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  • FIRST POST
    • SouthLondonUser
    • By SouthLondonUser 11th Mar 18, 11:46 PM
    • 512Posts
    • 77Thanks
    SouthLondonUser
    Nearly new cars: where's the catch?
    • #1
    • 11th Mar 18, 11:46 PM
    Nearly new cars: where's the catch? 11th Mar 18 at 11:46 PM
    I have found a 'nearly new' car I'm interested in. It's on sale at the official dealer, is less than 12 months old (67 plate), £4,000 miles, and with ca. 3 years of remaining official warranty from the manufacturer.

    Why would cars so 'young' ever be on sale? I thought of a write off, but it's not classified as a Cat S/D/C/N .

    Maybe it's an ex-demo? The company car of someone who resigned / was fired / died less than a year after getting the car?

    I am sceptical, but I'm hoping that the official warranty should give me some peace of mind.

    Thoughts? Would you consider a car like this or is the risk of a lemon too high?
Page 2
    • John-K
    • By John-K 12th Mar 18, 10:51 PM
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    John-K
    Lots of reasons.

    There are a few idiots who like having new cars.
    Originally posted by IanMSpencer
    Fewer, I think, than idiots who make generalisations like yours there.

    I normally buy used, but two nice cars that I have had in years past were bought new. A B7 RS4, and the previous C63 AMG. Both are cars that owners tend to drive quite hard, and so both were ones that I wanted from new. I see no idiocy in that at all.
    • John-K
    • By John-K 12th Mar 18, 10:54 PM
    • 654 Posts
    • 1,016 Thanks
    John-K
    My neighbour has a new car every 6 months. Just waiting for the 18 plate to turn up
    Originally posted by gettingtheresometime
    I do not understand this. New cars can still have issues. A few months in, if yours has developed no rattles, squeaks, or vibrations, then you’ve likely got a good one, and ai would then enjoy it for a few years.

    Getting a new one every six months would drive me mad, having to inspect it, get the paintwork corrected, get the running-in service done etc.
    • motorguy
    • By motorguy 13th Mar 18, 8:41 AM
    • 16,771 Posts
    • 9,946 Thanks
    motorguy
    My neighbour has a new car every 6 months. Just waiting for the 18 plate to turn up
    Originally posted by gettingtheresometime
    I'm going to take a stab in the dark here and say she has connections with a manufacturer, has a company car or is related to someone who is in a manufacturers friends and family scheme.

    A private buyer changing a new car every 6 months would almost certainly be madness.
    "We have normality. I repeat, we have normality. Anything you still can't cope with is therefore your own problem."
    • motorguy
    • By motorguy 13th Mar 18, 8:45 AM
    • 16,771 Posts
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    motorguy

    There are a few idiots who like having new cars.
    Originally posted by IanMSpencer
    If they're buying new and changing their car every few months, then most likely yes, however there are many reasons why people otherwise buy new particularly with so many incentives in place currently from manufacturers.
    "We have normality. I repeat, we have normality. Anything you still can't cope with is therefore your own problem."
    • Penelopa.Pitstop
    • By Penelopa.Pitstop 13th Mar 18, 10:01 AM
    • 292 Posts
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    Penelopa.Pitstop
    Getting a new one every six months would drive me mad, having to inspect it, get the paintwork corrected, get the running-in service done etc.
    Originally posted by John-K
    If you change cars often, you don't care about paint correction, running in or running in service, etc. You just drive it and hand it back. Not caring is much cheaper than caring.

    It's probably company car anyway, so your neighbour is not bothered with all these.

    • verityboo
    • By verityboo 13th Mar 18, 11:03 AM
    • 926 Posts
    • 1,152 Thanks
    verityboo
    I know 2 people who have bought nearly new cars (one 9 months old, one 12 months old) which turned out to be complete lemons

    One had been in an accident and severely damaged (but not written off) but very poorly repaired under the surface which is probably why the original owner got rid of it. The new owner had no end of problems with it which weren't covered by the normal manufacturers warranty so he had to fight each time to get sorted

    The second had a recurring fault where the airbag fault warning light would light up, the garage would reset it and 2 weeks later it would light up again. They just didn't seem able to cure the problem (perhaps why the original owner got fed up & got rid of it) and after a few months the second owner got rid

    There are doubtless some good second hand nearly new cars but anyone buying one needs to satisfy themselves about the history of the car before purchasing
    • Frozen_up_north
    • By Frozen_up_north 13th Mar 18, 11:18 AM
    • 1,491 Posts
    • 725 Thanks
    Frozen_up_north
    Thanks. Would you pay for a pre purchase inspection by the likes of the AA or RAC (ca. £200), or would you think there's no need, given the warranty?
    Originally posted by SouthLondonUser
    If it is from a main dealer, it will come with a full inspection that is manufacturer backed. Your £200 would be wasted.

    My last two cars were about 6 months old and were sales staff company cars from car dealerships. As others have said, car showrooms like to have the latest model to demonstrate and also need to turn over an agreed number of cars per month, resulting in a number of nearly new cars for sale each month.

    Main dealers should be able to source similar cars from other main dealers too, so if you are looking for a specific colour/trim/engine variant, ask and see what they come up with. There should not be a delivery charge if you are prepared to wait a few days for a spare space on a car transporter.

    My current car (6 month old) came from a main dealer 200 miles away, arranged through the local dealer... no extra charge for delivery.
    • motorguy
    • By motorguy 13th Mar 18, 1:07 PM
    • 16,771 Posts
    • 9,946 Thanks
    motorguy
    I know 2 people who have bought nearly new cars (one 9 months old, one 12 months old) which turned out to be complete lemons

    One had been in an accident and severely damaged (but not written off) but very poorly repaired under the surface which is probably why the original owner got rid of it. The new owner had no end of problems with it which weren't covered by the normal manufacturers warranty so he had to fight each time to get sorted

    The second had a recurring fault where the airbag fault warning light would light up, the garage would reset it and 2 weeks later it would light up again. They just didn't seem able to cure the problem (perhaps why the original owner got fed up & got rid of it) and after a few months the second owner got rid

    There are doubtless some good second hand nearly new cars but anyone buying one needs to satisfy themselves about the history of the car before purchasing
    Originally posted by verityboo
    The trick is to buy the car from the dealer franchise. They get the Grade A cars, and often cost no more than the car supermarkets / independents anyway.

    If something goes wrong, they have the technology and abilities to fix it. Merely resetting the airbig light is not resolving the cause its treating the symptoms.
    "We have normality. I repeat, we have normality. Anything you still can't cope with is therefore your own problem."
    • telemarks
    • By telemarks 13th Mar 18, 1:21 PM
    • 184 Posts
    • 131 Thanks
    telemarks
    Hire cars hidden on V5
    +1Absolutely ask the dealer for information on who owned it previously.
    And DONT just accept their word - ask to see the V5C. A lot will say "ex management car", when it in reality was an ex hire car..
    Originally posted by motorguy
    Agree with this. We bought a 6 months old car recently, from the manufacture local main dealer.

    The salesman was very honest about it and said first off that the car had one lease company name on the V5, but that the leasee had been a hire company, and the car had been used as a hire car. They had several like this on the forecourt.

    He said this was VERY common thing for dealers to do, as it gets a car registered to meet their sales quotas, and as part of the contract the main dealer gets to buy the car back at a good price after 6 months with guaranteed milage, that they can then sell on at "cost".

    The car was at a great price, great condition and will good remaining warenty, so we bought it. So far its faultless, and very cheap driving

    The lesson here is that you can't even trust the V5, as a hire car can easily be hidden on that. Asking questions of people you trust is the only way to be sure.
    • telemarks
    • By telemarks 13th Mar 18, 1:31 PM
    • 184 Posts
    • 131 Thanks
    telemarks
    I have found a 'nearly new' car I'm interested in. It's on sale at the official dealer, is less than 12 months old (67 plate), £4,000 miles, and with ca. 3 years of remaining official warranty from the manufacturer.
    Originally posted by SouthLondonUser
    One thing to consider here is Car Tax. For instance we bought a car with 118g/km CO2 registered on 30/3/17. Car Tax for this is £30 per year,

    If it had been registerd two days latter, it would cost £140 per year. If you keep the car 10 years, thats a massive £1100 more.

    Thats a big discount on some cars 12+ months old, and well worth factoring in. You may be able to use car tax as a haggling point on the 67 plate vs. a 66
    • redux
    • By redux 13th Mar 18, 1:36 PM
    • 18,242 Posts
    • 24,133 Thanks
    redux
    I bought my car as a "management car", about 9k miles, 12 months old and about 35% of new list price, which I reckon was about 25% off a typical best discount I could negotiate as a private buyer. Apart from some bumper scuffs on the rear bumper under the load, it was as new with manufacturer's warranty. The only "fault" I've had with it has been a failing battery and the side effects that go with that (which are quite a lot!). Just over 5 years old now and essentially still as new at 40k miles.
    Originally posted by IanMSpencer
    My neighbour has a new car every 6 months. Just waiting for the 18 plate to turn up
    Originally posted by gettingtheresometime
    I'm going to take a stab in the dark here and say she has connections with a manufacturer, has a company car or is related to someone who is in a manufacturers friends and family scheme.

    A private buyer changing a new car every 6 months would almost certainly be madness.
    Originally posted by motorguy
    A friend of my mother is a retired manager from a car manufacturer and has a new car every few months.

    Maybe he buys with a substantial discount and then resells privately at a slight profit, or I'd guess more likely he just trades them in in the scheme and they come into the main dealer network. I haven't asked.

    My car was owned by Citroen for the first 18 months, then the next owner for 30 months. I bought it 4 years old with 24,000 miles for about a quarter of the original list price, from a small independent dealer who I assume had it from a main dealer. Still going 14.5 years and 199,000 miles later, but that's off-topic.
    • IanMSpencer
    • By IanMSpencer 13th Mar 18, 5:34 PM
    • 1,462 Posts
    • 1,080 Thanks
    IanMSpencer
    Fewer, I think, than idiots who make generalisations like yours there.

    I normally buy used, but two nice cars that I have had in years past were bought new. A B7 RS4, and the previous C63 AMG. Both are cars that owners tend to drive quite hard, and so both were ones that I wanted from new. I see no idiocy in that at all.
    Originally posted by John-K
    You've taken that out of context, though I see why you've taken it as meaning something other than I meant. Nothing wrong with a new car, someone has to and in my time I've had 2 (one Cavalier, one Merc which I kept for 12 years and SWMBO had a Q3 last year because she wanted one, had a very large bonus and was coming out of the company car scheme), and enjoyed the experience.

    What I was alluding to was the few who always want the current number plate, they have to be seen to have a new car for the sake of it being new. For there to be six month old private buyer cars, then there are people who buy a car and trade it in 6 months later. Those people who continually change their cars to be in the newest I think are foolish - a 12 month old car is barely run in, and yet people want to change after 6 months. There is someone down the road who has changed their car after less than a year and I am fairly sure it is because after we ordered a new Audi, they had a near identical car in the same colour and they had to drive past ours.

    So let me rephrase - here are a few idiots who have to have a new car all the time, every plate change and get very little use out it (which is the type of car we are discussing in this thread). And that is idiotic because in terms of the ownership experience, there is going to be no difference, there is a load of hassle in paperwork and payment, there is the massive loss of money, there is the potential for teething problems on any car, and there is the mistaken belief that people are going to be impressed by you always having the newest car.

    I will also make an exception. I have a mate who does massive mileages (national property surveyor) and he would clock up 40k in a year easily, He leased and generally changed every year. His main mistake was trying to that mileage in a Range Rover.
    • Car 54
    • By Car 54 13th Mar 18, 6:09 PM
    • 3,034 Posts
    • 1,905 Thanks
    Car 54
    I do not understand this. New cars can still have issues. A few months in, if yours has developed no rattles, squeaks, or vibrations, then you’ve likely got a good one, and ai would then enjoy it for a few years.

    Getting a new one every six months would drive me mad, having to inspect it, get the paintwork corrected, get the running-in service done etc.
    Originally posted by John-K
    Running-in service? Didn't that disappear about the 1980s?
    • stuwho
    • By stuwho 13th Mar 18, 9:44 PM
    • 30 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    stuwho
    Not sure why it's done, but a few dealers pre register cars, then sell them after around 6 months. Not sure of tbe benefits. Bought one a while back that was just over 6 months old. Thought it was a one off demonstrator, but we were then asked what colour we wanted. Possibly used as courtesy cars & demonstrators, but with full warranty, & usually quite big savings, well worth it.
    • Car 54
    • By Car 54 13th Mar 18, 10:19 PM
    • 3,034 Posts
    • 1,905 Thanks
    Car 54
    Not sure why it's done, but a few dealers pre register cars, then sell them after around 6 months. Not sure of tbe benefits. Bought one a while back that was just over 6 months old. Thought it was a one off demonstrator, but we were then asked what colour we wanted. Possibly used as courtesy cars & demonstrators, but with full warranty, & usually quite big savings, well worth it.
    Originally posted by stuwho
    I've done that too. Six months old, choice of cars, negligible mileage so not used as demos etc.

    The only downside is the first service was due at six months rather than twelve.
    • Deneb
    • By Deneb 14th Mar 18, 7:31 AM
    • 309 Posts
    • 242 Thanks
    Deneb
    Not sure why it's done, but a few dealers pre register cars, then sell them after around 6 months. Not sure of tbe benefits. Bought one a while back that was just over 6 months old. Thought it was a one off demonstrator, but we were then asked what colour we wanted. Possibly used as courtesy cars & demonstrators, but with full warranty, & usually quite big savings, well worth it.
    Originally posted by stuwho
    They often get bonuses tied to the number of vehicles they sell. Self registering is a trick to qualify for the bonus if sales are below target.

    My current car is a Volvo that I bought 1 month old with less than 80 miles on the clock. One of 15 identical cars apart from colour, all of which the dealer had self-registered on 31st December 2016 to qualify. 33% off list price, 50% deposit and balance interest free over 3 years.
    • motorguy
    • By motorguy 14th Mar 18, 8:33 AM
    • 16,771 Posts
    • 9,946 Thanks
    motorguy
    They often get bonuses tied to the number of vehicles they sell. Self registering is a trick to qualify for the bonus if sales are below target.

    My current car is a Volvo that I bought 1 month old with less than 80 miles on the clock. One of 15 identical cars apart from colour, all of which the dealer had self-registered on 31st December 2016 to qualify. 33% off list price, 50% deposit and balance interest free over 3 years.
    Originally posted by Deneb
    Manufacturers will also incentivise dealer groups to buy and pay (dealers normally get something like 6 months to pay for cars) for a set amount of cars and register them now. There are various reasons for this :-

    (a) the manufacturer can increase market share for that period because its calculated on cars registered
    (b) the cars may be old stock
    (c) there may have been / be an upcoming spec / engine change
    (d) they might be previous model year cars
    (e) they might be a cancelled lease / company car order
    "We have normality. I repeat, we have normality. Anything you still can't cope with is therefore your own problem."
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