Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@.

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • victoriavictorious
    • By victoriavictorious 14th Mar 18, 4:33 PM
    • 200Posts
    • 284Thanks
    victoriavictorious
    Buyer having full structural survey....
    • #1
    • 14th Mar 18, 4:33 PM
    Buyer having full structural survey.... 14th Mar 18 at 4:33 PM
    ....
    Plenty of Homebuyer reports booked in the past, and that would have been fine, but never had a buyer book a full survey before! Just got the phone call - he sounded quite chirpy but said he'd be here for 3 HOURS!!! 3 HOURS?? The house isn't that big.
    It's a smallish, warm, cosy Victorian house which has never given us any problems since the day we bought it, but we have no safety certificates for electricty, gas or anything except building regs for something done yonks ago before we moved in.
    We've got old rattly single glazing, original sash windows - none of which open smoothly, moss on the roof (but no leaks) and he's bound to find damp, as they always do.....apart from that lot, everything seems ok and the house has been fine for us.
    Mentally I'm going round costing up everything I know he's going to find wrong, and the buyers are going to use to get the price down.
    I'm on 20K now and counting....
    Should I spike his coffee and get him drunk?
    Honestly I'm trying to make light of this but I'm *****ing myself!!
    Has anyone else been through this - and come out the other end with buyer (and at least some money) still intact?
Page 1
    • missprice
    • By missprice 14th Mar 18, 4:37 PM
    • 3,341 Posts
    • 106,395 Thanks
    missprice
    • #2
    • 14th Mar 18, 4:37 PM
    • #2
    • 14th Mar 18, 4:37 PM
    I think the usual comment is "its priced to reflect the work needed" or similar.
    Last survey I got took 3 hours for a 3 bed semi. It even mentioned the electric cable becoming visible from under the drive to the garage. True but It was about 6mm visible. And made no difference to the price paid.
    63 mortgage payments to go.

    Zero wins 2016 !!!128549;
    • victoriavictorious
    • By victoriavictorious 14th Mar 18, 4:39 PM
    • 200 Posts
    • 284 Thanks
    victoriavictorious
    • #3
    • 14th Mar 18, 4:39 PM
    • #3
    • 14th Mar 18, 4:39 PM
    I think the usual comment is "its priced to reflect the work needed" or similar.
    Last survey I got took 3 hours for a 3 bed semi. It even mentioned the electric cable becoming visible from under the drive to the garage. True but It was about 6mm visible. And made no difference to the price paid.
    Originally posted by missprice
    Thanks. Were you selling or buying it?
    • G_M
    • By G_M 14th Mar 18, 4:39 PM
    • 44,091 Posts
    • 52,230 Thanks
    G_M
    • #4
    • 14th Mar 18, 4:39 PM
    • #4
    • 14th Mar 18, 4:39 PM
    He'll see and document whatever he finds. If there are hidden defects in the property, he might spot them. If there are defects that are not hidden, the buyer probably already saw them.

    never given us any problems since the day we bought it,
    then nothing much to worry about!
    but we have no safety certificates for electricty, gas or anything
    there's no requirement for you to have them. If the gas and leccy are safe and working, that's what matters.
    except building regs for something done yonks ago before we moved in.
    well done

    We've got old rattly single glazing, original sash windows
    and the buyers must already know this
    - none of which open smoothly,
    if the buyers did a proper viewing, they'll already know this
    moss on the roof (but no leaks)
    adds charm. Plus the buyers must already know this
    and he's bound to find damp,
    Why? Is there damp?
    • AnotherJoe
    • By AnotherJoe 14th Mar 18, 4:40 PM
    • 9,413 Posts
    • 10,406 Thanks
    AnotherJoe
    • #5
    • 14th Mar 18, 4:40 PM
    • #5
    • 14th Mar 18, 4:40 PM
    You dont need any of those safety certificates. Good that you've got the building cert, have that ready.

    The survey will no doubt raise a whole host of additional things that its recommended the buyer waste spend money on - electrical, plumbing, asbestos, knotweed, puff adders.

    And will probably scare the bejeeesus out of your no doubt nervous FTB* who'll want a chunk of money off for expecting a Victorian house to be built to the same standards they imagine a modern newbuild is.

    Be prepared to remarket.


    * (alternative scenario, they are very canny, know there will be a whole host of "doesn't conform to modern standards BS and reckon 1500 on this survey will let them knock 15k off a gullible sellers price)
    • victoriavictorious
    • By victoriavictorious 14th Mar 18, 4:43 PM
    • 200 Posts
    • 284 Thanks
    victoriavictorious
    • #6
    • 14th Mar 18, 4:43 PM
    • #6
    • 14th Mar 18, 4:43 PM
    He'll see and document whatever he finds. If there are hidden defects in the property, he might spot them. If there are defects that are not hidden, the buyer probably already saw them.


    Why? Is there damp?
    Originally posted by G_M
    Not to my knowledge, but Ive never seen a report not mention it.
    • missprice
    • By missprice 14th Mar 18, 4:45 PM
    • 3,341 Posts
    • 106,395 Thanks
    missprice
    • #7
    • 14th Mar 18, 4:45 PM
    • #7
    • 14th Mar 18, 4:45 PM
    Thanks. Were you selling or buying it?
    Originally posted by victoriavictorious
    Buying, but I am not a numpty and I know when something is very serious in a survey. I am risk averse so houses that need under pinning or it's equal are not for me. New electrics /roof/replumb etc no problem.
    63 mortgage payments to go.

    Zero wins 2016 !!!128549;
    • victoriavictorious
    • By victoriavictorious 14th Mar 18, 4:55 PM
    • 200 Posts
    • 284 Thanks
    victoriavictorious
    • #8
    • 14th Mar 18, 4:55 PM
    • #8
    • 14th Mar 18, 4:55 PM
    Buying, but I am not a numpty and I know when something is very serious in a survey. I am risk averse so houses that need under pinning or it's equal are not for me. New electrics /roof/replumb etc no problem.
    Originally posted by missprice
    Trouble is they're inexperienced FTBs who tend to panic and don't always realise that surveyors have to cover their backs and it's their business to mention every jot and tittle.
    • missprice
    • By missprice 14th Mar 18, 5:00 PM
    • 3,341 Posts
    • 106,395 Thanks
    missprice
    • #9
    • 14th Mar 18, 5:00 PM
    • #9
    • 14th Mar 18, 5:00 PM
    Trouble is they're inexperienced FTBs who tend to panic and don't always realise that surveyors have to cover their backs and it's their business to mention every jot and tittle.
    Originally posted by victoriavictorious
    Fall back is, it's priced to take into account any repairs needed.
    Plus if it's obvious then they must have seen it in the viewing and should have offered accordingly.
    63 mortgage payments to go.

    Zero wins 2016 !!!128549;
    • victoriavictorious
    • By victoriavictorious 14th Mar 18, 5:40 PM
    • 200 Posts
    • 284 Thanks
    victoriavictorious
    Just wondering, is he likely to expect to take up carpets? Most of the rooms have fitted carpet/vinyl and whilst we're pretty sure there are no horrors lurking underneath, we don't want all the hassle and cost of having to re-lay flooring, especially if they end up pulling out.
    • shortcrust
    • By shortcrust 14th Mar 18, 5:55 PM
    • 1,898 Posts
    • 2,780 Thanks
    shortcrust
    Anything they could see when they viewed should already have been factored in to their offer (e.g. single glazed windows that don't open well). Anything they could have expected they should have already have factored in (e.g. damp in the cellar of a victorian building, original roof nearing end of life). Anything new and unexpected might give them grounds to negotiate, but I wouldn't easily be convinced to knock a few quid as a result of a survey unless it was a big deal, or of course unless I was desperate to sell.

    At the end of the day you can simply say 'no' if they try to beat the price down.
    • kittie
    • By kittie 14th Mar 18, 6:17 PM
    • 11,982 Posts
    • 74,952 Thanks
    kittie
    I will be having a full structural survey on my next property, simply because I am now widowed and always relied on my husband who was a structural engineer. I will want to know if it needs rewiring, if there is damp, if it needs a new boiler and so on. I do not want to be doing this purchase blind but at the same time am realistic and will be able to pick out the obvious things myself. Its called belt and braces and also forward planning for future expenditure
    • AnotherJoe
    • By AnotherJoe 14th Mar 18, 6:28 PM
    • 9,413 Posts
    • 10,406 Thanks
    AnotherJoe
    I don't believe a structural engineer will ccomment on heating (boiler) or electrics. .
    • kittie
    • By kittie 14th Mar 18, 6:34 PM
    • 11,982 Posts
    • 74,952 Thanks
    kittie
    I should think it would be included in the full survey, however I will ask beforehand. Any case my second visit will be with two friends, one of whom is a very experienced structural engineer, I just want them with me to pick out the obvious that I might miss. Its quite scary buying by myself. We never ever had a formal survey on any property, this will be the first time
    • Thrugelmir
    • By Thrugelmir 14th Mar 18, 6:44 PM
    • 58,476 Posts
    • 51,849 Thanks
    Thrugelmir
    Plus if it's obvious then they must have seen it in the viewing and should have offered accordingly.
    Originally posted by missprice
    Seen what? Would you buy a car for thousands of pounds without a mechanical inspection or warranty. May look shiny on the outside to the naked eye. However reality can often be very different.

    Sellers are known to be unscrupulous. Been there myself. Forced the Estate Agents to refund the surveyors costs. At the end of the day this is a business transaction.
    Financial disasters happen when the last person who can remember what went wrong last time has left the building.
    • missprice
    • By missprice 14th Mar 18, 8:02 PM
    • 3,341 Posts
    • 106,395 Thanks
    missprice
    Seen what? Would you buy a car for thousands of pounds without a mechanical inspection or warranty. May look shiny on the outside to the naked eye. However reality can often be very different.

    Sellers are known to be unscrupulous. Been there myself. Forced the Estate Agents to refund the surveyors costs. At the end of the day this is a business transaction.
    Originally posted by Thrugelmir
    Seen the obvious single glazed Windows, that rattle, seen the Moss on the roof.
    No one can see under plaster, inside walls, down plumbed in pipes.

    So a survey that states single glazed rattly Windows will cost x thousands, you say I priced to reflect that Windows need replacing.
    A survey that states whole front of building is falling down and needs rebuilt, yeah try get some money off.

    Eta yeah I would buy a shiny car, cos it's just thousands not tens of thousands,plus I don't expect to be living in the car. And I love shiny, but that's me.
    Last edited by missprice; 14-03-2018 at 8:05 PM.
    63 mortgage payments to go.

    Zero wins 2016 !!!128549;
    • Tom99
    • By Tom99 15th Mar 18, 3:06 AM
    • 2,069 Posts
    • 1,392 Thanks
    Tom99
    Let them wander round on their own, make them a cup of tea and when they have finished ask them if they found anything you should be worried about.
    They may say they can't discuss it with you but they may open up particularly if they have a question for you about something they have seen.
    • hannh
    • By hannh 15th Mar 18, 7:26 AM
    • 50 Posts
    • 194 Thanks
    hannh
    I was a nervous first time buyer who got a full survey done on a house that was built in early 1900s - the survey was not fun to read and a bit scary but we did our research, carefully figured out what sounded like back-covering and what sounded like an issue and still bought the house for the price we originally offered. So far so good, we have sorted what was needed and I love this house.
    Hope it goes well for you.
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

2,526Posts Today

8,137Users online

Martin's Twitter
  • It's the start of mini MSE's half term. In order to be the best daddy possible, Im stopping work and going off line? https://t.co/kwjvtd75YU

  • RT @shellsince1982: @MartinSLewis thanx to your email I have just saved myself £222 by taking a SIM only deal for £7.50 a month and keeping?

  • Today's Friday twitter poll: An important question, building on yesterday's important discussions: Which is the best bit of the pizza...

  • Follow Martin