Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@. Skimlinks & other affiliated links are turned on

Search

Results: Should I still buy a Diesel SUV

Yes

64.71% • 11 votes

No

29.41% • 5 votes

Yes but as a PCP to gurantee the vaulue at the end of the agreement.

5.88% • 1 votes

You may not vote on this poll

17 votes in total.

  • FIRST POST
    • bloke91
    • By bloke91 16th Apr 18, 6:22 AM
    • 22Posts
    • 0Thanks
    bloke91
    SUV Petrol vs Disel Value
    • #1
    • 16th Apr 18, 6:22 AM
    SUV Petrol vs Disel Value 16th Apr 18 at 6:22 AM
    Hi

    I am intending to start family in the future and therefor intend to purchase a SUV.

    The Mazda CX5 was the SUV of choice for the best in price range and class of SUV. Unfortunately the Petrol has no grunt, so I was going to purchase the SUV as a Diesel with a loan.

    The reason for the Loan vs PHP is down to flexibility as I can change Trade it or sell for something else within the next four years if I wanted and I am not tied any agreement with mileage caps etc.

    The Mazda CX5 is EURO6 approved but obviously with the government’s recent announcement relating to Diesels and the drop in sales I am nervous about purchasing a Diesel now.

    I fear it won’t be worth much in 4 years’ time when the loan is paid, there won’t be much demand for Diesels or it won’t be worth as much if I want to trade it in and swop it within the next 4 years.

    Obviously Diesels tend to be the best choice within the SUV market, but I am now considering if I would be bettering buy a different SUV in Petrol due to the Diesel issue. Perhaps a Seat Ateka or something.

    Any advice would be appreciated as I am really concerned and confused at the moment. It’s a lot of money to spend and I don’t want to make the wrong decision.
Page 1
    • DUTR
    • By DUTR 16th Apr 18, 6:42 AM
    • 11,290 Posts
    • 6,471 Thanks
    DUTR
    • #2
    • 16th Apr 18, 6:42 AM
    • #2
    • 16th Apr 18, 6:42 AM
    Unless you are a trader, you buy a car that suits your wants and needs and use it, whatever it is worth to the prospective buyer when you come to sell is a bonus.
    You can maximise the return by keeping it in good condition and avoiding prangs.
    • loskie
    • By loskie 16th Apr 18, 7:11 AM
    • 1,267 Posts
    • 760 Thanks
    loskie
    • #3
    • 16th Apr 18, 7:11 AM
    • #3
    • 16th Apr 18, 7:11 AM
    if you intend to start a family a bed is probably a better idea than an SUV.

    Seriously though why do you think you "need" and SUV?

    A decent estate car may suit your needs better.
    Re diesel v petrol you dont say what type of driving and how many miles you will do.
    • bloke91
    • By bloke91 16th Apr 18, 7:29 AM
    • 22 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    bloke91
    • #4
    • 16th Apr 18, 7:29 AM
    Yearly Miles I will do.
    • #4
    • 16th Apr 18, 7:29 AM
    It will be about 15k a year.
    • IanMSpencer
    • By IanMSpencer 16th Apr 18, 8:18 AM
    • 1,462 Posts
    • 1,080 Thanks
    IanMSpencer
    • #5
    • 16th Apr 18, 8:18 AM
    • #5
    • 16th Apr 18, 8:18 AM
    My take is that Government has nailed its colours to the mast with its statement that it will not punish diesel drivers for following government advice so expect diesel anxiety to calm over the next year or so. Also a Euro 6 diesel is pretty much clean so no guilt trips required. Bad diesel is those prior to the Euro 5 spec (i.e. no particulate filters - Euro 5 to Euro 6 is not a major step, just an improvement in NO emissions).

    Electric cars aren't there yet, but in about 5 years time the big manufacturers will be geared up for electric. However, that is the new market, the secondhand market will still be made up of today's cars so there will not be a significant drop in value.

    I'm not a great fan of the Mazda, it ticks lots of boxes in features, but in common with other Mazdas, they achieve some of their performance check boxes by going lightweight by not putting enough soundproofing in, so they can be quite boomy (our old Mazda 6 was very noisy at motorway speeds). Make sure you get a test drive at realistic driving speeds.
    • Mercdriver
    • By Mercdriver 16th Apr 18, 9:27 AM
    • 1,640 Posts
    • 1,120 Thanks
    Mercdriver
    • #6
    • 16th Apr 18, 9:27 AM
    • #6
    • 16th Apr 18, 9:27 AM
    I have the CX5 (the more powerful 175 PS Sport Nav)and it is a comfortable ride. I don't find it especially noisy on the motorway, though it punishes you for speeding with the fuel economy. If I drive it sensibly I get an indicated 44mpg if not, then it doesn't go above 40. It appears to like A roads more than motorways for fuel economy as my best fuel economy has been when in Scotland.

    It has a good and very practical boot, but for sheer space as stated above an estate would have more. I bought mine on a 0% conditional sale from a main dealer trading in a late 2010 E Class Mercedes. The E class was far better on fuel, but less practical.

    I chose to not go via PCP as my mileage tends to be high - I'm on 14k since purchase in July last year already - serviced the car through Mazda main dealer at 10k following purchase.
    • LandyAndy
    • By LandyAndy 16th Apr 18, 11:26 AM
    • 24,273 Posts
    • 51,287 Thanks
    LandyAndy
    • #7
    • 16th Apr 18, 11:26 AM
    • #7
    • 16th Apr 18, 11:26 AM
    if you intend to start a family a bed is probably a better idea than an SUV.

    Seriously though why do you think you "need" and SUV?

    A decent estate car may suit your needs better.
    Re diesel v petrol you dont say what type of driving and how many miles you will do.
    Originally posted by loskie

    This. I have a Mazda6 estate and it is as big as you would need and then some and the load space is more usable.


    Of course it isn't as 'fashionable' as an SUV.
    • Raxiel
    • By Raxiel 16th Apr 18, 12:11 PM
    • 655 Posts
    • 357 Thanks
    Raxiel
    • #8
    • 16th Apr 18, 12:11 PM
    • #8
    • 16th Apr 18, 12:11 PM
    With child #2 imminent, and in need of a new car we were recently looking for an SUV. Our reasoning being the elevated seating would make it easier for strapping 2 kids into seats.

    Of course, SUV's being in fashion right now means you're paying a 'trend tax' on them. There's another class of vehicle that has an elevated seating position, and isn't 'cool' (probably the opposite), the humble MPV.

    If the seating position isn't a concern then I'd agree with what others have said about estates. If an SUV is what you really want, then go for it, but you should at least consider whether a people carrier will fit your needs and your budget. In the end we went for a Ford B-Max (basically a tall Fiesta) good access, reasonable boot space (for us, YMMV) easy to park and well under our budget.

    As for fuel, 15k should be enough mileage to avoid DPF grief, but be prepared to keep it running if it decides to start a regen just as you reach your destination.
    • fatrab
    • By fatrab 16th Apr 18, 12:22 PM
    • 844 Posts
    • 1,986 Thanks
    fatrab
    • #9
    • 16th Apr 18, 12:22 PM
    • #9
    • 16th Apr 18, 12:22 PM
    I'm also heading into SUV ownership when my current car sells. It will be a diesel as I cover up to 2000 miles per month on business but need the size and convenience of the SUV. And I'm not one bit worried about the diesel concerns that are doing the rounds at the moment.

    In my opinion PCP doesn't exist to help buyers, it's there to trap them.

    Take out a loan, buy a diesel and get it paid off as quickly as possible would be my advice.

    Best of luck
    You can have results or excuses, but not both.
    May's targets - Lose 1 stone - 6lbs off, 25/31 AFDs, 15/18 lunches.
    37 x £2 coins (#32) - Wannabe debt free by Dec 2022
    • Geodark
    • By Geodark 16th Apr 18, 12:47 PM
    • 791 Posts
    • 519 Thanks
    Geodark
    if you intend to start a family a bed is probably a better idea than an SUV.

    Seriously though why do you think you "need" and SUV?

    A decent estate car may suit your needs better.
    Re diesel v petrol you dont say what type of driving and how many miles you will do.
    Originally posted by loskie
    Exactly this, I have an Astra Estate and the boot on it is huge! I also have an SUV, a Freelander, but that is purely my "Toy Car" which I use when me and my son go fishing - the boot in the Astra is miles bigger than the Freelander one. And the Astra has much better economy - probably twice as a good as the Freelander.
    • Gloomendoom
    • By Gloomendoom 16th Apr 18, 1:01 PM
    • 13,971 Posts
    • 18,395 Thanks
    Gloomendoom
    As for fuel, 15k should be enough mileage to avoid DPF grief, but be prepared to keep it running if it decides to start a regen just as you reach your destination.
    Originally posted by Raxiel
    Annual mileage isn't really a good indication of whether you will get DPF grief or not, it's type of driving you do that matters.

    I have a DPF equipped car that averages just less than 5k a year. The vast majority of that mileage is long distances on A roads or motorways. No DPF problems.
    Never argue with stupid people, they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience.” - Mark Twain
    • IanMSpencer
    • By IanMSpencer 16th Apr 18, 3:43 PM
    • 1,462 Posts
    • 1,080 Thanks
    IanMSpencer
    I've got a C Class Merc and a Q3. The Q3 was chosen as the least 4x4 styling cross-over car we could find. The boot space in the C Class is far more usable. The driving position in the Q3 is better. The Q3 is an easy drive, no sense of being in a wallowy, heavy beast, even with the base level tyres. In fact, it is a far more comfortable car due to the Merc having low profile tyres and firm suspension.

    I slightly prefer the Merc on balance, mainly due to finding the Audi a bit quirky, but they are both great cars to drive.
    • gord115
    • By gord115 16th Apr 18, 4:51 PM
    • 855 Posts
    • 228 Thanks
    gord115
    Skoda Octavia or Superb Diesel.
    Great cars
    • Typhoon2000
    • By Typhoon2000 16th Apr 18, 8:12 PM
    • 859 Posts
    • 420 Thanks
    Typhoon2000
    CX5 is really a cross over, or a jacked up road/ Estate cars. Not really an SUV. As you are not doing many miles you won!!!8217;t make up the extra cost of the deisel on fuel saving, and you have the worry of DPF problems to boot.

    The new Honda CRV ( jacked up civic) with the 1.5 Turbo petrol seems to have plenty of go.
    • Tarambor
    • By Tarambor 17th Apr 18, 7:11 AM
    • 2,874 Posts
    • 2,077 Thanks
    Tarambor
    It will be a diesel as I cover up to 2000 miles per month on business but need the size and convenience of the SUV.
    Originally posted by fatrab
    SUVs don't have that much room inside them. A Ford Mondeo Estate has more room inside than most SUVs. The only thing big about a SUV is the height, the tyres and the fuel bill. The width, the length are no different to a normal car.

    The Mazda CX5 the OP is looking at has boot space the same size as a Ford Focus Estate.
    • fatrab
    • By fatrab 17th Apr 18, 7:45 AM
    • 844 Posts
    • 1,986 Thanks
    fatrab
    SUVs don't have that much room inside them. A Ford Mondeo Estate has more room inside than most SUVs. The only thing big about a SUV is the height, the tyres and the fuel bill. The width, the length are no different to a normal car.

    The Mazda CX5 the OP is looking at has boot space the same size as a Ford Focus Estate.
    Originally posted by Tarambor
    It's the ground clearance that appeals, along with the raised seating position. I work in the north of Scotland on sites that regularly involve mud, snow, standing water, loose gravel and grass growing up the middle of the track road! Also have a 7 month old, so the raised back seat height will help in that department too.

    I've been running Subarus for the past 20 years so I'm well used to the hefty bills, a diesel SUV will be cheaper to run in every way. I need 4wd so an older Mondeo is out of the question at the moment. I'm only looking to spend around £10k. Oldest son is currently looking for a decent 2.2 tdci Titanium X Sport estate, great cars.
    You can have results or excuses, but not both.
    May's targets - Lose 1 stone - 6lbs off, 25/31 AFDs, 15/18 lunches.
    37 x £2 coins (#32) - Wannabe debt free by Dec 2022
    • Gloomendoom
    • By Gloomendoom 17th Apr 18, 9:28 AM
    • 13,971 Posts
    • 18,395 Thanks
    Gloomendoom
    It's the ground clearance that appeals, along with the raised seating position.
    Originally posted by fatrab
    That was the reason we first bought an SUV. We had coped reasonably well up to that point with a FWD hatchback but after ripping the undertray off, it was obvious that something needed to change.

    Interestingly, the SUV's V5 said it was an "Estate car".
    Never argue with stupid people, they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience.” - Mark Twain
    • Herzlos
    • By Herzlos 17th Apr 18, 10:43 AM
    • 7,246 Posts
    • 6,510 Thanks
    Herzlos
    Also rural Scotland but we've had a crossover for a couple of years and the 4wd and ground clearance pretty handy. A few times avoiding us needing to detour round stuff.

    Brilliant for bumping up kerbs too, parking in fields and using farm tracks.

    Things that probably aren't useful most most, I'll admit, but it's making it hard for us to consider going back to a regular estate.
    • IanMSpencer
    • By IanMSpencer 17th Apr 18, 5:11 PM
    • 1,462 Posts
    • 1,080 Thanks
    IanMSpencer
    SUV us a meaningless set of initials, there is no definition of what it is, it is not a 4x4 (but can be) it might look like a Land Rover (but might look like an inflated car). Crossover doesn't really help because we don't know what is crossing over to which!

    I would not specify 4x4 on a crossover/SUV unless you are specifically buying to drive in challenging territory, there is nothing about the inflated cars that makes 4x4 more desirable than on an ordinary car.
    • kirmal12
    • By kirmal12 17th Apr 18, 8:50 PM
    • 3 Posts
    • 4 Thanks
    kirmal12
    I've a new CX-5 and it's great, beats the CRV i had before in every way. Only driven 1200 miles so far and it's averaging 52MPG and that's mixed driving, will only get better as the engine loosens up. I don't find it noisy, certainly quieter than the CRV and the handling is far superior. The new model regenerates far quicker and it certainly isn't obvious when it does. We've decided to stick with diesel at the moment, may venture to Hybrid with the next car. Mazda are working on a petrol engine that'll be a friendly as a EV.
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

122Posts Today

1,750Users online

Martin's Twitter
  • It's the start of mini MSE's half term. In order to be the best daddy possible, Im stopping work and going off line? https://t.co/kwjvtd75YU

  • RT @shellsince1982: @MartinSLewis thanx to your email I have just saved myself £222 by taking a SIM only deal for £7.50 a month and keeping?

  • Today's Friday twitter poll: An important question, building on yesterday's important discussions: Which is the best bit of the pizza...

  • Follow Martin