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    • retiredandskint
    • By retiredandskint 6th Apr 18, 8:40 PM
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    retiredandskint
    Robot lawn mowers
    • #1
    • 6th Apr 18, 8:40 PM
    Robot lawn mowers 6th Apr 18 at 8:40 PM
    Has anyone got one, used one or have any advice?

    Although it's not a large lawn I'm finding it increasingly difficult to mow it and wondered whether it made economic sense to buy one as opposed to getting someone in to mow it.

    My mower has just died so I need to buy a new one anyway.
Page 1
    • peter_the_piper
    • By peter_the_piper 6th Apr 18, 8:45 PM
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    peter_the_piper
    • #2
    • 6th Apr 18, 8:45 PM
    • #2
    • 6th Apr 18, 8:45 PM
    With the electronics inside I would imagine the repair costs could be quite frightening.
    I'd rather be an Optimist and be proved wrong than a Pessimist and be proved right.
    • retiredandskint
    • By retiredandskint 6th Apr 18, 8:48 PM
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    retiredandskint
    • #3
    • 6th Apr 18, 8:48 PM
    • #3
    • 6th Apr 18, 8:48 PM
    With the electronics inside I would imagine the repair costs could be quite frightening.
    Originally posted by peter_the_piper
    The Bosch one has a five year guarantee.
    • Justagardener
    • By Justagardener 7th Apr 18, 12:59 PM
    • 141 Posts
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    Justagardener
    • #4
    • 7th Apr 18, 12:59 PM
    • #4
    • 7th Apr 18, 12:59 PM
    I have only seen them working. They do quite a good job from what I've seen. There are some downsides....no stripes, not being able to cut into corners and small wheel marks all over the lawn where it's been motoring around but they do keep the grass at a good level all summer...you would have to make sure there was no debris on the lawn like fallen sticks etc and go round after a dog if you had one! They do seem expensive though but if your lawn is small you might get away with around 500. Battery mowers and cordless tools are really impressive now and cheap. With no servicing costs and easy to use etc it might be worth looking at those.
    • retiredandskint
    • By retiredandskint 7th Apr 18, 1:25 PM
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    retiredandskint
    • #5
    • 7th Apr 18, 1:25 PM
    • #5
    • 7th Apr 18, 1:25 PM
    I have only seen them working. They do quite a good job from what I've seen. There are some downsides....no stripes, not being able to cut into corners and small wheel marks all over the lawn where it's been motoring around but they do keep the grass at a good level all summer...you would have to make sure there was no debris on the lawn like fallen sticks etc and go round after a dog if you had one! They do seem expensive though but if your lawn is small you might get away with around 500. Battery mowers and cordless tools are really impressive now and cheap. With no servicing costs and easy to use etc it might be worth looking at those.
    Originally posted by Justagardener
    I'm not bothered about stripes and dog free. My main concerns are I'm a full time carer for my husband, who has dementia and I suffer with arthritis. I'm just looking for an easy option that will keep the garden tidy with minimum effort.

    My only other thought was removing the grass altogether or artificial grass.
    • Silvertabby
    • By Silvertabby 7th Apr 18, 1:59 PM
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    Silvertabby
    • #6
    • 7th Apr 18, 1:59 PM
    • #6
    • 7th Apr 18, 1:59 PM
    Next door neighbour has had a Husqvarna for at least 5 years. Can't remember him saying that it had ever broken down, but it wasn't a cheap machine.

    He fitted it himself (wire buried around the edge of the lawn to stop the machine from wandering off into the wild blue yonder) and it took him and his son most of the day. I'm assuming that OP will have to include the cost of setting up in her costings.

    Will also have to factor in the cost of an external power source, if one doesn't already exist.

    Is it any good? Well, put it this way - he still goes over the lawn with a conventional mower from time to time in the main growing season.

    Would a friendly neighbour (or two) not be willing to help out?
    • retiredandskint
    • By retiredandskint 7th Apr 18, 2:12 PM
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    retiredandskint
    • #7
    • 7th Apr 18, 2:12 PM
    • #7
    • 7th Apr 18, 2:12 PM
    Thanks Silvertabby I'm not sure how I thought robot worked but didn't think about the setup.

    Neighbour has offered the services of her 17 year old son but I don't like asking for help. Stupid, I know, but I hate being dependent or relying on others.

    I think I need to give this some thought. It just seemed a robot mower would be ideal.
    • DaftyDuck
    • By DaftyDuck 7th Apr 18, 2:52 PM
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    DaftyDuck
    • #8
    • 7th Apr 18, 2:52 PM
    • #8
    • 7th Apr 18, 2:52 PM
    Leaving my enthusiasm for gardening aside, making use of a willing 17 year-old might be of more rounded use. If he is half-willing, the cost of a robot lawn mower goes a long way towards driving lessons and a Sony Walkman (I assume them to still be the desired item )

    A willing teen can water hanging baskets, weed a flowerbed, even wash a window. Oh, and not all teens are mercenary to the core; a few like to help out...
    • retiredandskint
    • By retiredandskint 7th Apr 18, 3:00 PM
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    retiredandskint
    • #9
    • 7th Apr 18, 3:00 PM
    • #9
    • 7th Apr 18, 3:00 PM
    You're right Daffy duck and to be fair he cleared and removed all the soil from my raised veg beds last year when I couldn't cope with them.
    • Savvy_Sue
    • By Savvy_Sue 7th Apr 18, 3:27 PM
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    Savvy_Sue
    I was going to suggest a gardener too: a willing 17 year old sounds ideal!

    My gardener cut the grass on Thursday for the first time, but she does so much more than that. She says she has two sorts of client: people without the time / inclination, and people without the ability.

    Paying someone for a service isn't being dependent or reliant on them. It's a mutually beneficial relationship.
    Still knitting!
    Completed: 1 adult cardigan, 3 baby jumpers, 3 shawls, 1 sweat band, 3 pairs baby bootees,
    1 Wise Man Knitivity figure + 1 sheep, 2 pairs socks, 2 hats 2 balaclavas for seamen, 1 balaclava for myself ...
    Current projects: Poppies, mohair cardigan pattern arrived and going strong!
    • fishybusiness
    • By fishybusiness 9th Apr 18, 5:19 PM
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    fishybusiness
    I have two customers with willing robots, both Husqvarna's.

    Cut is ok, nothing to write home about, keeps the grass looking tidy.

    Edges will need trimming now and then as the robot follows a sunken wire, which accounts for the width of the robot body, they can't get right to the edge.

    Wet bumpy gardens seem to cause problems, they can slide and get stuck - they send out a distress signal to a mobile phone.

    I've been told all terrain wheels can be fitted to prevent this.

    They have 'nickability', lock them up at night!
    • retiredandskint
    • By retiredandskint 9th Apr 18, 5:50 PM
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    retiredandskint
    Thanks Fishybusiness our lawn is of the rough and bumpy variety, it was one of the jobs Mr Retired was planning to do but became ill before he could do it.

    Getting all this feedback has been brilliant and think I need to go back to the drawing board.
    • Savvy_Sue
    • By Savvy_Sue 9th Apr 18, 6:17 PM
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    Savvy_Sue
    I think the other thing to say about building mutually beneficial relationships is that it's good for you, and therefore for your DH. He may be past worrying about how much you're having to do for him, and how much you're having to do that he would have done if he could, but honestly, you need help (and if you don't know, you will in time).

    Of course, I know this is a moneysaving site, and you may not be in a position to throw money at this and any other problem like it, but I would, honestly, consider doing so if you can.

    It will be good for you if other people are coming to the house, having a quick chat before getting on with whatever it is they're doing, it will be another human being to talk to and to check you are OK. It will be good if your DH is accustomed to seeing other people from time to time, even if he has no idea who they are or what they're doing.

    And everything you get someone else to do is one less thing for you to have to do, and to worry about.
    Still knitting!
    Completed: 1 adult cardigan, 3 baby jumpers, 3 shawls, 1 sweat band, 3 pairs baby bootees,
    1 Wise Man Knitivity figure + 1 sheep, 2 pairs socks, 2 hats 2 balaclavas for seamen, 1 balaclava for myself ...
    Current projects: Poppies, mohair cardigan pattern arrived and going strong!
    • retiredandskint
    • By retiredandskint 9th Apr 18, 6:27 PM
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    retiredandskint
    Thanks SavvySue we're not awash with money but not scrabbling for pennies either. We're both mortgage and debt free so that helps. I have a carer that comes in for six hours one day a week but other than that have very little contact with the outside world.

    I think you're right about getting outside help and will ask around. It'd be nice to have someone to talk to occasionally.
    • Kim kim
    • By Kim kim 9th Apr 18, 6:31 PM
    • 2,281 Posts
    • 3,378 Thanks
    Kim kim
    I have a man who comes and mows the grass front and back, he strims it too. He loads it all into the brown garden bin. He charges 25, he does a lovely job. He comes every 4 weeks ish over the growing months.
    He also cuts the hedges as an extra.
    • cranford
    • By cranford 12th Apr 18, 7:26 PM
    • 261 Posts
    • 124 Thanks
    cranford
    Earlier this year I developed a athritic hip and now can only walk if I hold on to something so I figured out that if I replace my hover mower with a wheeled variety I should still be able to cut the lawns. I can push a wheel chair for a while so a few weeks ago I bought a cordless Worx mower and strimmer dual pack from Argos. So now I have cut the lawns twice. The small one is 45 sq metres and the second cut took me 6 mins and 3 mins to strim. The larger one 70 sq metres took about 12 mins each, first I set the mower on the second lowest height and then on the lowest for the second cut.
    Just as well its takes a short time as the batteries last no more than 15 mins. There are two of them and both are needed and take two hours to charge. The strimmer uses the same battery and its the first strimmer I have had that so far the line has not broke. If it does you just turn it off and back on again and it self feeds.
    Needless to say I am well please as its lightweight and easy to push and can I mow when the weather is ok rather than when somebody comes.
    I have bough a second set of batteries just in case which I got for 60 but at the time of writing Argos have reduce the price down from 199 to 166.

    I hope this helps.
    • retiredandskint
    • By retiredandskint 12th Apr 18, 8:07 PM
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    retiredandskint
    That's a big help. Thank you.
    • Savvy_Sue
    • By Savvy_Sue 13th Apr 18, 12:02 AM
    • 38,886 Posts
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    Savvy_Sue
    In your particular circumstances, I would try to find out what support there is for you as a carer, please ... your GP surgery should be able to help if a local Google doesn't. Some local authorities have a Care and Repair service which while it may not cover regular jobs like gardening will give access to 'trusted tradesmen'.
    Still knitting!
    Completed: 1 adult cardigan, 3 baby jumpers, 3 shawls, 1 sweat band, 3 pairs baby bootees,
    1 Wise Man Knitivity figure + 1 sheep, 2 pairs socks, 2 hats 2 balaclavas for seamen, 1 balaclava for myself ...
    Current projects: Poppies, mohair cardigan pattern arrived and going strong!
    • retiredandskint
    • By retiredandskint 13th Apr 18, 8:03 AM
    • 722 Posts
    • 4,537 Thanks
    retiredandskint
    In your particular circumstances, I would try to find out what support there is for you as a carer, please ... your GP surgery should be able to help if a local Google doesn't. Some local authorities have a Care and Repair service which while it may not cover regular jobs like gardening will give access to 'trusted tradesmen'.
    Originally posted by Savvy_Sue
    Up until recently I've copied but I've just started getting help and have a carer that comes in for six hours one day a week. I'm decluttering the house to make it easy to clean and do online food shopping to try and make things easier for me.

    All our children live a fair distance away so they can't just pop in but do what they can when they visit. It's the regular 'big' jobs , like the garden, which are the problem.

    I'm going to have a chat with my neighbour's son and see what can be arranged.

    Thank you all for your input in this.

    Forgot to add:. Our council does operate a an odd job man service for a small fee.
    Last edited by retiredandskint; 13-04-2018 at 8:05 AM. Reason: Addition
    • frugalmacdugal
    • By frugalmacdugal 13th Apr 18, 8:14 AM
    • 6,294 Posts
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    frugalmacdugal
    Hi,

    give the lad next door first chance, at 17 he will be glad of a 1 or 2, you're going to have to pay somebody anyway, and if you got somebody else in he might feel a bit peeved and think that you weren't happy with his previous work.
    Y'all take care now.
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