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  • FIRST POST
    • slinga
    • By slinga 17th Apr 18, 5:43 PM
    • 1,217Posts
    • 268Thanks
    slinga
    New cooker instalation charge
    • #1
    • 17th Apr 18, 5:43 PM
    New cooker instalation charge 17th Apr 18 at 5:43 PM
    Thinking of buying a new cooker. Single fuel but with electrical connection for oven light and fan.

    I've got the gas connection for the old cooker and a socket for the electrical connection.

    All cooker suppliers want 85 for the connection process.

    This seems steep just to unconnect old cooker gas and reconnect. And of course unplug old cooker and plug in new cooker.

    Do they do more for this at no extra cost.

    Say I went for a dual fuel (gas and elec ) cooker - elec oven, or a full electrical cooker oven and hob. Would they rewire all the way back to the fuse box if a 15 amp socket is required???

    Oh, and hope this is the right forum.
    Last edited by slinga; 17-04-2018 at 5:49 PM.
    It's your money. Except if it's the governments.
Page 1
    • cddc
    • By cddc 17th Apr 18, 5:57 PM
    • 1,137 Posts
    • 1,320 Thanks
    cddc
    • #2
    • 17th Apr 18, 5:57 PM
    • #2
    • 17th Apr 18, 5:57 PM
    I doubt anyone would do that for 85. Especially if they have to run a new cable back to the fuse board. If that is needed I would be surprised if you get any change out of 200.

    To be honest, given the costs in getting Gas Safe Registration , 80 is fair. That is what you are paying for. The job itself is simple.
    • flashg67
    • By flashg67 17th Apr 18, 5:57 PM
    • 2,580 Posts
    • 1,693 Thanks
    flashg67
    • #3
    • 17th Apr 18, 5:57 PM
    • #3
    • 17th Apr 18, 5:57 PM
    ASFAIK, most installation only includes making use of existing connections, so if a new circuit were needed, this would be extra (and better of getting a contractor to do first. Refitting a hose and plugging in is within the scope of many/most diyers, I'd say
    • Aylesbury Duck
    • By Aylesbury Duck 17th Apr 18, 6:01 PM
    • 2,315 Posts
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    Aylesbury Duck
    • #4
    • 17th Apr 18, 6:01 PM
    • #4
    • 17th Apr 18, 6:01 PM
    ASFAIK, most installation only includes making use of existing connections, so if a new circuit were needed, this would be extra (and better of getting a contractor to do first. Refitting a hose and plugging in is within the scope of many/most diyers, I'd say
    Originally posted by flashg67
    OP, don't do this, just pay the 85 and have it done properly and safely.
    • suki1964
    • By suki1964 17th Apr 18, 6:14 PM
    • 11,282 Posts
    • 30,159 Thanks
    suki1964
    • #5
    • 17th Apr 18, 6:14 PM
    • #5
    • 17th Apr 18, 6:14 PM
    It may be within your remit, but the law says only a gas safety engineer can do it so you are stuffed
    if you lend someone 20 and never see that person again, it was probably worth it
    • slinga
    • By slinga 17th Apr 18, 6:55 PM
    • 1,217 Posts
    • 268 Thanks
    slinga
    • #6
    • 17th Apr 18, 6:55 PM
    • #6
    • 17th Apr 18, 6:55 PM
    Just to say I'll get my CH installer to do it as he did last time and he'll do it for his call out charge of 40. I hope. Haven't asked him yet.

    And do I need a 15 amp socket for a full electric cooker.
    Ditto for a dual fuel cooker??
    Or is a 13 amp socket sufficient.
    Last edited by slinga; 17-04-2018 at 7:02 PM.
    It's your money. Except if it's the governments.
    • Aylesbury Duck
    • By Aylesbury Duck 17th Apr 18, 7:12 PM
    • 2,315 Posts
    • 3,137 Thanks
    Aylesbury Duck
    • #7
    • 17th Apr 18, 7:12 PM
    • #7
    • 17th Apr 18, 7:12 PM
    Whatever cooker you are buying will have installer instructions you should be able to see on the web. It will tell you what connection is required and at what rating. Some cookers can be plugged into a socket but most have to be properly wired into a dedicated circuit which must be rated for at least the current the oven draws.
    • Jonesya
    • By Jonesya 17th Apr 18, 8:24 PM
    • 1,480 Posts
    • 909 Thanks
    Jonesya
    • #8
    • 17th Apr 18, 8:24 PM
    • #8
    • 17th Apr 18, 8:24 PM
    Depends on the cooker type but they may need to do some work on the gas pipework and or supply a new hose.

    The electric supply will depend on the cooker - if it just an oven then 13a or 15a will probably be sufficient. If it's electric hobs then normally a 32a supply will be needed.
    • Owain Moneysaver
    • By Owain Moneysaver 17th Apr 18, 8:27 PM
    • 8,521 Posts
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    Owain Moneysaver
    • #9
    • 17th Apr 18, 8:27 PM
    • #9
    • 17th Apr 18, 8:27 PM
    Pay 85 and your cooker is installed immediately when it's delivered.

    Or go elsewhere for installation, possibly pay less, wait in for a second time ...
    A kind word lasts a minute, a skelped erse is sair for a day.
    • J B
    • By J B 17th Apr 18, 8:28 PM
    • 2,918 Posts
    • 1,052 Thanks
    J B
    It may be within your remit, but the law says only a gas safety engineer can do it so you are stuffed
    Originally posted by suki1964
    One of our tenants got his friend to fit their gas cooker.
    When our gas-safe plumber went there on another matter he noticed the 'fitting'. It was screwed up finger tight with some PFTE tape on the *outside* of the connection!!
    • malky39
    • By malky39 17th Apr 18, 8:30 PM
    • 664 Posts
    • 165 Thanks
    malky39
    On the gas side of it the installer will not just simply connect it to you existing gas supply, they will also commission the cooker and make sure all safety devices work as they should. As mentioned there are alot of manufacturers that now make they electrical connection on there cookers standard 13amp with a plug already attached
    • premkit
    • By premkit 18th Apr 18, 9:17 PM
    • 230 Posts
    • 91 Thanks
    premkit
    85 is a standard basic charge for a cooker, if there is any deviation from the standard it will either be charged for or the contractor for the Applianc co will refuse installation until extras have been agreed.
    • bris
    • By bris 18th Apr 18, 9:44 PM
    • 7,897 Posts
    • 6,864 Thanks
    bris
    The hose needs properly fitted, the connection needs tested for gas tightness and the cooker needs commissioned properly to make sure it's not going to kill you. Good luck knowing how to do that.


    It's not just a case of putting it into the bayonet fitting.
    • Ruski
    • By Ruski 19th Apr 18, 8:27 AM
    • 1,578 Posts
    • 927 Thanks
    Ruski
    And the bayonet pipe will need fitting to the cooker too, they don;t come supplied with the hose already fitted and tightness tested

    85 is a bargain

    HTH

    Russ
    Perfection takes time: don't expect miracles in a day
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