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    • Pat76
    • By Pat76 9th May 18, 9:11 PM
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    Pat76
    Paying off catalogue with a credit card
    • #1
    • 9th May 18, 9:11 PM
    Paying off catalogue with a credit card 9th May 18 at 9:11 PM
    I've just been accepted for a Barclaycard which has 0% on purchases for 27 months. Can I use this facility to pay off my catalogue bill?
Page 1
    • MallyGirl
    • By MallyGirl 9th May 18, 9:18 PM
    • 2,674 Posts
    • 7,674 Thanks
    MallyGirl
    • #2
    • 9th May 18, 9:18 PM
    • #2
    • 9th May 18, 9:18 PM
    They might accept payment but it would probably not qualify as a purchase at 0%
    • Plus
    • By Plus 9th May 18, 10:31 PM
    • 356 Posts
    • 279 Thanks
    Plus
    • #3
    • 9th May 18, 10:31 PM
    • #3
    • 9th May 18, 10:31 PM
    You might be able to indirectly. For instance, can you pay some of your other bills by credit card? Council tax, utilities, groceries, travel? Then use the money you would have spent to pay off the catalogue.
    • aj23
    • By aj23 10th May 18, 8:42 AM
    • 396 Posts
    • 145 Thanks
    aj23
    • #4
    • 10th May 18, 8:42 AM
    • #4
    • 10th May 18, 8:42 AM
    You might be able to indirectly. For instance, can you pay some of your other bills by credit card? Council tax, utilities, groceries, travel? Then use the money you would have spent to pay off the catalogue.
    Originally posted by Plus
    I'm not sure I'd go as far as saying groceries aka food shopping or travel are bills per se.
    • Vortigern
    • By Vortigern 10th May 18, 8:54 AM
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    • 1,623 Thanks
    Vortigern
    • #5
    • 10th May 18, 8:54 AM
    • #5
    • 10th May 18, 8:54 AM
    I have used a CC to pay a Very catalogue bill. It was not treated as a cash transaction. Whether it's treated as cash or otherwise depends on how the catalogue reports the payment and how the credit card treats that payment. There are too many variables so you'll probably not get a definitive from the card company, the catalogue or this forum.

    You could try making a small payment first?
    • bowlhead99
    • By bowlhead99 10th May 18, 10:17 AM
    • 7,822 Posts
    • 14,288 Thanks
    bowlhead99
    • #6
    • 10th May 18, 10:17 AM
    • #6
    • 10th May 18, 10:17 AM
    I'm not sure I'd go as far as saying groceries aka food shopping or travel are bills per se.
    Originally posted by aj23
    It doesn't really matter what you choose to call them. If you receive the service or the product you get a bill. With groceries you might be at a checkout and you have to pay the amount which shows on the register or self checkout machine, before you can get a receipt for what you paid, pack your bags and leave. Or you might be online at Amazon and pay the bill for the "shopping cart" before they'll deliver it. When buying a train ticket you have to pay for it or you don't get the service. With cable internet you have to pay the bill or they cut off the service. With a mobile phone top-up voucher you have to pay for the voucher or don't get the talktime.

    It's all the same premise. If you want to pay off some sort of debt and end up owing that amount of money on an interest free credit card instead, and the person you owe doesn't take credit cards (or takes them but the card company considers it a cash advance instead of a 'purchase'), your plan might be frustrated. So instead you could use your credit card to pay some other bill for goods and services (whether a utility bill or a bill for a banana at your greengrocer or a bill for the breakfast you just ate at a cafe or a mobile top-up) and then you owe the credit card company at 0%. The money from your pocket or bank account that would have been otherwise spent paying for internet or bananas or breakfast or phone service, is then "spare' to pay the debt.
    Last edited by bowlhead99; 10-05-2018 at 10:19 AM.
    • PeacefulWaters
    • By PeacefulWaters 10th May 18, 12:12 PM
    • 8,320 Posts
    • 10,636 Thanks
    PeacefulWaters
    • #7
    • 10th May 18, 12:12 PM
    • #7
    • 10th May 18, 12:12 PM
    I'm not sure I'd go as far as saying groceries aka food shopping or travel are bills per se.
    Originally posted by aj23
    Call them Englebert if you prefer. Or maybe Cliffard.

    It's still a decent suggestion.
    • aj23
    • By aj23 10th May 18, 2:40 PM
    • 396 Posts
    • 145 Thanks
    aj23
    • #8
    • 10th May 18, 2:40 PM
    • #8
    • 10th May 18, 2:40 PM
    It doesn't really matter what you choose to call them. If you receive the service or the product you get a bill. With groceries you might be at a checkout and you have to pay the amount which shows on the register or self checkout machine, before you can get a receipt for what you paid, pack your bags and leave. Or you might be online at Amazon and pay the bill for the "shopping cart" before they'll deliver it. When buying a train ticket you have to pay for it or you don't get the service. With cable internet you have to pay the bill or they cut off the service. With a mobile phone top-up voucher you have to pay for the voucher or don't get the talktime.

    It's all the same premise. If you want to pay off some sort of debt and end up owing that amount of money on an interest free credit card instead, and the person you owe doesn't take credit cards (or takes them but the card company considers it a cash advance instead of a 'purchase'), your plan might be frustrated. So instead you could use your credit card to pay some other bill for goods and services (whether a utility bill or a bill for a banana at your greengrocer or a bill for the breakfast you just ate at a cafe or a mobile top-up) and then you owe the credit card company at 0%. The money from your pocket or bank account that would have been otherwise spent paying for internet or bananas or breakfast or phone service, is then "spare' to pay the debt.
    Originally posted by bowlhead99
    I'm not having a go, I'm just saying I wouldn't necessarily call those two services 'bills'. I think the OP meant more along the lines of buy now, pay later, a bill that comes in later in the month which you have to pay back the following month or spread out over several months. Typically a bill is something that comes in to you and you have to pay according to the terms of payment, like gas or electricity or in this case a catalogue order, credit services.
    • aj23
    • By aj23 10th May 18, 2:42 PM
    • 396 Posts
    • 145 Thanks
    aj23
    • #9
    • 10th May 18, 2:42 PM
    • #9
    • 10th May 18, 2:42 PM
    Call them Englebert if you prefer. Or maybe Cliffard.

    It's still a decent suggestion.
    Originally posted by PeacefulWaters
    See my above comment.
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