Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@.

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • JustAnotherSaver
    • By JustAnotherSaver 14th Mar 18, 11:12 PM
    • 2,956Posts
    • 491Thanks
    JustAnotherSaver
    timer for the slow cooker?
    • #1
    • 14th Mar 18, 11:12 PM
    timer for the slow cooker? 14th Mar 18 at 11:12 PM
    I did a forum search to see where most of the food talk seems to be and that's how i ended up in this forum with this question. Point me in the right direction if it's better suited to another forum.

    Do any of you use timers on your slow cookers? I ask because i'm having to warm the food up in the microwave with ours.

    My wife leaves the house later than i do so if it's a slow cooker meal then she'll put it on around 7:30am. By the time we get home anything between 6pm-7pm it's actually cold (or lukewarm at the very best).

    I'd obviously like it to come to its end right as we're getting through the front door (or as close to obviously).
    Just don't know if these things are ok with timers or not? Do any of you use timers on them? If so then any old timer?

Page 1
    • JackieO
    • By JackieO 15th Mar 18, 12:02 AM
    • 15,890 Posts
    • 134,691 Thanks
    JackieO
    • #2
    • 15th Mar 18, 12:02 AM
    • #2
    • 15th Mar 18, 12:02 AM
    If its been on all that time it should be well cooked and piping hot ,sounds like you need to invest in a new SC I cook a chicken overnight in my SC and put it on low before bedtime and its cooked and pretty hot and ready to eat in the morning 8-9 hours later.I never use a timer I just chuck it in and set it to low and leave it until it looks cooked through and done ,normally about 7-8 hours
    Quot Libros,Quam Breve Tempus. 2018
    Running total for four months food only shopping =126.24.Freezer stuff slowly going down at last May totals 31.11 freezer and tinned cupboards are going down nicely
    • pamsdish
    • By pamsdish 15th Mar 18, 8:21 AM
    • 890 Posts
    • 5,026 Thanks
    pamsdish
    • #3
    • 15th Mar 18, 8:21 AM
    • #3
    • 15th Mar 18, 8:21 AM
    I use a timer, every 3 days, I cook chicken thighs for my dog, throw them frozen in s.c. in the morning, turn s.c. to low, my plug in timer is set to come on at midnight until 6 am, they defrost during the day, by the time I wish to remove them they have cooled enough to handle, and perfectly cooked.
    JUST REMEMBER TO TURN TO OFF.
    When I wish to use it for myself I just use the override on the side of timer, they are 3ish in Wilkos,
    I agree with JackieO sounds like a problem with your sc. is the meal cooked, you say warm up so suggests it is but gone cool, are you already using a timer and it`s switching off too early ?, if so reset it for 6.30 pm, food keeps quite hot for some time, residual heat.
    JAN200=107FEB200=40,MARCH175=50
    APRIL200=35
    May
    200-20=180,-16=164,-5=159,-32=127,-11=116.
    • Pollycat
    • By Pollycat 15th Mar 18, 8:26 AM
    • 20,039 Posts
    • 53,760 Thanks
    Pollycat
    • #4
    • 15th Mar 18, 8:26 AM
    • #4
    • 15th Mar 18, 8:26 AM
    If its been on all that time it should be well cooked and piping hot ,sounds like you need to invest in a new SC I cook a chicken overnight in my SC and put it on low before bedtime and its cooked and pretty hot and ready to eat in the morning 8-9 hours later.I never use a timer I just chuck it in and set it to low and leave it until it looks cooked through and done ,normally about 7-8 hours
    Originally posted by JackieO
    I think the same as JackieO

    What sort of slow cooker do you have?
    What settings does it have?

    Mine are both basic - one has high, low, medium, the other has high, low and warm.
    The food is hot in both - and stays that way hours after I switch it off.

    It sounds as if yours is cooking for a set time period then switching off, allowing the food to go cold.
    Does it have an in-built timer that is being set unaware to you and that is why the food is cold when you get home?
    If not, it sounds like it's not working properly.
    Has it always functioned like this?
    • buildersdaughter
    • By buildersdaughter 15th Mar 18, 9:34 AM
    • 163 Posts
    • 421 Thanks
    buildersdaughter
    • #5
    • 15th Mar 18, 9:34 AM
    • #5
    • 15th Mar 18, 9:34 AM
    A word of caution. Many of us use older slow cookers (my own is 40 years old) but the newer ones seem to operate at higher temperatures. Now there is just 2 of us at home, I bought a small one and was shocked at how quickly it cooked. Anything in there for 10-11 hours would be done to a frazzle ( I have watched my small slow cooker, set on low, bubble energetically)
    BUT the problem about setting it on a timer, so it cooks for a shorter time, may be bacteria multiplying. It is safe if you are putting everything in cold, setting the timer a few hours later - the food will be quite safe coming up to room temperature before cooking.
    It is not safe if you are starting everything off cooking, then allowing it to sit for a few hours at room temp. before the cooking starts.

    I suggest that you try it when at home so you can observe it. Then certainly consider a timer - I have done this - but only with food you are putting in cold.
    Otherwise, even if it has cooked and cooled down, at least you only have to microwave for a few minutes rather than cook from scratch.

    Let us know how you get on please
    • Pollycat
    • By Pollycat 15th Mar 18, 9:45 AM
    • 20,039 Posts
    • 53,760 Thanks
    Pollycat
    • #6
    • 15th Mar 18, 9:45 AM
    • #6
    • 15th Mar 18, 9:45 AM
    A word of caution. Many of us use older slow cookers (my own is 40 years old) but the newer ones seem to operate at higher temperatures. Now there is just 2 of us at home, I bought a small one and was shocked at how quickly it cooked. Anything in there for 10-11 hours would be done to a frazzle ( I have watched my small slow cooker, set on low, bubble energetically)
    BUT the problem about setting it on a timer, so it cooks for a shorter time, may be bacteria multiplying. It is safe if you are putting everything in cold, setting the timer a few hours later - the food will be quite safe coming up to room temperature before cooking.
    It is not safe if you are starting everything off cooking, then allowing it to sit for a few hours at room temp. before the cooking starts.

    I suggest that you try it when at home so you can observe it. Then certainly consider a timer - I have done this - but only with food you are putting in cold.
    Otherwise, even if it has cooked and cooled down, at least you only have to microwave for a few minutes rather than cook from scratch.

    Let us know how you get on please
    Originally posted by buildersdaughter
    buildersdaughter
    I agree.
    My ex MIL gifted us a Prestige 'Crock pot' when they first came out almost 45 years ago.
    A sales rep gave it to her.
    I loved it!
    It was like this and was used regularly until the base failed. I still have the pot and look on car boots and in charity shops and occasionally on ebay for a replacement base.

    Neither of my 2 - small round Cookworks or large oval Morphy Richards - cook anywhere near as well - or for as long.
    Last edited by Pollycat; 15-03-2018 at 11:22 AM.
    • pamsdish
    • By pamsdish 15th Mar 18, 12:01 PM
    • 890 Posts
    • 5,026 Thanks
    pamsdish
    • #7
    • 15th Mar 18, 12:01 PM
    • #7
    • 15th Mar 18, 12:01 PM
    I have a small crockpot, brand name, off, low, high, and a larger one, low, med, high, from Aldi, the smaller crockpot gets very hot on low and bubbles, the bigger one I think low is just a keep warm function, no good for cooking, we still don`t know if food is cooked or not, I think that will answer a lot of our questions.
    JAN200=107FEB200=40,MARCH175=50
    APRIL200=35
    May
    200-20=180,-16=164,-5=159,-32=127,-11=116.
    • TensandUnits
    • By TensandUnits 15th Mar 18, 3:58 PM
    • 43 Posts
    • 88 Thanks
    TensandUnits
    • #8
    • 15th Mar 18, 3:58 PM
    • #8
    • 15th Mar 18, 3:58 PM
    As above, I can't see why it would switch itself off like that. Ours goes on at about 9.30am and the meal is ready at about 6pm, but it would keep cooking slowly if we left it on till later.
    • gettingtheresometime
    • By gettingtheresometime 15th Mar 18, 4:21 PM
    • 3,609 Posts
    • 8,969 Thanks
    gettingtheresometime
    • #9
    • 15th Mar 18, 4:21 PM
    • #9
    • 15th Mar 18, 4:21 PM
    Got my slow cooker on today using a timer.


    Just a standard one with low, high & warm temperature settings.
    Lloyds OD / Natwest OD / PO CC / Wescott / Argos Card cleared thanks to the 1 debt v 100 day challenge


    Next on the list - JD Williams
    • Slinky
    • By Slinky 15th Mar 18, 5:19 PM
    • 5,196 Posts
    • 24,010 Thanks
    Slinky
    The only slow cookers I have ever had stay on at whatever temperature (low or high) until you turn them off. Sounds like your's has some sort of timer within it.
    • caronc
    • By caronc 15th Mar 18, 5:26 PM
    • 3,788 Posts
    • 24,336 Thanks
    caronc
    I think some of the digital sear & stew slow cookers have an auto shut off when the cooking time has elapsed.
    GC - Feb18 68/120, Mar 104/150, Apr 164/200, May 96/120
    GC YTD 2018- 487/710
    • YORKSHIRELASS
    • By YORKSHIRELASS 15th Mar 18, 6:38 PM
    • 4,558 Posts
    • 37,995 Thanks
    YORKSHIRELASS
    I would get rid of it and buy a new one - ours was 15 from T@sco for a big 3L one.

    Curry went in this morning at 8am, left on low all day, just eaten it now - piping hot and perfectly cooked.
    • JustAnotherSaver
    • By JustAnotherSaver 15th Mar 18, 9:39 PM
    • 2,956 Posts
    • 491 Thanks
    JustAnotherSaver
    Yes there's a timer with it. I don't actually use it myself, my wife does I just eat the contents

    Yes the food is cooked. It'll probably be easier if i find the make-model.

    Right, it's a Morphy Richards slow cooker & the model is 460005 https://www.amazon.co.uk/Morphy-Richards-Accents-460005-Digital/dp/B00J3R3YUE/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1521149896&sr=8-1&keywords=morphy+richards+460005 we got ours from Currys

    It's not that old, only about a year or two at the most & to be honest we don't use it a great deal. My wife doesn't really like slow cooker meals and i find the having to re-heat thing a bit annoying. I'd have more slow cooker meals if it was hot when i got home.

    • elsien
    • By elsien 15th Mar 18, 9:45 PM
    • 16,377 Posts
    • 41,413 Thanks
    elsien
    I use a timer with mine - one of those that you use to turn lamps on and off when you go on holiday. Mine is only a couple of years old but the only setting are low, high and auto. It doesn't turn itself off. If it's just meat it's ok but if there's veggies in and it's on all day then they're far too soggy by the time I get home.
    So I set the timer to come on lunchtimeish so it's cooked just right by the time I'm ready to eat.
    All shall be well, and all shall be well, and all manner of things shall be well.

    Pedant alert - it's could have, not could of.
    • buildersdaughter
    • By buildersdaughter 15th Mar 18, 9:59 PM
    • 163 Posts
    • 421 Thanks
    buildersdaughter
    I've had a look at it, and *think* the problem may be that your wife is following the instructions on timing (at 7.30am) and it is either switching off, or the 'keep warm' function isn't working.
    So it seems that you either can't be @rs*d and abandon it, or one of you tackles it over the weekends when you are around and can keep an eye on what it is doing.
    The manufacturers always want you to think it is simple, but like any piece of equipment, you need to get to know its quirks and limitations.
    You say that your wife doesn't much like slow cooker meals - that may mean she doesn't want to put the energy into sorting out best recipes and best ways to do things. Of course I don't want to comment on your domestic arrangements and division of labour, but chucking things in a slow cooker at 07.30 is taxing enough, and if you feel no enthusiasm, pretty hard to fiddle and get just right.
    Here is a recipe that you can assemble the night before, keep in the fridge and throw in the slow cooker in the morning:
    about 350g.!!stewing beef!cut in 2-inch chunks
    1!tablespoon!chili powder
    1!teaspoon!cumin
    1 teaspoon mixed herbs
    1!teaspoon!salt
    1/8!teaspoon!red cayenne pepper!or regular pepper (double this if you like it hot!)
    1/2!onion!diced
    1 15-oz!can!kidney beans drained and rinsed
    1 14-oz!can!diced tomatoes with juice

    The recipe says put on auto for 5-6 hours, I have put on auto and left it for 11 (with my old cooker) and it was fine. You might want to juggle with quantities, according to taste.

    This is another one that you can prepare the night before:
    I make this with a shoulder of lamb. The following quantities are for half a shoulder, which serves 2-3 !!!8211; or 4 with extra roast veges!

    Put the slow cooker on to heat on high

    Score the skin on the upper side of the joint into diamond shapes with a small sharp knife.
    Rub ras-al-hanouf into the skin all over the joint (about 2 tablesp. for half a shoulder)
    I don!!!8217;t use saffron at this point, I put it in the cous-cous, but you can add it if you want.

    Put into the slow cooker with the following, roughly chopped:
    A small chopped onion, 3 cloves garlic, 2 de-seeded chillies, a lemon.
    If you want to add some dried apricots, they will absorb the juices and taste lovely.
    Cook for several hours on low.

    Strain the juices & pour off the fat, use the remaining juice as part of the stock when making up the cous-cous.
    I usually keep the lemon and squeeze it onto the cous-cous or lamb when serving, the cooking gives it a lovely deep flavour.

    The meat will fall off the bone roughly !!!8211; this is not an elegant dish!

    Serve with cous-cous, roast veges and/or salad.

    I can only apologise for the ! that insert themselves, but honestly, am only willing to cut-and-paste, not type from scratch!
    Last edited by buildersdaughter; 15-03-2018 at 10:02 PM. Reason: addition
    • JustAnotherSaver
    • By JustAnotherSaver 15th Mar 18, 10:24 PM
    • 2,956 Posts
    • 491 Thanks
    JustAnotherSaver
    The keep warm thing - it depends on what your take of 'warm' is. I mean, at the end of the 2 hours (i think it is) keep warm function - the food is warmer than stone cold like it'd be if it came out of the fridge but it's not what i'd personally call warm.

    As for the 7:30 thing, all food is/was prepped the night before. Generally it was just chicken/beef casseroles. The morning would be just a case of turn it on.

    I do remember us having a lot of trouble early on with water content. We did fajitas in there & the taste & texture of the meat was really nice .....BUT there was just so much juice that it was dripping out of the wraps. We had to stop having them that way. That's drifting off topic anyway.

    IIRC the cooker goes on for an 8 hour cook as per the timer on the cooker itself. I'd need to look to see if this could be extended or not.
    Since putting it on at 7:30am leaves it cold for us coming back, i was wondering about one of those plug in timer delay things and have it come on at say 10am-11am by which time the 8hours will be up at 6pm-7pm and *should* be good temperature right for us walking through the door as we get home from work.

    • buildersdaughter
    • By buildersdaughter 16th Mar 18, 6:07 PM
    • 163 Posts
    • 421 Thanks
    buildersdaughter
    Yes, if you're not heating it up at 7am, then it's fine to set the timer for a few hours later. As for the fjita sauce - reduce the liquid content by boiling the juice away, or using thicker tomato sauce.
    • JustAnotherSaver
    • By JustAnotherSaver 16th Mar 18, 9:09 PM
    • 2,956 Posts
    • 491 Thanks
    JustAnotherSaver
    Since i posted it quite late last night i had the chance to speak to my wife about this today & asked since i found it has a 10 hour max on the low heat setting - why she sets it at 8 hours.

    She said it's because a) some of the recipes/guides state 8 hours for the cook and b) she doesn't want to burn it or c) make it all dry out.

    • TensandUnits
    • By TensandUnits 17th Mar 18, 9:57 AM
    • 43 Posts
    • 88 Thanks
    TensandUnits
    It's almost impossible to burn things in a slow cooker, or for them to dry out, so she shouldn't worry about that
    • Toomuchdebt
    • By Toomuchdebt 17th Mar 18, 10:48 AM
    • 1,840 Posts
    • 3,064 Thanks
    Toomuchdebt
    I agree...as we speak I have had a beef casserole in the slow cooker for 16 hours and it's fine.I've literally just added potatoes to it and will let it carry on until it's ready to eat.
    Debts Jan 2014 20,108.34

    Debts Feb 2018 6829.63

    EF #70 0/1000
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

2,526Posts Today

8,137Users online

Martin's Twitter
  • It's the start of mini MSE's half term. In order to be the best daddy possible, Im stopping work and going off line? https://t.co/kwjvtd75YU

  • RT @shellsince1982: @MartinSLewis thanx to your email I have just saved myself £222 by taking a SIM only deal for £7.50 a month and keeping?

  • Today's Friday twitter poll: An important question, building on yesterday's important discussions: Which is the best bit of the pizza...

  • Follow Martin