Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@. Skimlinks & other affiliated links are turned on

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • MrBrindle
    • By MrBrindle 5th Apr 18, 11:06 AM
    • 122Posts
    • 43Thanks
    MrBrindle
    Full / partial integral garage conversion
    • #1
    • 5th Apr 18, 11:06 AM
    Full / partial integral garage conversion 5th Apr 18 at 11:06 AM
    Just looking for advice now how to proceed with an integral garage conversion. The house is a 2005 build. Many houses on the estate have done something similar.

    The garage is fully insulated on the outer wall, however I'm not sure what damp proof course is underneath the floor, if any. It currently houses the boiler and washing machine.

    We are either thinking of doing a full conversion, with windows in place of the door, or doing half the garage to use as storage, leaving the front as storage for gardening stuff and bikes etc.

    There is a fire door leading from the kitchen into the garage. With either way of doing it, can we remove the fire door so it's just a walk in room after it's done?

    We are planning on getting building regs/control involved so it's done properly without any issue cropping up if we sell in the future.
Page 1
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 5th Apr 18, 11:16 AM
    • 25,555 Posts
    • 69,374 Thanks
    Doozergirl
    • #2
    • 5th Apr 18, 11:16 AM
    • #2
    • 5th Apr 18, 11:16 AM
    It's quite simple stuff.

    How many parking spaces do you have, excluding the garage? Some new builds don't have the permitted development rights to convert the garage as it counts as one of the required parking spaces. If you have enough parking, or room to create more, it shouldn't be an issue but it might be worth contacting the planning department just to check that you have full 'permitted development rights'.

    A new damp proof membrane will be laid on the floor before the insulation, the actual building will have a damp proof course already.

    A garage conversion is a pretty simple job. You can remove the fire door when you're finished as long as your house is two storeys, not three.

    Have a look at your neighbours' conversions and see how different builders have approached the brickwork. By far the best way is to 'tooth out' the bricks at the side of the garage door opening and incorporate the new brickwork into the existing. It makes the conversion look more original. Lots of builders just brick up the hole on the cheap. A good brick match is imperative.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • MrBrindle
    • By MrBrindle 5th Apr 18, 11:43 AM
    • 122 Posts
    • 43 Thanks
    MrBrindle
    • #3
    • 5th Apr 18, 11:43 AM
    • #3
    • 5th Apr 18, 11:43 AM
    It's quite simple stuff.

    How many parking spaces do you have, excluding the garage? Some new builds don't have the permitted development rights to convert the garage as it counts as one of the required parking spaces. If you have enough parking, or room to create more, it shouldn't be an issue but it might be worth contacting the planning department just to check that you have full 'permitted development rights'.

    A new damp proof membrane will be laid on the floor before the insulation, the actual building will have a damp proof course already.

    A garage conversion is a pretty simple job. You can remove the fire door when you're finished as long as your house is two storeys, not three.

    Have a look at your neighbours' conversions and see how different builders have approached the brickwork. By far the best way is to 'tooth out' the bricks at the side of the garage door opening and incorporate the new brickwork into the existing. It makes the conversion look more original. Lots of builders just brick up the hole on the cheap. A good brick match is imperative.
    Originally posted by Doozergirl
    Hi Doozergirl, thanks for the advice again! You probably think I'm a bit daft thinking of converting the garage after my thoughts on the house in other thread!

    We have space for 2 cars outside at the moment, we are on the end of a shared driveaway, but with the possibility of creating another one if we flatten some shrubs in front of the house. Other houses on the estate have done something similar.

    One house two houses up as just put a full width window in and used what I imagine a wooden frame and upvc fascias underneath. Not the prettiest, but does the job.

    However you've got me thinking now in regards to the permitted developments rights and permission! Maybe I'll speak to neighbours first to see how they've gone about it.
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 5th Apr 18, 11:50 AM
    • 25,555 Posts
    • 69,374 Thanks
    Doozergirl
    • #4
    • 5th Apr 18, 11:50 AM
    • #4
    • 5th Apr 18, 11:50 AM
    My main life experience is building and mental health . I don't think you're daft. It's great that you're trying to settle already and even though you said you weren't motivated to get work done, it only takes one small step at a time. Taking ownership and making it yours does help.

    If your neighbours have all done it and you have some spare space it does sound like it's probably permitted development. Even planning isn't a major problem, just time and a bit of expense.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • EachPenny
    • By EachPenny 5th Apr 18, 1:53 PM
    • 6,097 Posts
    • 16,025 Thanks
    EachPenny
    • #5
    • 5th Apr 18, 1:53 PM
    • #5
    • 5th Apr 18, 1:53 PM
    However you've got me thinking now in regards to the permitted developments rights and permission! Maybe I'll speak to neighbours first to see how they've gone about it.
    Originally posted by MrBrindle
    You really ought to check with the Council before going too far with your plans. Speaking to the neighbours might just give you the incorrect assumptions they made in the same situation - although if they tell you PD rights have been removed it would be useful information.

    You should also check to see if there are any covenants (from the deeds) or other planning restrictions (from the planning consent) restricting what you can do. Converting garden into car parking space is also restricted in many cases - adding an extra parking space may throw up more challenges than the garage conversion itself.
    "In the future, everyone will be rich for 15 minutes"
    • MrBrindle
    • By MrBrindle 5th Apr 18, 2:46 PM
    • 122 Posts
    • 43 Thanks
    MrBrindle
    • #6
    • 5th Apr 18, 2:46 PM
    • #6
    • 5th Apr 18, 2:46 PM
    You really ought to check with the Council before going too far with your plans. Speaking to the neighbours might just give you the incorrect assumptions they made in the same situation - although if they tell you PD rights have been removed it would be useful information.

    You should also check to see if there are any covenants (from the deeds) or other planning restrictions (from the planning consent) restricting what you can do. Converting garden into car parking space is also restricted in many cases - adding an extra parking space may throw up more challenges than the garage conversion itself.
    Originally posted by EachPenny
    Thanks for the advice.

    Should we just go ahead and do the partial conversion anyway then, and if we do decide to sell, we can just take it out? We really want to do something with the garage as I don't see the point of having such a space myself, but then if it's a flat out no from the council we'll be on their radar!
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 5th Apr 18, 3:14 PM
    • 25,555 Posts
    • 69,374 Thanks
    Doozergirl
    • #7
    • 5th Apr 18, 3:14 PM
    • #7
    • 5th Apr 18, 3:14 PM
    Thanks for the advice.

    Should we just go ahead and do the partial conversion anyway then, and if we do decide to sell, we can just take it out? We really want to do something with the garage as I don't see the point of having such a space myself, but then if it's a flat out no from the council we'll be on their radar!
    Originally posted by MrBrindle
    It is nothing to worry about. You just need to check with them. It should be the matter of an email. Then you'll have a reply, then you can think about the next stage. Do that for us and we'll help you move forward.

    Our aim here is to have a proper conversion that adds value to your home. Let's stick with that as the focus before even considering doing it the wrong way.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • EachPenny
    • By EachPenny 5th Apr 18, 4:14 PM
    • 6,097 Posts
    • 16,025 Thanks
    EachPenny
    • #8
    • 5th Apr 18, 4:14 PM
    • #8
    • 5th Apr 18, 4:14 PM
    It is nothing to worry about. You just need to check with them. It should be the matter of an email. Then you'll have a reply, then you can think about the next stage. Do that for us and we'll help you move forward.

    Our aim here is to have a proper conversion that adds value to your home. Let's stick with that as the focus before even considering doing it the wrong way.
    Originally posted by Doozergirl
    100% agree, it is just a case of identifying the things you need to check and tick them off the list.
    "In the future, everyone will be rich for 15 minutes"
    • MrBrindle
    • By MrBrindle 6th Apr 18, 4:17 PM
    • 122 Posts
    • 43 Thanks
    MrBrindle
    • #9
    • 6th Apr 18, 4:17 PM
    • #9
    • 6th Apr 18, 4:17 PM
    The council have confirmed we don't need planning permission for the garage conversion, but do require building regs. I imagine this makes things simpler?

    How does building regs work? Do we have to pay for an application or something?

    My friend who will be doing the works (he's actually building two houses himself) said don't bother with building regs! I don't think we'll take his advice, as we want the job done properly.
    • ashe
    • By ashe 6th Apr 18, 5:55 PM
    • 544 Posts
    • 401 Thanks
    ashe
    This is a thread by a friend of mine that did a great job with this garage conversion, building regs may have changed since then so be aware of that but he documents every step and makes his costings available, again few years ago so add a few % but its a very useful indicator.

    https://www.avforums.com/threads/integral-garage-conversion.1481801/

    It looks a lot better now than it does in the thread with the decals he originally had up. Proper tip top job he did of the whole thing on a shoestring budget.

    Take the building regs option. If you sell, it will come up in the survey and people will chance you to knock cash off for the 'risk' and the room will likely be less safe/insulated as a result.
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 6th Apr 18, 6:59 PM
    • 25,555 Posts
    • 69,374 Thanks
    Doozergirl
    The council have confirmed we don't need planning permission for the garage conversion, but do require building regs. I imagine this makes things simpler?

    How does building regs work? Do we have to pay for an application or something?

    My friend who will be doing the works (he's actually building two houses himself) said don't bother with building regs! I don't think we'll take his advice, as we want the job done properly.
    Originally posted by MrBrindle
    Yes, there is a fee.

    Oh dear to your friend .

    It will come up when you sell and you do want the best for yourselves anyway.

    There are two options. One is fullplans where you get an architect (or technician) to draw up the specification and submit plans to be approved. The other is Building Notice where you have no plans but site inspections to check that things are progressing correctly.

    Your choice. Has your friend given you a price? Be careful of using friends, especially if they want to do it on the cheap. They might think they're doing you a favour but integrity is everything.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • EachPenny
    • By EachPenny 6th Apr 18, 7:52 PM
    • 6,097 Posts
    • 16,025 Thanks
    EachPenny
    Your choice. Has your friend given you a price? Be careful of using friends, especially if they want to do it on the cheap. They might think they're doing you a favour but integrity is everything.
    Originally posted by Doozergirl
    I agree. Someone who starts off a job with "don't bother with building regs" makes me wonder how they will finish the job.
    "In the future, everyone will be rich for 15 minutes"
    • troffasky
    • By troffasky 14th Apr 18, 10:33 AM
    • 73 Posts
    • 45 Thanks
    troffasky
    My friend who will be doing the works (he's actually building two houses himself) said don't bother with building regs! I don't think we'll take his advice, as we want the job done properly.
    Originally posted by MrBrindle
    I'm not a builder, but from the few Approved Documents [ https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/approved-documents ] I've read, building regulations seem to this layman to be a "floor" below which one wouldn't want to go.

    Read this:

    https://www.planningportal.co.uk/info/200187/your_responsibilities/38/building_regulations

    before deciding whether to believe anyone who tells you that you don't need to follow them.

    Lurk over in House Buying, Renting and Selling and you will see umpteen threads where lack of building control signoff has complicated a property transaction.
    • MrBrindle
    • By MrBrindle 20th Apr 18, 11:53 PM
    • 122 Posts
    • 43 Thanks
    MrBrindle
    Just jumping back on this as we haven't decided on what to do yet.

    Due to financial reasons, we are now looking at a partial garage conversion as means of adding and extra utility area.

    My questions are, will building regs pass a partial garage conversion? The room will just be a 3x3metre room off the kitchen, but we are hoping to take the fire door off and put a baby gate so the dogs can have their own little area in the house. We will then put the fire door in the stud wall which divides the garage.

    Is this ok to do? And is it something that we should notify our house insurers of?

    Thanks
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 21st Apr 18, 4:06 AM
    • 25,555 Posts
    • 69,374 Thanks
    Doozergirl
    They'll pass it if it complies. I'm not sure it saves much money as you're introducing a new wall anyway so your wall area to cover is nearly the same as the full garage and the floor isn't going to be much different. The new wall needs to be of sturdy construction to maintain the firebreak (maybe, arguably the remainder may not hold a car anymore?) and insulated envelope (definitely).

    Have you taken advice on costs?
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

4,327Posts Today

8,158Users online

Martin's Twitter
  • Ta ta... for now. This August, as I try and do every few yrs, I'm lucky enough to be taking a sabbatical. No work,? https://t.co/Xx4R3eLhFG

  • RT @lethalbrignull: @MartinSLewis I've been sitting here for a good while trying to decide my answer to this, feeling grateful for living i?

  • Early days but currently it's exactly 50 50 in liberality v democracy, with younger people more liberal, older more? https://t.co/YwJr4izuIj

  • Follow Martin