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  • FIRST POST
    • mustachio
    • By mustachio 13th Apr 18, 1:59 PM
    • 61Posts
    • 14Thanks
    mustachio
    Solicitor increased fee-purchase of freehold and parking space
    • #1
    • 13th Apr 18, 1:59 PM
    Solicitor increased fee-purchase of freehold and parking space 13th Apr 18 at 1:59 PM
    Hi,

    I am purchasing a freehold (with another flat) and a parking space altogether.

    Got a letter from solicitor advising that his fee had increased by 200 (to a total of 780).

    This is due to complete early next week-how do others feel about this? The solicitor states: "my costs have inevitably had to increase beyond the original estimate because I had to spend so much extra time sorting out the insurance, apportionments and dealing with the other flat (not involved with the purchase.

    Do I just have to pay?
Page 1
    • davidmcn
    • By davidmcn 13th Apr 18, 2:05 PM
    • 7,394 Posts
    • 7,458 Thanks
    davidmcn
    • #2
    • 13th Apr 18, 2:05 PM
    • #2
    • 13th Apr 18, 2:05 PM
    Do I just have to pay?
    Originally posted by mustachio
    200 sounds quite reasonable for the additional work.
    • Cakeguts
    • By Cakeguts 13th Apr 18, 2:07 PM
    • 4,180 Posts
    • 5,909 Thanks
    Cakeguts
    • #3
    • 13th Apr 18, 2:07 PM
    • #3
    • 13th Apr 18, 2:07 PM
    Hi,

    I am purchasing a freehold (with another flat) and a parking space altogether.

    Got a letter from solicitor advising that his fee had increased by 200 (to a total of 780).

    This is due to complete early next week-how do others feel about this? The solicitor states: "my costs have inevitably had to increase beyond the original estimate because I had to spend so much extra time sorting out the insurance, apportionments and dealing with the other flat (not involved with the purchase.

    Do I just have to pay?
    Originally posted by mustachio

    What you are saying is that you don't feel that the solicitor is entitled to be paid for extra time he spent doing your job? I hope your employer decides not to pay you for several hours of your job next week on the basis that they could have got it done in less time.
    • JoJo1978
    • By JoJo1978 13th Apr 18, 2:07 PM
    • 342 Posts
    • 423 Thanks
    JoJo1978
    • #4
    • 13th Apr 18, 2:07 PM
    • #4
    • 13th Apr 18, 2:07 PM
    Yes unless your contract clearly states you hired them on a fixed fee basis. If there was extra work the amount sounds reasonable, your original engagement letter probably states what their hourly rate is, so you can work out how much extra time you've been charged for. You can argue now if you think it's unfair and risk delaying completion (they need payment on completion) or pay up now and try for a rebate later. Personally for the sake of a couple of hundred I'd let it go, especially if your engagement letter states this may happen.
    Hamster in the wheel (London) 1999-2017
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    • G_M
    • By G_M 13th Apr 18, 2:12 PM
    • 43,847 Posts
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    G_M
    • #5
    • 13th Apr 18, 2:12 PM
    • #5
    • 13th Apr 18, 2:12 PM
    Yes unless your contract clearly states you hired them on a fixed fee basis. .
    Originally posted by JoJo1978
    and even if it was a fixed fee, that would have been for a specified job. If other unexpected and unspecified elements of work arose, the solicitor can charge for these on top.
    • mustachio
    • By mustachio 13th Apr 18, 2:19 PM
    • 61 Posts
    • 14 Thanks
    mustachio
    • #6
    • 13th Apr 18, 2:19 PM
    • #6
    • 13th Apr 18, 2:19 PM
    What you are saying is that you don't feel that the solicitor is entitled to be paid for extra time he spent doing your job? I hope your employer decides not to pay you for several hours of your job next week on the basis that they could have got it done in less time.
    Originally posted by Cakeguts
    No not at all. I am not saying I won't pay the money I am querying here to get an informed opinion if it is fair to do so since the fee had been quoted prior to starting the purchase.

    For example if you agree to work in a shop for 10 an hour and it is busy you don't start asking your boss for 14 an hour. Similarly when it's quiet you don't accept being paid 7 an hour.

    The solicitor knows the seller and the situation very well so it was unexpected. As it happens I will be paying the additional money.
    Last edited by mustachio; 13-04-2018 at 2:23 PM.
    • Cakeguts
    • By Cakeguts 13th Apr 18, 2:23 PM
    • 4,180 Posts
    • 5,909 Thanks
    Cakeguts
    • #7
    • 13th Apr 18, 2:23 PM
    • #7
    • 13th Apr 18, 2:23 PM
    No not at all. I am not saying I won't pay the money I am querying here to get an informed opinion if it is fair to do so since the fee had been quoted prior to starting the purchase.

    For example if you agree to work in a shop for 10 an hour and it is busy you don't start asking your boss for 14 an hour. Similarly when it's quiet you don't accept being paid 7 an hour.

    The solicitor knows the seller and the situation very well so it was unexpected.
    Originally posted by mustachio
    The problem is that a solicitor can't tell how complicated something is likely to be until they start on it. He has told you that he had to spend more time on it than he expected to do. So he is just asking you to pay for the extra time he spent I think this is fair enough.
    • Tiglet2
    • By Tiglet2 13th Apr 18, 2:35 PM
    • 95 Posts
    • 56 Thanks
    Tiglet2
    • #8
    • 13th Apr 18, 2:35 PM
    • #8
    • 13th Apr 18, 2:35 PM
    I work at a conveyancing firm where a lot of our work is fixed fee, but this is for a straight forward sale or purchase. Recently a potential client rang our sales department to get a quote for a "remortgage", so the sales department provided a quote which the client accepted. It later transpires that the client is intending to divide her title into two, sell the original house on one half of the title, then build a new house on the other half with the remortgage monies and the proceeds of the sale of the original property. The solicitor wrote a similar letter to yours explaining that there would be an uplift in fees for the additional work. Client wasn't happy but the solicitor would not work all the extra hours the transaction needed for a couple of hundred pounds.
    • davidmcn
    • By davidmcn 13th Apr 18, 2:53 PM
    • 7,394 Posts
    • 7,458 Thanks
    davidmcn
    • #9
    • 13th Apr 18, 2:53 PM
    • #9
    • 13th Apr 18, 2:53 PM
    For example if you agree to work in a shop for 10 an hour and it is busy you don't start asking your boss for 14 an hour.
    Originally posted by mustachio
    I don't think this is a great analogy to start with, but anyway...


    It's more like if you agree to do a five hour shift for 50, and end up having to work an eight hour shift, but your manager is grumbling about paying you more than 50.
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