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  • FIRST POST
    • eshroom
    • By eshroom 14th Mar 18, 1:18 PM
    • 115Posts
    • 15Thanks
    eshroom
    Underpinnin due to additional load
    • #1
    • 14th Mar 18, 1:18 PM
    Underpinnin due to additional load 14th Mar 18 at 1:18 PM
    Currently adding a floor to a flat roof building. A small section of wall requireds underpinning due to the additional load being added.

    Is this treated in the same was as underpinning due to subsidence by insurers and mortgage lenders?
Page 1
    • societys child
    • By societys child 14th Mar 18, 3:21 PM
    • 5,197 Posts
    • 5,734 Thanks
    societys child
    • #2
    • 14th Mar 18, 3:21 PM
    • #2
    • 14th Mar 18, 3:21 PM
    I did the same some years ago. It wasn't on the plans or mentioned by the planning dept, but the council building inspector said "he'd be happier" if a section of wall was underpinned, so I kept him happy

    It was never mentioned, I was never asked by anyone, only me and the building inspector knew . . .

    ps: it's still standing

    • AdrianC
    • By AdrianC 14th Mar 18, 3:53 PM
    • 17,388 Posts
    • 15,738 Thanks
    AdrianC
    • #3
    • 14th Mar 18, 3:53 PM
    • #3
    • 14th Mar 18, 3:53 PM
    No. The problem with "underpinning" is simply that it's usually done in response to where the problem really lies. Subsidence...

    Underpinning because of subsidence is an after-the-horse's-bolted repair.
    Underpinning while extending is a preventative upgrading of the foundations to take the additional load.
    • Carrot007
    • By Carrot007 14th Mar 18, 4:01 PM
    • 1,134 Posts
    • 981 Thanks
    Carrot007
    • #4
    • 14th Mar 18, 4:01 PM
    • #4
    • 14th Mar 18, 4:01 PM
    Depends on the questions the insurer asks.

    Web/Comparison sites will probably go as far as "Has the property ever been underpinned?" Which you would answer yes to and the cost would increase.

    You will be able to find cheap quotes still but would need to engage with someone! And a minimum wage drone will be no better than a web site here you need someone who can actually do things. Easiest would be a (real) broker.
    • eshroom
    • By eshroom 14th Mar 18, 4:02 PM
    • 115 Posts
    • 15 Thanks
    eshroom
    • #5
    • 14th Mar 18, 4:02 PM
    • #5
    • 14th Mar 18, 4:02 PM
    No. The problem with "underpinning" is simply that it's usually done in response to where the problem really lies. Subsidence...

    Underpinning because of subsidence is an after-the-horse's-bolted repair.
    Underpinning while extending is a preventative upgrading of the foundations to take the additional load.
    Originally posted by AdrianC
    Understood. That!!!8217;s good to know. Thanks!
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 14th Mar 18, 5:36 PM
    • 25,017 Posts
    • 68,500 Thanks
    Doozergirl
    • #6
    • 14th Mar 18, 5:36 PM
    • #6
    • 14th Mar 18, 5:36 PM
    The question insurers usually ask is 'has itnsuffered with subsidence' rather than 'has it been underpinned'. However, even if the question were about underpinning I would still answer 'no' as it is effectively a new foundation for the new extension and will be acknowledged by building control as such.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • Tom99
    • By Tom99 14th Mar 18, 6:13 PM
    • 2,070 Posts
    • 1,393 Thanks
    Tom99
    • #7
    • 14th Mar 18, 6:13 PM
    • #7
    • 14th Mar 18, 6:13 PM
    Just looked at Confused, they ask Agree/Disagree:
    1 - The property has not previously been underpinned or otherwise had its foundation reinforced?
    2 - The property has never shown any signs or been monitored for subsidence, landslip or heave?
    • AdrianC
    • By AdrianC 14th Mar 18, 6:58 PM
    • 17,388 Posts
    • 15,738 Thanks
    AdrianC
    • #8
    • 14th Mar 18, 6:58 PM
    • #8
    • 14th Mar 18, 6:58 PM
    Just looked at Confused, they ask Agree/Disagree:
    1 - The property has not previously been underpinned or otherwise had its foundation reinforced?
    2 - The property has never shown any signs or been monitored for subsidence, landslip or heave?
    Originally posted by Tom99
    So that would be disagree to the first, agree to the second.
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 14th Mar 18, 7:15 PM
    • 25,017 Posts
    • 68,500 Thanks
    Doozergirl
    • #9
    • 14th Mar 18, 7:15 PM
    • #9
    • 14th Mar 18, 7:15 PM
    So that would be disagree to the first, agree to the second.
    Originally posted by AdrianC
    I'd still agree that it hadn't, because I am cynical of that questionz. It should make no detrimental difference to their risk assessment of the property. Which is what those questions are seeking to do.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
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