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    • mariat
    • By mariat 13th Apr 18, 9:04 PM
    • 142Posts
    • 18Thanks
    mariat
    Injected damp course ball park needed
    • #1
    • 13th Apr 18, 9:04 PM
    Injected damp course ball park needed 13th Apr 18 at 9:04 PM
    We have had a survey done on a house we've offered to buy, and one of the things that needs sorting is the rising damp. But, trying to get someone out to quote when we haven't actually bought the house yet is nigh on impossible. We need figures to be able to re-negotiate the price, so can anyone please give me a ball park figure for an injected damp course on a 3 bed semi detached period cottage, interior and exterior walls, in Norfolk?
Page 1
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 13th Apr 18, 9:15 PM
    • 24,917 Posts
    • 68,299 Thanks
    Doozergirl
    • #2
    • 13th Apr 18, 9:15 PM
    • #2
    • 13th Apr 18, 9:15 PM
    I bet it doesn't have rising damp at all.

    Usually there is a simple maintenance problem that needs a cheap fix. Usually it is the damp proof course being breached by earth, a driveway laid right up to the wall or walls rendered too low and over the DPC.

    Or there is no problem at all, no evidence of damp but the surveyor's damp detector (which doesn't measure damp at all, but conductivity) gets a reading and suddenly there's a problem.

    Have a look at the Heritage House website.

    There is a whole expensive and messy sector of the industry that feeds off people's lack of knowledge.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • mariat
    • By mariat 14th Apr 18, 11:12 AM
    • 142 Posts
    • 18 Thanks
    mariat
    • #3
    • 14th Apr 18, 11:12 AM
    • #3
    • 14th Apr 18, 11:12 AM
    That may be the case, but there's staining to the walls and the plaster has blown. I will have a look at the site you mentioned, but still need a costing, just in case.

    It's a period property so no damp course, also the interior, as well as exterior, walls are affected.
    • FreeBear
    • By FreeBear 14th Apr 18, 12:52 PM
    • 1,506 Posts
    • 2,224 Thanks
    FreeBear
    • #4
    • 14th Apr 18, 12:52 PM
    • #4
    • 14th Apr 18, 12:52 PM
    It's a period property so no damp course, also the interior, as well as exterior, walls are affected.
    Originally posted by mariat
    Period property ?
    Is this a listed property, in which case, you will need to talk to the local Conservation Officer before doing any work.

    If it isn't listed, then you have free reign to do pretty much anything - Not all work recommended by surveyors and damp proof "specialists" will be required. Depending on the age of this property, the damp proof course could be anything from a thin bitumastic felt layer, a layer of slates, a course of engineering bricks. Depending on where in Norfolk, the lower section of the walls could be flint which is impervious to water.

    The one thing you do NOT want to be doing is repointing with cement mortar, rendering the outside with cement (or K-rend), and using waterproof plaster (or gypsum) internally. Traditional materials such as local chalk, sand, and lime will be your friends. If you need advice & assistance with period properties, have a chat with Philip Hendry & Sons, Dereham, NR20 5RT or look up Mike Wye in Beaworthy.

    If you do get conned in to injected DPC along with waterproof renders & plaster, expect to be stripping it all out again in 10 years or so and fixing a whole raft of other problems.
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    • Sam160612
    • By Sam160612 14th Apr 18, 2:55 PM
    • 4 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    Sam160612
    • #5
    • 14th Apr 18, 2:55 PM
    • #5
    • 14th Apr 18, 2:55 PM
    DONT use the injection creams they are rubbish! I agree have a look at heritage housing, or Peter Ward on YouTube. A simple fix will sort your damp out, rising damp is so rare to actually happen. Most likely your gutters or something need fixing.
    • Sam160612
    • By Sam160612 14th Apr 18, 2:57 PM
    • 4 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    Sam160612
    • #6
    • 14th Apr 18, 2:57 PM
    • #6
    • 14th Apr 18, 2:57 PM
    If itís an old property, you probably have the wrong plaster on your house. I think you may have Gypsum plaster, you need to get rid of that and put Lime plaster for old properties so It can breath.
    • mariat
    • By mariat 15th Apr 18, 1:11 PM
    • 142 Posts
    • 18 Thanks
    mariat
    • #7
    • 15th Apr 18, 1:11 PM
    • #7
    • 15th Apr 18, 1:11 PM
    Not a listed property, just mid 1800's.

    I've read up on damp on the Heritage House website, very interesting. I think our best bet is to move in and see how it goes (taking for granted that the purchase completes). We need to have central heating installed which means hacking off some of the old plaster anyway, so I'll look into getting the downstairs walls lime plastered. I've always loved the look of lime wash on old walls so this would give me the perfect excuse. The exterior also needs repointing so I'll stipulate that's done with lime mortar. Thanks to you all for the info and advice, I'm a lot wiser now than before I asked.
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