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    • Addiscomber
    • By Addiscomber 6th Apr 18, 11:07 AM
    • 974Posts
    • 1,196Thanks
    Addiscomber
    Holiday accommodation that accepts cats
    • #1
    • 6th Apr 18, 11:07 AM
    Holiday accommodation that accepts cats 6th Apr 18 at 11:07 AM
    My son refuses to contemplate putting our cat into a cattery while we go on holiday. Son has medical issues so we are very reluctant to go away and leave him to look after the cat.

    We have found self-catering accommodation that accept cats (and I am going to ask them what they expect of the cats/owners) but I wondered if anyone here has had any experience of such accommodation? I can't see it being a very relaxing experience if you have to worry about the cat possibly scratching something.
Page 1
    • Spendless
    • By Spendless 8th Apr 18, 3:44 PM
    • 20,315 Posts
    • 33,733 Thanks
    Spendless
    • #2
    • 8th Apr 18, 3:44 PM
    • #2
    • 8th Apr 18, 3:44 PM
    How old is son? Are you taking him on holiday with you? I'm not sure from your post.

    If he's staying behind, can't you just tell him you're taking the cat with you and drop it off at the cattery en-route?
    • Marmaduke123
    • By Marmaduke123 8th Apr 18, 4:30 PM
    • 444 Posts
    • 414 Thanks
    Marmaduke123
    • #3
    • 8th Apr 18, 4:30 PM
    • #3
    • 8th Apr 18, 4:30 PM
    If your son is going with you consider leaving the cat at home with a neighbour coming in to feed it, or use one of the pet visiting companies.

    If he's staying at home I'm a bit confused that you trust him to look after himself but not the cat! Could a neighbour keep an eye out for the cat

    I wouldn't let your son dictate what happens
    • winspiration
    • By winspiration 8th Apr 18, 4:59 PM
    • 233 Posts
    • 400 Thanks
    winspiration
    • #4
    • 8th Apr 18, 4:59 PM
    • #4
    • 8th Apr 18, 4:59 PM
    I'm sure that the cat would much prefer to stay in familiar surroundings with someone coming into feed it. I've used a pet visiting company before - they charged for a half hour visit & were happy to water plants / pull curtains etc in that time as well as feed the cat.
    • TBagpuss
    • By TBagpuss 9th Apr 18, 5:02 PM
    • 6,791 Posts
    • 8,889 Thanks
    TBagpuss
    • #5
    • 9th Apr 18, 5:02 PM
    • #5
    • 9th Apr 18, 5:02 PM
    I agree. Having a cat sitter come in to feed the cat, so cat gets to remain in their familiar surroundings is likely to be the lest stressful option for both you and for the cat.

    I think the issues with taking the cat with you would be
    - how well does the cat travel? And how far away is the holiday let?
    - IS the cat usually an outdoor cat? If so, how will they cope with being indoors, or are you going to allow them outside and risk them getting lost?
    - Is the cat used to travelling? I had a cat who was fine with it, as long as I was there, but a lot of cats are not happy, and stressed cats often express it by peeing. I would imagine that this might be a particular issue in rented accommodation where there have been other animals staying, and the cat may feel the need to mark it's territory.
    - Will you be able to relax and enjoy your holiday of you are stressed about making sure that the cat doesn't damage anything?
    - Is your cat used to using a litter tray? If so, make sure you take plenty of the correct kind of litter.

    I think calling the holiday let and finding out what is available and what their expectations are is a sensible first step.

    Think about things like how you are going to manage litter trays - these are quite bulky to transport, and you would need to know what arrangements there are for bins at the holiday let and what you are allowed to put in them.

    if you do decide to take the cat, the I would suggest that you make sure you take a couple of boxes and some towels / blankets. Put these in the cats normal sleeping places a week before you go, so the cat can use them. That way, when you get to the holiday let you can provide the cat with a couple of places that smell safe and familiar to him.

    I never took my travelling cat to rented accommodation, it was only visiting family. However, what I would do was to go to whichever room I was going to be sleeping in, put a worn t-shirt or something of mine on the bed to mark it as my/our place. I would then let cat out of his carrier in that room, with me there, and let him explore that room.

    Step 2 would be setting up, and showing him, the litter tray. I had one of the litter trays with a cover on it - very bulky to transport because he could go right inside, he felt safe using it (also less risk of spilled litter!).


    Step 3, setting out, and showing him, his food and water.

    After steps 2 & 3 i would usually go back to my room, and he would normally follow, which helped him to map out where it was.

    I think it worked because he was very much a one person cat, and because I took him with me when I spent time with family several times when he was still young, so he was used to it.

    However, I wouldn't take a cat to a holiday property myself,I'd find it too stressful and would also have the worry that if he did get out and get lost, there would be no-one familiar for him to come back to. At last if you are visiting family or friends you'd be able to ask them to carry on putting food out, and look after him till you could go back and get him, when he showed up!

    I have found that paying a sitter to come and feed a cat at home is no more expensive than using a cattery, and whil the cat will miss you, it will probably be less stressful than a cattery.

    If your son is not going on the holiday with you, why not get a sitter to come feed and check on the cat, and your son can also play with the cat and give him company. (or if your son doesn't live with you but lives locally, he can come visit the cat if he is worried about it)
    • Oddjob
    • By Oddjob 15th Apr 18, 11:22 PM
    • 450 Posts
    • 134 Thanks
    Oddjob
    • #6
    • 15th Apr 18, 11:22 PM
    • #6
    • 15th Apr 18, 11:22 PM
    If your son is going with you, would you be happy to have a house/pet sitter (who has been police checked) to house/pet sit for you?
    I work for an agency, once you have paid a joining fee, you get the sitter for free. They use your accommodation as a holiday and look after the pet at the same time, a free exchange if you like.
    I have stayed at houses and looked after dogs and cats.
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