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  • FIRST POST
    • MSE Nick T
    • By MSE Nick T 13th Mar 18, 12:44 PM
    • 12Posts
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    MSE Nick T
    0 WOW
    How do you eat yours?
    • #1
    • 13th Mar 18, 12:44 PM
    0 WOW
    How do you eat yours? 13th Mar 18 at 12:44 PM
    Hey Guys, we're having a good old natter over this one:

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-43372765

    I personally think the cream goes first with the jam nestled safely on-top. But some of the other food differences across the UK totally baffle me.

    What do we think?
Page 1
    • kathrynha
    • By kathrynha 13th Mar 18, 12:56 PM
    • 2,161 Posts
    • 11,639 Thanks
    kathrynha
    • #2
    • 13th Mar 18, 12:56 PM
    • #2
    • 13th Mar 18, 12:56 PM
    Jam definitely under the cream. Other way round is just plain weird
    Weight loss start date: 3rd January 2017
    Weight loss total: 53 lb
    Last updated: 27th February 2018
    • CheapChick
    • By CheapChick 13th Mar 18, 2:10 PM
    • 26 Posts
    • 22 Thanks
    CheapChick
    • #3
    • 13th Mar 18, 2:10 PM
    • #3
    • 13th Mar 18, 2:10 PM
    Of course it's jam underneath and cream on top!!

    Those the other side of the border have no idea what they are talking about!!

    Proud Cornish Maid now living in Surrey!!
    • MSE Nick T
    • By MSE Nick T 13th Mar 18, 2:28 PM
    • 12 Posts
    • 10 Thanks
    MSE Nick T
    • #4
    • 13th Mar 18, 2:28 PM
    • #4
    • 13th Mar 18, 2:28 PM
    But then where do we sit with pasties, tea and the ever so famous fry up?
    • robin58
    • By robin58 13th Mar 18, 11:09 PM
    • 2,312 Posts
    • 2,593 Thanks
    robin58
    • #5
    • 13th Mar 18, 11:09 PM
    • #5
    • 13th Mar 18, 11:09 PM
    But then where do we sit with pasties, tea and the ever so famous fry up?
    Originally posted by MSE Nick T
    At a dinner table hopefully.
    The more I live, the more I learn.
    The more I learn, the more I grow.
    The more I grow, the more I see.
    The more I see, the more I know.
    The more I know, the more I see,
    How little I know.!!
    • VfM4meplse
    • By VfM4meplse 14th Mar 18, 12:45 AM
    • 25,610 Posts
    • 54,325 Thanks
    VfM4meplse
    • #6
    • 14th Mar 18, 12:45 AM
    • #6
    • 14th Mar 18, 12:45 AM
    At a dinner table hopefully.
    Originally posted by robin58
    Na, on a red gingham tablecloth placed upon a neatly manicured lawn.
    Value-for-money-for-me-puhleeze!

    "No man is worth, crawling on the earth"- adapted from Bob Crewe and Bob Gaudio

    Hope is not a strategy ...A child is for life, not just 18 years....Don't get me started on the NHS, because you won't win...If in doubt, don't pull out... I love chaz-ing!
    • kathrynha
    • By kathrynha 14th Mar 18, 8:17 AM
    • 2,161 Posts
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    kathrynha
    • #7
    • 14th Mar 18, 8:17 AM
    • #7
    • 14th Mar 18, 8:17 AM
    But then where do we sit with pasties, tea and the ever so famous fry up?
    Originally posted by MSE Nick T

    Pasties, rarely have them, never paid any attention to where the crimping is.
    Tea, milk last, as it helps you judge the strength better, but often drink in black.
    Breakfast, English, but if I'm in Scotland, Wales or Northern Ireland I would expect it to be served with their regional variation. Looking forward to some Lorne sausage and potato bread when I go to Scotland this summer
    Weight loss start date: 3rd January 2017
    Weight loss total: 53 lb
    Last updated: 27th February 2018
    • Pollycat
    • By Pollycat 14th Mar 18, 8:28 AM
    • 20,004 Posts
    • 53,677 Thanks
    Pollycat
    • #8
    • 14th Mar 18, 8:28 AM
    • #8
    • 14th Mar 18, 8:28 AM
    I'm English but wouldn't consider a fry-up breakfast to include hash browns (but I very rarely eat breakfast 'out' so am going on what we used to have for Sunday breakfast at home - which I left over 45 years ago when hash browns probably didn't exist).

    And replace the toast with fried bread.
    And add fried mushrooms.
    Hold the beans.

    I've not had a breakfast as described above for a lot of years though.
    • Wizard of Id
    • By Wizard of Id 14th Mar 18, 8:32 AM
    • 3,693 Posts
    • 14,009 Thanks
    Wizard of Id
    • #9
    • 14th Mar 18, 8:32 AM
    • #9
    • 14th Mar 18, 8:32 AM
    I am Scottish and in my late 50s

    A scone should be eaten with butter only, no cream or jam.

    A pasty should be a Forfar Bridie and no sign of crimping or veg.

    A fry-up should be grilled and have Scotch pancakes instead of beans.

    Porridge should only be eaten cold after it has solidified (or in biscuit form using my mums recipe)
    Every man is innocent until proven broke.
    Cryin won't help you, prayin won't do you no good.

    Keep Moving in 2018 Challenge - Target 3333 miles
    This week - 77.7
    Total so far - 1537.8
    • PLRFD
    • By PLRFD 14th Mar 18, 11:10 AM
    • 651 Posts
    • 637 Thanks
    PLRFD
    That's nothing here in Yorkshire we have jam on Yorkshire pudding.
    • kathrynha
    • By kathrynha 14th Mar 18, 11:12 AM
    • 2,161 Posts
    • 11,639 Thanks
    kathrynha
    That's nothing here in Yorkshire we have jam on Yorkshire pudding.
    Originally posted by PLRFD
    Yorkshire through and through and never known anyone put jam on a Yorkshire pudding. Golden syrup is normal sweet topping for a Yorkshire pud
    Weight loss start date: 3rd January 2017
    Weight loss total: 53 lb
    Last updated: 27th February 2018
    • VfM4meplse
    • By VfM4meplse 14th Mar 18, 1:33 PM
    • 25,610 Posts
    • 54,325 Thanks
    VfM4meplse
    Porridge should only be eaten cold after it has solidified (or in biscuit form using my mums recipe)
    Originally posted by Wizard of Id
    You forgot to mention the national trend for water and salt instead of milk
    Value-for-money-for-me-puhleeze!

    "No man is worth, crawling on the earth"- adapted from Bob Crewe and Bob Gaudio

    Hope is not a strategy ...A child is for life, not just 18 years....Don't get me started on the NHS, because you won't win...If in doubt, don't pull out... I love chaz-ing!
    • Pollycat
    • By Pollycat 14th Mar 18, 1:43 PM
    • 20,004 Posts
    • 53,677 Thanks
    Pollycat
    Yorkshire through and through and never known anyone put jam on a Yorkshire pudding. Golden syrup is normal sweet topping for a Yorkshire pud
    Originally posted by kathrynha
    My Grandad was Derbyshire born, bred and buried and he had jam on his batter puddings (he refused to call them Yorkshire puddings ).
    He also had batter puddings with gravy as a starter.
    • MSE Nick T
    • By MSE Nick T 15th Mar 18, 11:55 AM
    • 12 Posts
    • 10 Thanks
    MSE Nick T
    That's nothing here in Yorkshire we have jam on Yorkshire pudding.
    Originally posted by PLRFD
    I could totally get on board with this!
    • Wizard of Id
    • By Wizard of Id 15th Mar 18, 2:13 PM
    • 3,693 Posts
    • 14,009 Thanks
    Wizard of Id
    You forgot to mention the national trend for water and salt instead of milk
    Originally posted by VfM4meplse
    just to correct you, I in no way forgot about that, I don't care one way or the other as my mum made porridge both ways when I were a lad and I still had it cold in my lunch box.
    Every man is innocent until proven broke.
    Cryin won't help you, prayin won't do you no good.

    Keep Moving in 2018 Challenge - Target 3333 miles
    This week - 77.7
    Total so far - 1537.8
    • LiamSmith
    • By LiamSmith 21st Mar 18, 9:49 AM
    • 10 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    LiamSmith
    Cream only on top!
    • DigForVictory
    • By DigForVictory 25th Mar 18, 8:01 PM
    • 7,690 Posts
    • 22,207 Thanks
    DigForVictory
    My Cornish mother served cream splits yesterday - and laid out jam and cream for people to do as they deemed fit.

    One son was hauled off for a brief word after just applying a finger thick layer of cream and biting in. Duly chastened, he added a teaspoonful of jam to the top and carried on. For his second (& subsequent) splits, he went notably lighter on the cream but continued to put jam on top.

    Granny observed with a bright smile.
    I look forward to the reading of the will in years to come...


    As for pasties, tea and the ever so famous fry up - if we don't sit at a table, then the odds of making the Will drop like a rock. (Granny has Standards.)
    She makes her pasties with a crimped edge along the top (& skips the jam in on end idea.) Tea is served alongside another vessel of boiling water so those who do not wish to drink a strong brew can dilute to taste. The ever so famous fry up (as we practice it) is concealed from Granny who as a retired GP remains an active member of the Nazi Health Police & the exuberant calories might trigger a heart attack just Observing.
    Last edited by DigForVictory; 25-03-2018 at 8:06 PM.
    • PLRFD
    • By PLRFD 25th Mar 18, 9:47 PM
    • 651 Posts
    • 637 Thanks
    PLRFD
    Oh I so want those cream splits.
    • Murphybear
    • By Murphybear 27th Mar 18, 4:54 AM
    • 3,582 Posts
    • 7,354 Thanks
    Murphybear
    Long rivalry between Devon and Cornwall. It’s more natural to put cream on top. If you had fruit salad, pie or anything else that needs cream, you wouldn’t put a layer of cream first then the pie etc

    Having lived in Devon for 14 years, we’ve just moved to the Dorset/Somerset border so we’re looking for a different way for our cream teas
    • greyfox
    • By greyfox 27th Mar 18, 11:09 AM
    • 447 Posts
    • 2,439 Thanks
    greyfox
    Long rivalry between Devon and Cornwall. It’s more natural to put cream on top. If you had fruit salad, pie or anything else that needs cream, you wouldn’t put a layer of cream first then the pie etc
    Originally posted by Murphybear
    I've always understood that the (clotted) cream on a scone took the place of butter, so it was "more natural" to put it under the jam. I can see that if people are using whipped cream (perish the thought!) it wouldn't support the weight of the jam so would have to go on top.

    I'm a native Devononian - now living in Surrey - whose Father ate bread spread with clotted cream for his breakfast.
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