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  • FIRST POST
    • Mulder00
    • By Mulder00 12th Mar 18, 10:15 AM
    • 488Posts
    • 431Thanks
    Mulder00
    Washer dryer tripping electrics
    • #1
    • 12th Mar 18, 10:15 AM
    Washer dryer tripping electrics 12th Mar 18 at 10:15 AM
    The drying part of our washer dryer stopped working about 9 months ago. The washing machine part was working, so it wasn't an urgent issue to deal with.

    Finally had someone around to take a look and the dryer fan motor had completely seized up (this thing: https://shop.aeg.co.uk/Laundry/Washing-Machines/Motors-%26-Pumps/Washing-Dryer-Fan-Motor-Assembly/p/1323243442). This was replaced this morning and the guy put the drying part on for about 15 minutes and it all seemed healthy (things heating up, motor spinning etc). The motor he removed was not as stuck as he said and with a bit of moving, it started moving (it was just caked on fluff, not melted plastic as he had previously suggested). Maybe I should put the old one on eBay...

    As he was about to leave, he went to turn off the dryer, but then turned it one notch too far onto the washing cycle and it immediately tripped the electrics (the one with the earth leak test button next to it). He then opened up the machine again and said that it's all fine when he disconnects the dryer, so it's probably just with not using the dryer that moisture got in up there and I need to let it dry out for a bit.

    If it still trips, he said I would need to replace the heating element too otherwise he can just disconnect the heating element and I can continue using the machine for washing.

    I'm leaving it now for it to dry out a bit, but does this sound right to anyone who knows? His invoice came to just under 300 and if I had known this wasn't going to resolve the issue, I would have just bought a new one!!!
Page 1
    • Aylesbury Duck
    • By Aylesbury Duck 12th Mar 18, 10:20 AM
    • 2,315 Posts
    • 3,137 Thanks
    Aylesbury Duck
    • #2
    • 12th Mar 18, 10:20 AM
    • #2
    • 12th Mar 18, 10:20 AM
    It doesn't sound right to me. Moisture in a washing machine? Who'd have thought it. So he's suggesting that you let the machine (and presumably the clothes in it) dry out completely before using the dryer? Right.

    Have you run a complete wash-dry cycle yet, to see if it works and doesn't trip the circuit?
    Please forgive the deliberate omission of apostrophes on some posts whilst I await MSE to do something about the daft codes that appear in their place when typing on certain devices.
    • Mulder00
    • By Mulder00 12th Mar 18, 10:26 AM
    • 488 Posts
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    Mulder00
    • #3
    • 12th Mar 18, 10:26 AM
    • #3
    • 12th Mar 18, 10:26 AM
    I cannot run a wash cycle as the moment I try, it trips the electrics. I'm heading out soon, so will try it out tonight to see.
    • Aylesbury Duck
    • By Aylesbury Duck 12th Mar 18, 10:33 AM
    • 2,315 Posts
    • 3,137 Thanks
    Aylesbury Duck
    • #4
    • 12th Mar 18, 10:33 AM
    • #4
    • 12th Mar 18, 10:33 AM
    I think that the chap has either connected something incorrectly, or has damaged/disturbed circuitry in doing his work, or the failure is just an unfortunate coincidence of timing.

    Whatever the reason, don't run the machine unattended if it does start working again because it could pose a fire risk if there's an underlying problem.
    Please forgive the deliberate omission of apostrophes on some posts whilst I await MSE to do something about the daft codes that appear in their place when typing on certain devices.
    • macman
    • By macman 12th Mar 18, 11:09 AM
    • 42,686 Posts
    • 17,957 Thanks
    macman
    • #5
    • 12th Mar 18, 11:09 AM
    • #5
    • 12th Mar 18, 11:09 AM
    Assuming it's plugged in and not hard wired, unplug it and connect to a different ring main using an extension lead (most houses will have at least 2 or 3, usually separate for upstairs, down and kitchen). By doing that you can rule out a problem with the socket, circuit or MCB on the existing circuit. Also check that the plug wiring and flex is OK.
    Then get a new white goods repair person in, because this guy clearly doesn't have a clue how to do basic fault-finding, or the equipment to check for earth leakage. He's just a parts-swapper. Why have you paid him to replace a part that was not seized in the first place-did he not inspect it before ordering the part?
    Last edited by macman; 12-03-2018 at 11:13 AM.
    No free lunch, and no free laptop
    • Ectophile
    • By Ectophile 12th Mar 18, 8:03 PM
    • 3,293 Posts
    • 2,118 Thanks
    Ectophile
    • #6
    • 12th Mar 18, 8:03 PM
    • #6
    • 12th Mar 18, 8:03 PM
    It's not unknown for heating elements to absorb water and start tripping electrics. Ovens can do it as well if used unused for long enough.

    Obviously, a new element would fix that. There are ways of cooking the damp out of the element, but doing so generally involves defeating all the safety precautions in the electrics, so you can run it without tripping the breaker, and it isn't advisable unless you know what you're doing.
    If it sticks, force it.
    If it breaks, well it wasn't working right anyway.
    • EssexExile
    • By EssexExile 12th Mar 18, 9:35 PM
    • 3,101 Posts
    • 2,176 Thanks
    EssexExile
    • #7
    • 12th Mar 18, 9:35 PM
    • #7
    • 12th Mar 18, 9:35 PM
    It's not unknown for heating elements to absorb water and start tripping electrics. Ovens can do it as well if used unused for long enough.
    Originally posted by Ectophile
    I know it happens with ovens but washing machines? They're designed to be wet all the time.
    Tall, dark & handsome. Well two out of three ain't bad.
    • another casualty
    • By another casualty 13th Mar 18, 8:53 AM
    • 3,648 Posts
    • 5,696 Thanks
    another casualty
    • #8
    • 13th Mar 18, 8:53 AM
    • #8
    • 13th Mar 18, 8:53 AM
    In my last flat ( I was on a 6 month tenancy ), the landlady had bad electrics in the flat . There was no gas, just electric.
    The light in the kitchen would flash randomly .

    I had a problem where the washing machine and fridge freezer would both randomly trip . I managed to use the fridge freezer with an extension lead when this happened one weekend. I managed to change the fuse and fridge freezer was working again . The light inside was not working though.
    The landlady ordered a new washing machine to be delivered and I fitted that and the old one replaced. No more problems after that.
    Bizarre .
    • Mulder00
    • By Mulder00 14th Mar 18, 7:33 AM
    • 488 Posts
    • 431 Thanks
    Mulder00
    • #9
    • 14th Mar 18, 7:33 AM
    • #9
    • 14th Mar 18, 7:33 AM
    Apologies for the time taken to respond here. I left it until that night and ended up running a full wash-dry cycle without issue. I did the same thing last night.

    So I take it that the guy who does this for a living knew what he what talking about then
    • Cavalyman
    • By Cavalyman 10th Apr 18, 2:32 PM
    • 3 Posts
    • 5 Thanks
    Cavalyman
    Common problems for an appliance tripping the RCD:

    Faulty or failing heating element - sometimes the fault can only be diagnosed with an insulation tester!
    Faulty door lock
    Moisture in the machine
    PCB or motor

    This is after all the basic checks like making sure the plus is wired correctly etc.
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