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  • FIRST POST
    • firsttimetom
    • By firsttimetom 12th Mar 18, 10:46 AM
    • 278Posts
    • 315Thanks
    firsttimetom
    Getting Signed off for Notice
    • #1
    • 12th Mar 18, 10:46 AM
    Getting Signed off for Notice 12th Mar 18 at 10:46 AM
    Hi All,

    In a previous thread some months I posted about how I was having some severe problems in my job that were having a big impact on my life in general.

    All the replies were that I was severely depressed, something I hadn't considered and something that on visiting my doctor she agreed with. She was of the impression that no matter how much medication or counselling I take, I would never get better unless I resigned.

    So off the back of that advice, that is what I've done but have 5 weeks to work on my notice and my job has now got even worse, and I'm at my lowest ever. I hadn't mentioned it to my employer that this has been happening, largely because I doubt they would care.

    I had been determined not to get myself signed off and work my notice out of some obscure loyalty to the business but I literally don't think I can anymore. I've been desperate not to leave them in the lurch but I think I might have to.

    So my question is, given my employer is unaware of how unwell I actually am, are there any repercussions to getting signed off for the rest of my notice?

    I actually don't even care if I don't get paid - I just want to get out.

    Thank you
Page 1
    • ReadingTim
    • By ReadingTim 12th Mar 18, 11:09 AM
    • 2,669 Posts
    • 3,814 Thanks
    ReadingTim
    • #2
    • 12th Mar 18, 11:09 AM
    • #2
    • 12th Mar 18, 11:09 AM
    Sadly, there is considerable stigma attached to stress, depression, mental illness etc - potential employers fear the worst if they see those words, or references to them anywhere.

    Get yourself signed off for depression, even whilst working your notice, and you risk that statement of fact being mentioned to future employers - xxx was signed off for depression for 5 weeks. That alone could be enough to scupper a potential next job.

    I would suggest this is a risk you should seek to avoid at all costs. Given you now know you're getting out in 5 weeks, is there any way you can just hang in there for the next month? Given Easter is coming up, surely you can use up remaining holiday, ensure you leave on time etc and just stick with it...? Bad as that may be, I fear the long-term alternative could be worse...
    • Smodlet
    • By Smodlet 12th Mar 18, 1:25 PM
    • 3,011 Posts
    • 6,048 Thanks
    Smodlet
    • #3
    • 12th Mar 18, 1:25 PM
    • #3
    • 12th Mar 18, 1:25 PM
    Five weeks from now = 16th April so, assuming you work Mon-Fri, you will be free at close of play on 13th April. I feel for you, OP, but ReadingTim may well have a point. It depends on what you want to achieve.

    I appreciate you may feel you have no energy to undertake anything new at the moment but, unless your job is physical, it is probably mental energy you lack so a change is as good as a rest.

    Do you have another job to go to? If not, why not focus on finding one if only as a means of distraction from your current one?

    Do you need a break from working as soon as you finish? Just keep your eyes on the prize and try to do things you enjoy as much as possible in your free time for the next five weeks. Perhaps you could start a really good book or a new TV series to give yourself something to look forward to after work every day. Do you have a social life? Friends or family to support you?

    Maybe think about learning a new skill or just doing something you don't normally do like cooking, gardening, going for walks, volunteering. Do you like animals? If so and you have none of your own, do you know anyone/a local animal shelter who could offer you some furry time? Animals do not judge us by anything other than our actions; it is so refreshing.

    Perhaps you could look into evening classes to find a new interest or even a new career path.

    Just hang in there; or go sick. Only you know what outcome you want but five weeks is not really long in normal circumstances. If nothing else, you have a source of support on here, I hope. Take care of you.
    Last edited by Smodlet; 12-03-2018 at 2:19 PM.
    What is this life if, sweet wordsmith, we have no time to take the pith?
    Every stew starts with the first onion.
    I took it upon myself to investigate a trifle; it had custard, jelly, soggy sponge things...
    • BorisThomson
    • By BorisThomson 12th Mar 18, 1:41 PM
    • 1,586 Posts
    • 3,420 Thanks
    BorisThomson
    • #4
    • 12th Mar 18, 1:41 PM
    • #4
    • 12th Mar 18, 1:41 PM
    Would we be suggesting someone with a physical illness just hang in there?

    Before responding it would be worth reading the OP's previous post on the subject to understand just how unwell he is feeling. He is clearly not fit for work.

    (I'm not disagreeing with any of the points made by previous posters, just pointing out the difference in the way we treat mental and physical illness.)
    • TELLIT01
    • By TELLIT01 12th Mar 18, 2:07 PM
    • 4,890 Posts
    • 5,222 Thanks
    TELLIT01
    • #5
    • 12th Mar 18, 2:07 PM
    • #5
    • 12th Mar 18, 2:07 PM
    Would we be suggesting someone with a physical illness just hang in there?

    (I'm not disagreeing with any of the points made by previous posters, just pointing out the difference in the way we treat mental and physical illness.)
    Originally posted by BorisThomson
    No we probably wouldn't be advising them to try and stick it out with a physical injury, but as you say mental illness is looked at by many employers in an entirely different light. With a physical injury there is an assumption that once it's fixed everything is going to be OK. With mental illness there is an underlying concern that it will happen again.
    I'm not saying it's right or that it's fair but, if the OP is able to switch off from the problems at work now that they know they are leaving, it could be advantageous to them when job hunting.
    • Smodlet
    • By Smodlet 12th Mar 18, 2:08 PM
    • 3,011 Posts
    • 6,048 Thanks
    Smodlet
    • #6
    • 12th Mar 18, 2:08 PM
    • #6
    • 12th Mar 18, 2:08 PM
    Admittedly, read this in a vacuum so don't know the poster's history. Sorry.
    What is this life if, sweet wordsmith, we have no time to take the pith?
    Every stew starts with the first onion.
    I took it upon myself to investigate a trifle; it had custard, jelly, soggy sponge things...
    • ReadingTim
    • By ReadingTim 12th Mar 18, 2:14 PM
    • 2,669 Posts
    • 3,814 Thanks
    ReadingTim
    • #7
    • 12th Mar 18, 2:14 PM
    • #7
    • 12th Mar 18, 2:14 PM
    Would we be suggesting someone with a physical illness just hang in there?

    Before responding it would be worth reading the OP's previous post on the subject to understand just how unwell he is feeling. He is clearly not fit for work.

    (I'm not disagreeing with any of the points made by previous posters, just pointing out the difference in the way we treat mental and physical illness.)
    Originally posted by BorisThomson
    The difference in the way physical and mental illnesses are treated is the reason why someone who's clearly not up to it is being advised to stick with it...

    It's not logical, it's not right, but it happens. All too often. Sometimes there isn't a "...happily ever after" ending, and you can't pick the best outcome, but only get the choice of the least bad one. This is one of those cases. Short term misery in employment being less bad than long term misery in unemployment.
    • theoretica
    • By theoretica 12th Mar 18, 4:26 PM
    • 5,157 Posts
    • 6,403 Thanks
    theoretica
    • #8
    • 12th Mar 18, 4:26 PM
    • #8
    • 12th Mar 18, 4:26 PM
    Have you asked your employer to let you leave before the end of your notice? If you go to them straight and say you are on the point of getting signed off and it would be simpler for both of you if they agreed an early leaving date instead it might get you out of there sooner.
    But a banker, engaged at enormous expense,
    Had the whole of their cash in his care.
    Lewis Carroll
    • steampowered
    • By steampowered 12th Mar 18, 6:53 PM
    • 2,494 Posts
    • 2,410 Thanks
    steampowered
    • #9
    • 12th Mar 18, 6:53 PM
    • #9
    • 12th Mar 18, 6:53 PM
    The only potential disadvantage of getting signed off is that your employer may not be willing to give you a reference.

    If you are genuinely unwell, you should follow your doctor's advice. If that means getting signed-off then fair enough.
    • Ja7188
    • By Ja7188 12th Mar 18, 7:22 PM
    • 153 Posts
    • 164 Thanks
    Ja7188
    It could help to get a calendar and count down the working days until you leave - my ex did that with a job she hated and it helped get her through each working day.
    • pmduk
    • By pmduk 12th Mar 18, 8:15 PM
    • 8,339 Posts
    • 6,160 Thanks
    pmduk
    I suspect theoretica's idea is likely to work best for all parties involved.
    • weavedribbon
    • By weavedribbon 13th Mar 18, 1:07 PM
    • 106 Posts
    • 269 Thanks
    weavedribbon
    To be honest, I find some of the advice on this thread pretty upsetting in terms of "it's not that long, just stick it out". For somebody struggling with severe depression it really doesn't work like that, it isn't just a matter of willpower. Even the ideas of doing enjoyable things outside of work; it may well be that right now the OP hasn't got any motivation to or desire to manage these things.

    OP, assuming you want to work for a company that shows some care to employees and doesn't stigmatise mental illness, I think if you are prepared to be upfront with potential new employers and stress it was primarily workplace related circumstances, most employers worth working for would be open to discussing it with you and understand that it doesn't show a lack of commitment, weakness etc.

    I really hope you feel better soon.
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