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    • sarahello
    • By sarahello 30th Apr 18, 10:23 AM
    • 6Posts
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    sarahello
    Installing cooker under wooden window shelf
    • #1
    • 30th Apr 18, 10:23 AM
    Installing cooker under wooden window shelf 30th Apr 18 at 10:23 AM
    Hello, my partner and I recently bought our first home. We bought a cooker however on delivery discovered that is couldn't be installed because of regulations. Above the space where the cooker would go is a narrow window (30x90cm) with a wooden shelf at the bottom of the frame. We've been told that because there is a wood directly above where the cooker would go we can't have a cooker there due to the fire risk. Suggestions we have include covering it up with an aluminium sheet (which wouldn't be the most attractive) or get the window bricked up. At the moment we can't afford to put in a new kitchen (we'd like to do so in a couple of years). There are tiles around/underneath the window and I don't particularly want to create an eyesore- we spend a lot of time cooking.

    Has anyone come across this before? Does anyone have any suggestions about what we could do? I was also wondering whether there are any regulations about bricking it up- how it looks on the street, affect on insulation/avoiding damp. I feel a bit clueless where to start so if anyone has any suggestions/advice. All much appreciated!

    Currently we're living off our slow cooker and microwave, but it'd be great to get back to cooking with a hob and oven!

    Thank you all.
Page 1
    • Aylesbury Duck
    • By Aylesbury Duck 30th Apr 18, 10:47 AM
    • 1,854 Posts
    • 2,497 Thanks
    Aylesbury Duck
    • #2
    • 30th Apr 18, 10:47 AM
    • #2
    • 30th Apr 18, 10:47 AM
    Who advised you that an option was to cover the shelf with an aluminium sheet? Will that comply with the 'hot zone' regulations? There would still be flammable material in the hot zone, it would just be covered. If it is permissible, it is probably your only option if you're not remodelling the kitchen yet. Perhaps you can live with the eyesore for a couple of years?

    Bricking the window up may cause a secondary problem. Is it the only window or door that leads directly outside from the kitchen? You're right to consider ventilation because even if you have another window or door, cooking is a major source of moisture and condensation so any ventilation is useful.
    • greenbee
    • By greenbee 30th Apr 18, 11:15 AM
    • 12,595 Posts
    • 219,860 Thanks
    greenbee
    • #3
    • 30th Apr 18, 11:15 AM
    • #3
    • 30th Apr 18, 11:15 AM
    what about removing the wooden windowsill and tiling it? Not sure whether that would comply with regs - depends on what the rest of the window is made from.
    • sarahello
    • By sarahello 30th Apr 18, 11:26 AM
    • 6 Posts
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    sarahello
    • #4
    • 30th Apr 18, 11:26 AM
    • #4
    • 30th Apr 18, 11:26 AM
    That's what I thought about the aluminium sheet. I'm not sure who suggest that. It was someone my partner spoke to.

    There's another much larger window in the kitchen, next to the small one but it wouldn't be above where the cooker is. I think the small one is where the old pantry would've been to let in light. One thing we thought of would be to install an extractor fan in the area where the window currently is if we were to brick it up.
    • sarahello
    • By sarahello 30th Apr 18, 11:27 AM
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    sarahello
    • #5
    • 30th Apr 18, 11:27 AM
    • #5
    • 30th Apr 18, 11:27 AM
    The rest of it is PVC.
    • bris
    • By bris 30th Apr 18, 1:29 PM
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    bris
    • #6
    • 30th Apr 18, 1:29 PM
    • #6
    • 30th Apr 18, 1:29 PM
    Yes it can be covered by a non flammable material. There are some attractive stainless steel and aluminium coverings you can get to do the job.


    I fit gas hobs and often kitchens now use wall boards rather that tiles so the back of the hob has a decorative steel or aluminium sheet that covers the wall board immediately behind the hob, they look good in place.


    Bricking up the window may well look a lot worse from the exterior point of view that a nice decorative covering on the sill.
    • Ectophile
    • By Ectophile 30th Apr 18, 10:18 PM
    • 3,121 Posts
    • 1,991 Thanks
    Ectophile
    • #7
    • 30th Apr 18, 10:18 PM
    • #7
    • 30th Apr 18, 10:18 PM
    Would it be possible to remove the wooden windowsill, and replace it with tiles? Something like floor tiles wouldn't look out of place, and are fireproof.

    That's got to be better and cheaper than bricking up a window.
    If it sticks, force it.
    If it breaks, well it wasn't working right anyway.
    • phill99
    • By phill99 1st May 18, 9:59 AM
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    phill99
    • #8
    • 1st May 18, 9:59 AM
    • #8
    • 1st May 18, 9:59 AM
    It isn't just the window sill that is the problem. The regs go back to a time when people had curtains at their kitchen windows. These obviously are a fire hazard over a cooker.
    Eat vegetables and fear no creditors, rather than eat duck and hide.
    • sarahello
    • By sarahello 13th May 18, 8:33 PM
    • 6 Posts
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    sarahello
    • #9
    • 13th May 18, 8:33 PM
    • #9
    • 13th May 18, 8:33 PM
    Thanks for your responses. We're currently looking at taking out the wooden window sill and sides and replacing it with uPVC. Think that might be the neatest, cheapest option!
    • FreeBear
    • By FreeBear 13th May 18, 8:42 PM
    • 1,538 Posts
    • 2,289 Thanks
    FreeBear
    We're currently looking at taking out the wooden window sill and sides and replacing it with uPVC. Think that might be the neatest, cheapest option!
    Originally posted by sarahello
    uPVC is probably worse than timber above a cooker. A much bigger fire risk in my opinion.
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    Treasure the moments that you have. Savour them for as long as you can for they will never come back again.
    • sarahello
    • By sarahello 20th May 18, 3:24 PM
    • 6 Posts
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    sarahello
    Ah okay. This is getting confusing! Now I'm wondering whether we need to just suck it up and get a whole new kitchen on finance....
    • sarahello
    • By sarahello 20th May 18, 3:36 PM
    • 6 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    sarahello
    and thank you for your advice!
    • maisie cat
    • By maisie cat 20th May 18, 3:44 PM
    • 395 Posts
    • 468 Thanks
    maisie cat
    Is that the only place a cooker can go? If you need to keep the window then perhaps move one of the existing units over to create a new location, depending on where wall cupboards etc are. We have had our cooker in 2 locations, we located in temporarily for 18 months and then moved it to where it is now. The bayonet fitting has the longest hose because we knew we'd want to move it later.
    • Fosterdog
    • By Fosterdog 20th May 18, 10:24 PM
    • 3,807 Posts
    • 6,581 Thanks
    Fosterdog
    Ah okay. This is getting confusing! Now I'm wondering whether we need to just suck it up and get a whole new kitchen on finance....
    Originally posted by sarahello
    Tiling it would be the easiest and probably best solution, it's a quick job and relatively cheap (depending on the tiles used), it looks good, and it is completely safe. Seems a bit extreme to fit a whole new kitchen for the sake of a few quid and a couple of hours work at most.
    • southcoastrgi
    • By southcoastrgi 21st May 18, 11:27 PM
    • 5,334 Posts
    • 3,086 Thanks
    southcoastrgi
    From how you have described it is the window seal overhanging ?
    If so cut back the window seal flush with the wall
    I'm only here while I wait for Corrie to start.

    You get no BS from me & if I think you are wrong I WILL tell you.
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