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  • FIRST POST
    • pollyanna24
    • By pollyanna24 20th Apr 18, 2:10 PM
    • 3,894Posts
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    pollyanna24
    Where to buy a kitten?
    • #1
    • 20th Apr 18, 2:10 PM
    Where to buy a kitten? 20th Apr 18 at 2:10 PM
    Might seem like a silly question, but do I just on the net to find one?

    I want a kitten rather than a cat as it is for my 9 year old daughter and she wants to start from the beginning rather than getting a rescue (which is fair enough - if it was just for me, I would just go to a cats home).

    I don't particularly want a pedigree as the prices seem extortionate, so a mixed one would be okay.
    Pink Sproglettes born 2008 and 2010
    House Worth (approx) - £400,000
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Page 2
    • Carrot007
    • By Carrot007 3rd May 18, 4:15 PM
    • 1,714 Posts
    • 1,455 Thanks
    Carrot007
    She has her heart set on a baby, so 8 weeks old
    Originally posted by pollyanna24
    As long as you understand that under 3 months they will require 4 evenly spaced meals a day so someone has to be with them then good look.

    12 weeks is the optimum rehoming age.
    • Silvertabby
    • By Silvertabby 3rd May 18, 5:59 PM
    • 3,434 Posts
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    Silvertabby
    I know you don't want a pedigree, but a good breeder won't re-home a kitten before 12 weeks for a reason.

    8 weeks is far too young. And as Carrot says, can't be left all day by itself.
    • GwylimT
    • By GwylimT 3rd May 18, 6:57 PM
    • 6,170 Posts
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    GwylimT
    Thanks everyone.

    She has her heart set on a baby, so 8 weeks old. It will be left alone for short periods, my mum gets to my house during the day.

    I wouldn't mind a young one, as in up to a year, but I can see it from a 9 year olds point of view.

    We lost our dog in January, she wants something to cuddle and love and tell her problems too. A dog isn't practical at the moment, so this is a compromise.
    Originally posted by pollyanna24
    Kittens donít leave their mums at eight weeks (thats pups), kittens need to be 13/14 weeks old. A child wanting something isnít a reason to suppirt a back yard breeder, if you wait you will be able to get a rescue kitten if you donít want to pay for an ethically bred kitten.
    • tealady
    • By tealady 3rd May 18, 7:34 PM
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    tealady
    Please get a rescue kitten (or two or three!) A good rescue will match kittens to new owners. Personally I would take on a slightly older cat (6 months plus) as they are still active but past the really needy stage of life. Also their characters should be obvious.
    I have had a few older kitties who have been on the spectrum from being "meet and greet" to "up yours human". Knowing their purrsonalities before I adopted really helped.
    HTH
    Proud to be an MSE nerd
    Judge people by their achievements, not by their mistakes
    • sheramber
    • By sheramber 3rd May 18, 8:39 PM
    • 5,453 Posts
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    sheramber
    Thanks everyone.

    She has her heart set on a baby, so 8 weeks old. It will be left alone for short periods, my mum gets to my house during the day.

    I wouldn't mind a young one, as in up to a year, but I can see it from a 9 year olds point of view.

    We lost our dog in January, she wants something to cuddle and love and tell her problems too. A dog isn't practical at the moment, so this is a compromise.
    Originally posted by pollyanna24

    she wants something to cuddle and love and tell her problems too.

    Then go for an older kitten whose personality is known. Not all kittens want to be cuddled.
    • Savvy_Sue
    • By Savvy_Sue 3rd May 18, 11:37 PM
    • 39,181 Posts
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    Savvy_Sue
    At the risk of being harsh ...
    She has her heart set on a baby, so 8 weeks old. It will be left alone for short periods, my mum gets to my house during the day.

    I wouldn't mind a young one, as in up to a year, but I can see it from a 9 year olds point of view.

    We lost our dog in January, she wants something to cuddle and love and tell her problems too. A dog isn't practical at the moment, so this is a compromise.
    Originally posted by pollyanna24
    You can see it from the 9 year old's point of view, but who's the adult here? If she set her heart on a baby brother or sister to cuddle, would you oblige?

    Sorry, but

    VVVVVVV

    Then go for an older kitten whose personality is known. Not all kittens want to be cuddled.
    Originally posted by sheramber
    This. And actually forget the kitten, forget the baby aspect. You need a cat who likes children, specifically your DD, and will let itself be cuddled and talked to. that's a very particular kind of cat, IMO.

    Is there a rescue you can go and visit, 'just for a look', and see if any of them can change her mind?

    BTW, mine often thought they wanted pets, and I was willing to consider it, but before doing so, one half-term we had their friends' guinea pig, hamster and rabbit to stay. No-one would touch them but me. No more pet talk ...
    Still knitting!
    Completed: 1 adult cardigan, 3 baby jumpers, 3 shawls, 1 sweat band, 3 pairs baby bootees,
    1 Wise Man Knitivity figure + 1 sheep, 2 pairs socks, 2 hats, 2 balaclavas for seamen, 1 balaclava for myself, multiple poppies, 3 peony flowers, 4 butterflies ...
    Current projects: ready to decrease / decreasing on all parts of the mohair cardigan pattern!
    • Spider In The Bath
    • By Spider In The Bath 4th May 18, 7:01 AM
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    Spider In The Bath
    ...You need a cat who likes children, specifically your DD, and will let itself be cuddled and talked to. that's a very particular kind of cat, IMO...
    Originally posted by Savvy_Sue
    Exactly.

    My cat is very friendly - particularly flirty with men and even happy to meet dogs too.

    However, she hates children with a passion. When friends have brought children around she has zoomed out of the house and not come back for hours and will not come back into the house if they are still there.
    • marliepanda
    • By marliepanda 4th May 18, 9:57 AM
    • 6,887 Posts
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    marliepanda
    I find in these situations nothing will convince someone not to take a tiny 8 week old kitten from a backyard breeder who just wants shot of them.

    Then they'll come back in a few months time wondering why the kitten is scratching, biting, unfriendly.

    I have a cat which is very cuddly. He will ask for cuddles and loves them. His brother, brought up exactly the same, always owned by me, same environment, is entirely different. If you want a cat to cuddle and hold and tell stories too, get a stuffed one.

    Babies don't stay babies for long. You don't get an animal because you want a baby one, you get one because you want one.
    • Spider In The Bath
    • By Spider In The Bath 4th May 18, 12:20 PM
    • 1,359 Posts
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    Spider In The Bath
    ...I have a cat which is very cuddly. He will ask for cuddles and loves them. His brother, brought up exactly the same, always owned by me, same environment, is entirely different. If you want a cat to cuddle and hold and tell stories too, get a stuffed one...
    Originally posted by marliepanda
    As well as cats having different personalities the same cat will also react to different people in different ways.

    We have not quite worked out who my cat thinks I am and who my husband is, but she treats us differently. I seem to be 'mum' and my husband 'hero God to be worshiped'.

    So I can brush her, pick her up and turn her over and touch her back feet if she has a cut, tell her off and she obeys (well as much as any cat will), she will follow some of my commands (if I tap on the floor she will come to me), and she sits on my knee or sleeps on me.

    If my husband picked her up and turned her over she would take his face off! She ignores him if her tell her off and only sits on his knee if I am not there. However, when she comes in from outside she looks for him first to have a tickle. If he is busy she will find him and then poke him with her paw till she gets a tickle, she will sit next to him and lean on him and stare adoringly at him (you have to see it to believe it).

    You cannot get a cat and expect it to do what you want. It will do it what it wants and it may not want cuddles (we had one cat who in all the years I owned her only sat on my knee four times) although she would sit next to me.
    • marliepanda
    • By marliepanda 4th May 18, 12:28 PM
    • 6,887 Posts
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    marliepanda
    As well as cats having different personalities the same cat will also react to different people in different ways.

    We have not quite worked out who my cat thinks I am and who my husband is, but she treats us differently. I seem to be 'mum' and my husband 'hero God to be worshiped'.
    Originally posted by Spider In The Bath
    My non cuddly cat is like that. When I lived with my parents he adored my dad, would sit with him constantly. I believe the adoring looks because Ive seen them, but not at me! Now I live with my partner he gets the look, as soon as he gets in bed on a night hes up on his chest nuzzling and purring. Hes obsessed. It must be a man thing for him.

    I mean never mind little old me whose had him for 8 years, fed him, sheltered him, no, no testosterone, no love!
    • Savvy_Sue
    • By Savvy_Sue 4th May 18, 12:44 PM
    • 39,181 Posts
    • 36,086 Thanks
    Savvy_Sue
    If you want a cat to cuddle and hold and tell stories too, get a stuffed one.
    Originally posted by marliepanda
    This made me laugh, but seriously we did buy DS3 one of those stuffed cats which purrs and 'breathes'.
    Still knitting!
    Completed: 1 adult cardigan, 3 baby jumpers, 3 shawls, 1 sweat band, 3 pairs baby bootees,
    1 Wise Man Knitivity figure + 1 sheep, 2 pairs socks, 2 hats, 2 balaclavas for seamen, 1 balaclava for myself, multiple poppies, 3 peony flowers, 4 butterflies ...
    Current projects: ready to decrease / decreasing on all parts of the mohair cardigan pattern!
    • Katiehound
    • By Katiehound 4th May 18, 9:57 PM
    • 4,508 Posts
    • 38,995 Thanks
    Katiehound
    and in the meantime whilst you look for a really suitable cat can your daughter not meet cats and dogs that belong to neighbours and friends and get her cuddles that way as a temporary solution?

    Getting a cat is a long term comittment not a quick fix solution so it should be worth a bit of time spent looking. At nine she should be able to understand that concept..... if it's worth having (the cat) it's worth waiting until you find a perfect (purrfect!) match
    Being polite and pleasant doesn't cost anything!
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    Many thanks

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    • suki1964
    • By suki1964 4th May 18, 10:09 PM
    • 11,404 Posts
    • 30,584 Thanks
    suki1964
    As well as cats having different personalities the same cat will also react to different people in different ways.

    We have not quite worked out who my cat thinks I am and who my husband is, but she treats us differently. I seem to be 'mum' and my husband 'hero God to be worshiped'.

    So I can brush her, pick her up and turn her over and touch her back feet if she has a cut, tell her off and she obeys (well as much as any cat will), she will follow some of my commands (if I tap on the floor she will come to me), and she sits on my knee or sleeps on me.

    If my husband picked her up and turned her over she would take his face off! She ignores him if her tell her off and only sits on his knee if I am not there. However, when she comes in from outside she looks for him first to have a tickle. If he is busy she will find him and then poke him with her paw till she gets a tickle, she will sit next to him and lean on him and stare adoringly at him (you have to see it to believe it).

    You cannot get a cat and expect it to do what you want. It will do it what it wants and it may not want cuddles (we had one cat who in all the years I owned her only sat on my knee four times) although she would sit next to me.
    Originally posted by Spider In The Bath
    Ive loved reading that

    Arthur allows Dh to pick him up but not willingly, the back and the legs are still as boards

    I gave up trying after I got scrabbed a few times

    We get lots of cupboard love though, lots of leg rubbing and tail dancing or rattling the handle of the drawer his treats are in, then once fed he's away again

    Sometimes I wish I had a lap cat but tbh I really love his standoffish ways and it makes the times he does decide to come say hello and stay for a stroke and tickle, all the more special
    if you lend someone £20 and never see that person again, it was probably worth it
    • UKTigerlily
    • By UKTigerlily 10th May 18, 1:24 AM
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    UKTigerlily
    It's possible to get an 8 week old from a rescue, but it seems like you are pandering to what the kid wants, when she isn't old enough to know all the ins and outs. If you can't be home, then an 8 weeks old isn't ok, especially if a lone cat

    Chances are, most cats will not be cuddly. How about a pair of house rabbits? Also cute & fluffy, all sizes available and very clean (can be litter trained) & a lot of fun
    • Murphybear
    • By Murphybear 10th May 18, 4:40 AM
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    Murphybear
    Contact them and register an interest and, in the meantime, take your daughter to visit the rehoming centre a few times. You never know, she may fall in love with one of the adult cats.
    Originally posted by Mojisola
    We went to Cats Protection some years ago to look for a young cat. We both fell in love with a brother and sister aged 6. You never can tell
    • selement
    • By selement 10th May 18, 8:17 AM
    • 504 Posts
    • 1,934 Thanks
    selement
    We adopted 2 kittens last year, they are only ever cuddly on their terms (often the middle of the night) and hate being picked up. They are shy with strangers and took a while to warm up to us when we first got them. One of them will sit on me sometimes (when she wants not when I want!) And the other hardly ever even like to be fussed (she let's me more than my husband, and usually it's one little stoke and then she walks off). I wanted cuddly kittens really but I love my girls even when they aren't cuddly (and when they are it feels well earnt!) But would a 9 yr old feel the same way?
    Trying to lose weight (13.5lb to go)
    • Blondetotty
    • By Blondetotty 10th May 18, 12:00 PM
    • 192 Posts
    • 201 Thanks
    Blondetotty
    I find in these situations nothing will convince someone not to take a tiny 8 week old kitten from a backyard breeder who just wants shot of them.

    Then they'll come back in a few months time wondering why the kitten is scratching, biting, unfriendly.


    Babies don't stay babies for long. You don't get an animal because you want a baby one, you get one because you want one.
    Originally posted by marliepanda


    My thoughts exactly. Very sad especially to take an 8 week old kitten away from its mother. We had to wait until our kitten was 14 weeks and after two vets checks, worming etc before we were allowed to collect him. The lady wouldn't even cut off a week earlier, 14 weeks end of! It makes me so sad when I see kittens advertised as for sale and available at 8 weeks on facebook etc. Purely money making with no concern for the animals.
    • UKTigerlily
    • By UKTigerlily 18th May 18, 3:15 PM
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    UKTigerlily
    My thoughts exactly. Very sad especially to take an 8 week old kitten away from its mother. We had to wait until our kitten was 14 weeks and after two vets checks, worming etc before we were allowed to collect him. The lady wouldn't even cut off a week earlier, 14 weeks end of! It makes me so sad when I see kittens advertised as for sale and available at 8 weeks on facebook etc. Purely money making with no concern for the animals.
    Originally posted by Blondetotty

    In some cases, but rescues rehome at 8 weeks also, so I guess it depends where they are from.
    • Jojo the Tightfisted
    • By Jojo the Tightfisted 20th May 18, 8:36 PM
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    Jojo the Tightfisted
    I've always had rescue kittens, but they have generally been very young - between 5 and 7 weeks - not by choice, but because they'd been rejected/abandoned. The hardest work was the one who hadn't seen humans other than the breeder before 14 weeks when her original owner bought her and was traumatised by the owner's toddler once she was taken 'home', so was a fluffy ball of rage and venom by 9 months when they'd had enough of her. She chilled out in the end and is cuddly and purry, absolutely adoring the OH and happily fussing any adult or child that enters the house, but it was a lot easier handrearing tiny kittens and teaching them how to be a cat/interact with other animals and people than it was convincing a nine month old that we weren't all out to hurt her. And none of my cats are scratchy, bitey things, never have been.
    I could dream to wide extremes, I could do or die: I could yawn and be withdrawn and watch the world go by.

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    Originally posted by colinw
    • ConsumerMatt
    • By ConsumerMatt 20th May 18, 9:39 PM
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    • 43 Thanks
    ConsumerMatt
    There's a lot of good advice already given.

    All I can add/emphasise is; unless it's a pedigree from a reputable breeder with documentation, never pay for a cat. As in, never hand over cold hard cash to a random person whose cat has had kittens. Go to a rescue centre where your money will go towards caring for other rescue cats. A randomer with unwanted kittens should be willing to give the kittens away for free to a good home. Break the cycle of people trying to make a quick buck from irresponsible breeding. I've seen people trying to sell moggy tabby cats for £100+ (for their markings, as if it's a pedigree) and equally as bad visited a pedigree breeder with 20+ bengal kittens from different litters running free around a smelly filthy house and outside in the garden! To the terrible, irresponsible breeder it was simply £5000+ profits running around.
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