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  • FIRST POST
    • Johnny T
    • By Johnny T 9th May 18, 9:06 AM
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    Johnny T
    Bought a TV but Currys T&Cs don't let me turn it on??
    • #1
    • 9th May 18, 9:06 AM
    Bought a TV but Currys T&Cs don't let me turn it on?? 9th May 18 at 9:06 AM
    Hi all,
    I've ordered a TV online from Currys and it arrives tomorrow. I'm not sure as to whether the size will suit the room and might buy a slightly smaller one instead but won't really know until I see it.


    Curry's T&C's state...
    Separately to the 21 day policy above, and in accordance with your rights when you purchase goods online or over the phone, unwanted items can be returned even if you have opened them for inspection as long as you let us know within 14 calendar days from the day after delivery.

    So far so good....


    However, assuming the TV does fit the room then I would like to try it to make sure I like the picture quality and there aren't any problems with the screen but Curry's T&C's then state....


    You can examine the goods as you would in a shop but to obtain a full refund you must not start using them, install them or input any data/software. The goods must be returned in as new condition and in their original packaging.

    So it sounds like if I were to power the device up (and it could possibly need to update it's software?) and I wasn't happy with the picture (assuming it wasn't a fault but just my own personal preference) then I wouldn't be able to return the item?


    I want to see if this is really the case as, assuming I'm happy with the size of the TV, I would obviously want to inspect the picture / sound quality.


    Thanks for any light you can shed on this.


    John
Page 1
    • lammy82
    • By lammy82 9th May 18, 9:16 AM
    • 356 Posts
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    lammy82
    • #2
    • 9th May 18, 9:16 AM
    • #2
    • 9th May 18, 9:16 AM
    You would be able to inspect the picture and sound quality of a TV in the shop. They have them all set up for this purpose. So I think it should be fine, but there is probably no need for the shop to know that you've done this. If you Google how to factory reset the TV you know that you can do this after examining it to reset it back to its original state.

    Only perform the bare minimum tasks you would expect to do in the shop and you should be OK.
    • bris
    • By bris 9th May 18, 9:19 AM
    • 7,729 Posts
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    bris
    • #3
    • 9th May 18, 9:19 AM
    • #3
    • 9th May 18, 9:19 AM
    Theres a fine line, you can't play about with settings or install apps or updates in a shop so you need to be careful as to what digital foot print turning it on will leave.


    As a TV I would assume just turning it on wouldn't be an issue but tbh I don't know what info the pcb on TV's record.


    You should be ok but just don't sit and watch it for 14 days as that's going beyond what you can do in a shop.


    it's always best to get reviews on the exact model before you buy it, there are always plenty reviews about.
    • davidwood681
    • By davidwood681 9th May 18, 9:43 AM
    • 393 Posts
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    davidwood681
    • #4
    • 9th May 18, 9:43 AM
    • #4
    • 9th May 18, 9:43 AM
    I always think the people who complain about not being able to return goods that have been opened/used/tested are the type of people who would moan the loudest if they had bought goods that had previously been opened/used/tested.
    • Johnny T
    • By Johnny T 9th May 18, 9:55 AM
    • 12 Posts
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    Johnny T
    • #5
    • 9th May 18, 9:55 AM
    • #5
    • 9th May 18, 9:55 AM
    Thanks for the replies Bris / Lammy.


    You would be able to inspect the picture and sound quality of a TV in the shop. They have them all set up for this purpose. So I think it should be fine, but there is probably no need for the shop to know that you've done this. If you Google how to factory reset the TV you know that you can do this after examining it to reset it back to its original state.

    Only perform the bare minimum tasks you would expect to do in the shop and you should be OK.
    Originally posted by lammy82

    Lammy the factory reset is a brilliant idea!!


    I can't imagine the picture being anything but amazing! But I have read that there are sometimes issues and I wanted to be clear of my rights before I switch it on.


    I don't envisage any issues at all but it's always better to be safe than sorry.


    Thanks again Bris and Lammy for all your help.
    • shaun from Africa
    • By shaun from Africa 9th May 18, 10:15 AM
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    shaun from Africa
    • #6
    • 9th May 18, 10:15 AM
    • #6
    • 9th May 18, 10:15 AM
    I always think the people who complain about not being able to return goods that have been opened/used/tested are the type of people who would moan the loudest if they had bought goods that had previously been opened/used/tested.
    Originally posted by davidwood681

    So let's get this right.
    You are using a consumer rights forum to complain about people who avail themselves of their consumer rights to open the packages of most items purchased at a distance and then test them to see if they are suitable?
    Provided that this inspection and testing isn't excessive and doesn't go beyond what you could do in a shop, it's perfectly acceptable and legal for the OP to unbox the TV and see if the picture and sound are suitable.
    • roddydogs
    • By roddydogs 9th May 18, 10:51 AM
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    roddydogs
    • #7
    • 9th May 18, 10:51 AM
    • #7
    • 9th May 18, 10:51 AM
    Would you want to buy a telly that someone had "tried out"? I wouldnt! Trying to repack as original is also hard.
    • Johnny T
    • By Johnny T 9th May 18, 11:32 AM
    • 12 Posts
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    Johnny T
    • #8
    • 9th May 18, 11:32 AM
    • #8
    • 9th May 18, 11:32 AM
    Would you want to buy a telly that someone had "tried out"? I wouldnt! Trying to repack as original is also hard.
    Originally posted by roddydogs
    I tend to take photos on my phone as I unpack stuff just in case it needs to go back.


    But, you are perfectly correct that, given the choice between an item that has been 'opened' (and potentially tried) and a new one, I think everyone would pick the new one.
    • davidwood681
    • By davidwood681 9th May 18, 11:54 AM
    • 393 Posts
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    davidwood681
    • #9
    • 9th May 18, 11:54 AM
    • #9
    • 9th May 18, 11:54 AM
    So let's get this right.
    You are using a consumer rights forum to complain about people who avail themselves of their consumer rights to open the packages of most items purchased at a distance and then test them to see if they are suitable?
    Provided that this inspection and testing isn't excessive and doesn't go beyond what you could do in a shop, it's perfectly acceptable and legal for the OP to unbox the TV and see if the picture and sound are suitable.
    Originally posted by shaun from Africa
    Yep, the British public have far TOO many consumer rights and need a slap of reality every now and again to show how hypocritical they are.

    I don't expect a new product to be delivered that you have had used and opened in your smelly fag and dog ridden home.
    • shaun from Africa
    • By shaun from Africa 9th May 18, 12:10 PM
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    shaun from Africa
    Yep, the British public have far TOO many consumer rights and need a slap of reality every now and again to show how hypocritical they are.

    I don't expect a new product to be delivered that you have had used and opened in your smelly fag and dog ridden home.
    Originally posted by davidwood681
    The "British public"?
    The consumer rights regarding distance selling and unwanted goods returns are EU wide and not limited to the UK and they only came about because of an EU requirement.

    If a retailer receives something back that has been excessively used and is dirty or smells of cigarettes then they are perfectly entitled to refuse a full refund because of this so if you buy something that turns up in this condition, blame the retailer.
    • bris
    • By bris 9th May 18, 12:54 PM
    • 7,729 Posts
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    bris
    Yep, the British public have far TOO many consumer rights and need a slap of reality every now and again to show how hypocritical they are.

    I don't expect a new product to be delivered that you have had used and opened in your smelly fag and dog ridden home.
    Originally posted by davidwood681
    Whilst I agree the fact still remains the law lets you open packages then return them, can't blame the consumer for that.


    I know for a fact that companies get a lot of opened returns, I suppose they must just have them professionally repacked so we never know.
    • LadyDee
    • By LadyDee 9th May 18, 12:56 PM
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    LadyDee
    I always think the people who complain about not being able to return goods that have been opened/used/tested are the type of people who would moan the loudest if they had bought goods that had previously been opened/used/tested.
    Originally posted by davidwood681
    Yes, if I were the next person to buy this TV, I'd be pretty miffed if I thought somebody had just had it on loan "to try". Consumer "rights" gone mad.
    • shaun from Africa
    • By shaun from Africa 9th May 18, 1:13 PM
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    shaun from Africa
    Yes, if I were the next person to buy this TV, I'd be pretty miffed if I thought somebody had just had it on loan "to try". Consumer "rights" gone mad.
    Originally posted by LadyDee

    Does this mean that you have never once purchased something online and returned it because it wasn't suitable?
    • LadyDee
    • By LadyDee 9th May 18, 8:28 PM
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    LadyDee
    Does this mean that you have never once purchased something online and returned it because it wasn't suitable?
    Originally posted by shaun from Africa
    No, I haven't. For a major item like a TV, I do my research, I take measurements, I can spend weeks checking things, asking questions, reading reviews. Hence, if I did ever make a mistake it would be my own silly fault.
    • shaun from Africa
    • By shaun from Africa 9th May 18, 9:55 PM
    • 10,139 Posts
    • 11,409 Thanks
    shaun from Africa
    Yes, if I were the next person to buy this TV, I'd be pretty miffed if I thought somebody had just had it on loan "to try". Consumer "rights" gone mad.
    Originally posted by LadyDee
    Does this mean that you have never once purchased something online and returned it because it wasn't suitable?
    Originally posted by shaun from Africa
    No, I haven't. For a major item like a TV, I do my research, I take measurements, I can spend weeks checking things, asking questions, reading reviews. Hence, if I did ever make a mistake it would be my own silly fault.
    Originally posted by LadyDee
    Never?
    • macman
    • By macman 9th May 18, 10:08 PM
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    macman
    OP's main concern appears to be the screen size. How difficult is it to measure up vs the current TV, or even to dummy it up with a large piece of paper? No need to have the actual TV to check.
    Screen size should be determined by the distance from viewer to screen, nothing else.
    And, even if you do get it delivered, there is no need to switch it on just to determine how large it is...
    No free lunch, and no free laptop
    • George Michael
    • By George Michael 9th May 18, 10:34 PM
    • 3,122 Posts
    • 4,188 Thanks
    George Michael
    OP's main concern appears to be the screen size. How difficult is it to measure up vs the current TV, or even to dummy it up with a large piece of paper? No need to have the actual TV to check.
    Originally posted by macman
    All that will show is how big the screen is and not how the picture looks on that screen when viewed from wherever the people in the room are sitting as the OP does mention about the possibility of not being happy with the picture.

    The picture and sound from a TV in a store can often appear to be vastly different compared to the same TV in your house.
    The ambient lighting, the size and shape of the room, even the floor coverings can make a difference and when spending what may be a very large sum of money, I also don't see anything wrong in taking advantage of the right to inspect and test certain goods in your house to make sure that they are suitable.
    • macman
    • By macman 10th May 18, 10:22 AM
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    macman
    Fine, but the cost of uplifting and repacking a TV that someone simply decides they 'don't like' is ultimately borne by all the other customers of the retailer.
    No free lunch, and no free laptop
    • roddydogs
    • By roddydogs 10th May 18, 10:28 AM
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    roddydogs
    Never?
    Originally posted by shaun from Africa
    Difference between faulty goods and. " Changed my mind"!
    • shaun from Africa
    • By shaun from Africa 10th May 18, 3:34 PM
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    shaun from Africa
    Difference between faulty goods and. " Changed my mind"!
    Originally posted by roddydogs
    I don't think so.
    LadyDee specifically states that she chose to return something to Amazon for a refund which strongly implies it is a change of mind return.
    If the goods were faulty, why didn't she mention this as she did when referring to the goods returned to Humax?
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