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  • FIRST POST
    • magn8p
    • By magn8p 8th May 18, 1:51 PM
    • 242Posts
    • 88Thanks
    magn8p
    Shoots from the stem's base of a Rose tree - should I remove them?
    • #1
    • 8th May 18, 1:51 PM
    Shoots from the stem's base of a Rose tree - should I remove them? 8th May 18 at 1:51 PM
    I am new to the green fingers forum and an amateur in gardening.

    I recently purchased a standard rose tree and potted it in a container (with holes in the bottom for good drainage) as can be seen below. The tree has weathered the harsh colds of "beast from the east" and now ready to bloom.

    However, I recently observed there are a couple of shoots form the base of its stem - can be see in the second picture.

    Is it okay to leave them or should I remove them so that the tree doesn't waste it's energy on the offshoots like that?

    Also, I water the plant every day till I see the water seep through the drain holes - is this a good practice? Is there anything else you think I should do for its health?

    Thanks in advance.

    https://drive.google.com/file/d/1DNamBW2QNDCdAtD5bwjj647p8bZOUHdz/view?usp=sharing

    https://drive.google.com/file/d/1ub8dLut6I0ASyZu2sMpJntuN2rWuCPSb/view?usp=sharing
    Last edited by magn8p; 08-05-2018 at 1:53 PM.
Page 1
    • Farway
    • By Farway 8th May 18, 2:15 PM
    • 6,307 Posts
    • 10,191 Thanks
    Farway
    • #2
    • 8th May 18, 2:15 PM
    • #2
    • 8th May 18, 2:15 PM
    Remove the new shoot, it is from the rootstock, which will be some form of briar [dog rose]

    You can see the grafts onto the root stock, the knobbly bumps on the stem

    If you leave it it will take over and you will have nice dog rose in a pot

    Do not just cut it off, look up "root suckers" to see how to remove it without making it worse
    • magn8p
    • By magn8p 8th May 18, 2:35 PM
    • 242 Posts
    • 88 Thanks
    magn8p
    • #3
    • 8th May 18, 2:35 PM
    • #3
    • 8th May 18, 2:35 PM
    Thank you. Did that right away.

    I have a followup question, I have another rose tree (not as premium as the one showed in the picture, but one that I purchased from Tesco as a bare root), which has struggled to have any foliage since I planted it.

    It was originally planted in a shallow container, thinking this was an issue, repotted it in the ground, but it still seems to struggle. I see its foliage buds come but they are dry out before they become leaves.

    Do you think how I can bring it to life?

    Remove the new shoot, it is from the rootstock, which will be some form of briar [dog rose]

    You can see the grafts onto the root stock, the knobbly bumps on the stem

    If you leave it it will take over and you will have nice dog rose in a pot

    Do not just cut it off, look up "root suckers" to see how to remove it without making it worse
    Originally posted by Farway
    Last edited by magn8p; 08-05-2018 at 2:41 PM.
    • sheramber
    • By sheramber 8th May 18, 7:19 PM
    • 4,844 Posts
    • 3,630 Thanks
    sheramber
    • #4
    • 8th May 18, 7:19 PM
    • #4
    • 8th May 18, 7:19 PM
    Give both roses a rose fertiliser. use a specific rose one , not a general one.

    Usually you feed in April as they start to grow and agin in June/July for the second flush of flowers.

    If you can get it horse manure is ideal for roses.
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