross misconduct - getting new job
    • #1
    • 10th May 18, 2:11 AM
    Dismissed for gross misconduct - getting new job 10th May 18 at 2:11 AM
    Quite a peculiar situation here:
    I got fired for gross misconduct (due to a few unauthorised absences) one year into my first job out of uni. It is in the financial sector but not a regulated role. After I left the company, I found another job, but is an internship in a regulated role which will lead on to a full time regulated role (client facing). During the application process I never got once asked about reasons for leaving or whether I got dismissed, not even on the application form or background checks, probably due to it being another graduate entry level role. However I'm worried if I get the full time job they will do further background checks and FCA registration which may reveal it? My previous employer has said they will reveal the disciplinary action against me if I applied for a regulated role, but only if it is 'relevant', not sure what they mean by that?
    What should I do? Do I have anything to worry about?
    Last edited by ultimatron; 10-05-2018 at 2:34 AM.
Page 1
    • John-K
    • By John-K 10th May 18, 6:56 AM
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    John-K
    • #2
    • 10th May 18, 6:56 AM
    • #2
    • 10th May 18, 6:56 AM
    Yes, there is a good chance that they will ask for references and ask why you left the previous job. The regulator wants to ensure probity, there is a fit and proper persons bar to be passed. Each banking job I have taken has wanted a detailed history of the past ten years.

    Have you dealt with whatever issue you had that caused you to take unauthorised absences?
    • Les79
    • By Les79 10th May 18, 10:38 AM
    • 202 Posts
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    Les79
    • #3
    • 10th May 18, 10:38 AM
    • #3
    • 10th May 18, 10:38 AM
    I may be looking too much into it, but it seems a bit odd that you describe being sacked for unauthorised absences as "gross misconduct".

    Gross misconduct is only usually used when the employee makes a really bad mistake which requires instant dismissal. If it was just merely an attendance issue then they'd just take you down the normal disciplinary route to manage that, unless of course your attendance was crucial in some way (like, for example, a care worker informing their employer that they are supervising patient X when in fact they are at home; that could be gross misconduct).

    I think you need to be honest if this question is asked (don't volunteer the info unless asked). Also be honest with yourself in your own failings and seek to improve upon this.
    • steampowered
    • By steampowered 10th May 18, 10:55 AM
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    steampowered
    • #4
    • 10th May 18, 10:55 AM
    • #4
    • 10th May 18, 10:55 AM
    Financial services employers will often only provide generic references confirming job title and dates of employment.

    However, if your new job requires a regulated reference, the reference would be more detailed.
    • soolin
    • By soolin 10th May 18, 10:59 AM
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    soolin
    • #5
    • 10th May 18, 10:59 AM
    • #5
    • 10th May 18, 10:59 AM
    Quite a peculiar situation here:
    I got fired for gross misconduct (due to a few unauthorised absences) one year into my first job out of uni. It is in the financial sector but not a regulated role. After I left the company, I found another job, but is an internship in a regulated role which will lead on to a full time regulated role (client facing). During the application process I never got once asked about reasons for leaving or whether I got dismissed, not even on the application form or background checks, probably due to it being another graduate entry level role. However I'm worried if I get the full time job they will do further background checks and FCA registration which may reveal it? My previous employer has said they will reveal the disciplinary action against me if I applied for a regulated role, but only if it is 'relevant', not sure what they mean by that?
    What should I do? Do I have anything to worry about?
    Originally posted by ultimatron
    I think you might have something to worry about if you have to go through the sort of process a graduate family member of mine went through. The intern part was fine, only basic checks, but when a substantive job was offered HR went into everything, and all dates on the CV, including a period of sickness between a masters and PHD had to be accounted for, which meant calls to uni to get written proof of allowed sickness absence and extension on PHD.

    I may be looking too much into it, but it seems a bit odd that you describe being sacked for unauthorised absences as "gross misconduct".

    s.
    Originally posted by Les79
    I can think of several reasons why not turning up for work, especially if warnings or something untoward was going on- could be considered gross misconduct. OP may not wish to elaborate on the real reason and glossing it over as merely unauthorised absences can save a lot of embarrassment.
    I'm the Board Guide for the Ebay Board , Charities Board , Dosh & Disability , Up Your Income and the Local MoneySaving-England board which means I volunteer to help get your forum questions answered and keep the forum running smoothly. However, do remember, board guides don't read every post. If you spot an illegal or inappropriate post then please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com (it's not part of my role to deal with this). Any views are mine and not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.com
    New to Forum? Guide
    • ultimatron
    • By ultimatron 10th May 18, 12:51 PM
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    ultimatron
    • #6
    • 10th May 18, 12:51 PM
    • #6
    • 10th May 18, 12:51 PM
    I think you might have something to worry about if you have to go through the sort of process a graduate family member of mine went through. The intern part was fine, only basic checks, but when a substantive job was offered HR went into everything, and all dates on the CV, including a period of sickness between a masters and PHD had to be accounted for, which meant calls to uni to get written proof of allowed sickness absence and extension on PHD.

    I can think of several reasons why not turning up for work, especially if warnings or something untoward was going on- could be considered gross misconduct. OP may not wish to elaborate on the real reason and glossing it over as merely unauthorised absences can save a lot of embarrassment.
    Originally posted by soolin
    Basically I didn't turn up for a few of the graduate training sessions (and not informing them about the absence), not actual work though.

    Anyway does it automatically mean I cannot work in a regulated role?
    • nicechap
    • By nicechap 10th May 18, 1:01 PM
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    nicechap
    • #7
    • 10th May 18, 1:01 PM
    • #7
    • 10th May 18, 1:01 PM
    Basically I didn't turn up for a few of the graduate training sessions (and not informing them about the absence), not actual work though.

    Anyway does it automatically mean I cannot work in a regulated role?
    Originally posted by ultimatron
    Yes.

    In addition, ifyou canít be arsed to do the basic required training nor have the manners to let your bosses know, itís not the career for you.
    Quote was right and saw into the future.
    • ultimatron
    • By ultimatron 10th May 18, 2:13 PM
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    ultimatron
    • #8
    • 10th May 18, 2:13 PM
    • #8
    • 10th May 18, 2:13 PM
    Yes, there is a good chance that they will ask for references and ask why you left the previous job. The regulator wants to ensure probity, there is a fit and proper persons bar to be passed. Each banking job I have taken has wanted a detailed history of the past ten years.

    Have you dealt with whatever issue you had that caused you to take unauthorised absences?
    Originally posted by John-K
    Yes. It is now a year since that happened. How do you think I should explain to my employer if the reference shows up?
    • soolin
    • By soolin 10th May 18, 2:25 PM
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    soolin
    • #9
    • 10th May 18, 2:25 PM
    • #9
    • 10th May 18, 2:25 PM
    Basically I didn't turn up for a few of the graduate training sessions (and not informing them about the absence), not actual work though.

    Anyway does it automatically mean I cannot work in a regulated role?
    Originally posted by ultimatron
    Those training days probably costs hundreds of pounds and would have been very competitive to get into. You must be able to see why not bothering to go would be such an issue for a potential employer who may be looking to invest a lot of money into your further training.

    However, none of us here can tell you what your new employers will be told and what they will do with that information. Perhaps have a word with them in advance and confess that something might turn up if they do a thorough check.
    I'm the Board Guide for the Ebay Board , Charities Board , Dosh & Disability , Up Your Income and the Local MoneySaving-England board which means I volunteer to help get your forum questions answered and keep the forum running smoothly. However, do remember, board guides don't read every post. If you spot an illegal or inappropriate post then please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com (it's not part of my role to deal with this). Any views are mine and not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.com
    New to Forum? Guide
    • John-K
    • By John-K 10th May 18, 7:15 PM
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    John-K
    Basically I didn't turn up for a few of the graduate training sessions (and not informing them about the absence), not actual work though.

    Anyway does it automatically mean I cannot work in a regulated role?
    Originally posted by ultimatron
    No, not automatically. The restrictions on regulated roles are around issues such as integrity, honesty, and financial probity. Jumping the barrier to avoid a train fare (for example) could be viewed as worse in this respect than a conviction for drink driving.

    One ex-colleague of mine had a job offer rescinded as he did not own up to a caution for shoplifting from decades ago. His honesty was questioned, and that was enough to cost him the job.
    • John-K
    • By John-K 10th May 18, 7:18 PM
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    John-K
    Yes. It is now a year since that happened. How do you think I should explain to my employer if the reference shows up?
    Originally posted by ultimatron
    That is a bit of a tough one, what was the actual reason?

    As I write above, this does not mean that the regulator will have any issue with you, but The employer may. Be honest. If it was the idiocy of youth then say so.

    Again, despite what people may think of banking, we tend to demand, not request, absolute honesty. Do not go into this with a lie if asked.
    • jonnyd281
    • By jonnyd281 10th May 18, 7:57 PM
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    jonnyd281
    Basically I didn't turn up for a few of the graduate training sessions (and not informing them about the absence), not actual work though.

    Anyway does it automatically mean I cannot work in a regulated role?
    Originally posted by ultimatron
    You were in a paid position, even though it was a Graduate Position, therefore the graduate training sessions are actual work since you are being paid to attend them.

    Not attending them would demonstrate to me that you have a poor work ethic, as well as a poor attitude to CPD.
    • Brynsam
    • By Brynsam 10th May 18, 8:13 PM
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    Brynsam
    Basically I didn't turn up for a few of the graduate training sessions (and not informing them about the absence), not actual work though.

    Anyway does it automatically mean I cannot work in a regulated role?
    Originally posted by ultimatron
    The references they will take up will be far more detailed for a permanent role than an internship. I can't see any half-decent employer wanting to employ someone who has behaved as you did and as recently as a year ago - you hardly meet the 'fit and proper person' test, do you? From the way you've worded your explanation, I'm not even sure you've understood how serious it is - not surprising you were sacked.

    Take heart, though; it doesn't mean you will never be able to work in this field - but you might need to prove yourself elsewhere for a few years before anyone will take the risk.
    • steampowered
    • By steampowered 10th May 18, 8:21 PM
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    steampowered
    You will just have to apply for new roles and hope for the best.

    If your reference says you consistently failed to turn up for training, you must expect your job offer to be withdrawn.

    But none of us can tell as we don't know what will end up going onto your regulated reference.

    I think you'll be fine for a non-regulated role. You may also be fine for a regulated role, it depends on what ends up going into your reference.

    As others have said, it is completely unacceptable to fail to turn up to work. Training sessions are work - they are part of the job.
    • John-K
    • By John-K 10th May 18, 8:34 PM
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    John-K
    I do not quite agree with the prophets of doom above, if it were me emplying you, if you had an impressive CV, and appeared very willing to learn, and if you were completely honest and contrite about what you now view as a foolish mistake then I might still be happy to employ you.

    I!!!8217;d be watching you, though, looking out for a slack attitude.
    • ultimatron
    • By ultimatron 10th May 18, 8:59 PM
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    ultimatron
    Thanks for all the replies. I agree there is a risk they would not let me on the role, however, because I am going to do an internship first with them, if I impress them with my performance, will that tip the scale in my favour?
    • John-K
    • By John-K 10th May 18, 9:18 PM
    • 654 Posts
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    John-K
    Thanks for all the replies. I agree there is a risk they would not let me on the role, however, because I am going to do an internship first with them, if I impress them with my performance, will that tip the scale in my favour?
    Originally posted by ultimatron
    It cannot do any harm.

    Impressive for an intern includes never, ever being late. A minute late is late. It does not matter what happened on the tube, or the bus, or the night before, or with your alarm, you must be on time.
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