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  • FIRST POST
    • lmartin87
    • By lmartin87 11th Mar 18, 8:12 PM
    • 18Posts
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    lmartin87
    Building regs - do they apply?
    • #1
    • 11th Mar 18, 8:12 PM
    Building regs - do they apply? 11th Mar 18 at 8:12 PM
    In the process of buying a detatched property. Solicitors engaged, searches requested and I'm about to return signed contract, TR1 and mortgage deed.

    I was aware that an internal wall had been knocked through from the master bedroom to the fourth bedroom to create a dressing room. The space knocked through is about double-door size equivalent, with the rest of the wall remaining in place. However, this has not been mentioned on the PIF.

    What the PIF does mention though, which I hadn't appreciated although it does make sense, is that what is now a very spacious lounge / diner was previously separate lounge and dining rooms which have been knocked through. The seller has indicated on the PIF that this change was 'exempt from building regs'.

    I'm going to pick up with solicitor tomorrow about these - but does this sound right? As from what I've read online this evening it seems even the most minor change made internally may require a certificate of completion from building control?

    Really hoping this does not become a barrier as both us and our vendors are keen to proceed ASAP.
Page 1
    • AnotherJoe
    • By AnotherJoe 11th Mar 18, 8:15 PM
    • 9,432 Posts
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    AnotherJoe
    • #2
    • 11th Mar 18, 8:15 PM
    • #2
    • 11th Mar 18, 8:15 PM
    I would presume it would be exempt if it was not a supporting wall. Do you know if it was?
    • lmartin87
    • By lmartin87 11th Mar 18, 8:17 PM
    • 18 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    lmartin87
    • #3
    • 11th Mar 18, 8:17 PM
    • #3
    • 11th Mar 18, 8:17 PM
    In case it helps, property was built 2009 and changes were made in 2016.

    4.1 (a) states: "Partition wall (non-bearing) between living + dining room removed"
    4.2 states: "Work was exempt from building regulations"
    • lmartin87
    • By lmartin87 11th Mar 18, 8:20 PM
    • 18 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    lmartin87
    • #4
    • 11th Mar 18, 8:20 PM
    • #4
    • 11th Mar 18, 8:20 PM
    I would presume it would be exempt if it was not a supporting wall. Do you know if it was?
    Originally posted by AnotherJoe
    That's what I'm hoping - but Google has be worried .
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 11th Mar 18, 8:22 PM
    • 25,025 Posts
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    Doozergirl
    • #5
    • 11th Mar 18, 8:22 PM
    • #5
    • 11th Mar 18, 8:22 PM
    If it's non load bearing then it is likely that it is exempt.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • lmartin87
    • By lmartin87 11th Mar 18, 8:25 PM
    • 18 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    lmartin87
    • #6
    • 11th Mar 18, 8:25 PM
    • #6
    • 11th Mar 18, 8:25 PM
    I suppose the solicitor didn't mention it in their original enquiries - which perhaps they would have if it was an issue? I'm a FTB so this is all a bit new to me.
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 11th Mar 18, 8:29 PM
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    Doozergirl
    • #7
    • 11th Mar 18, 8:29 PM
    • #7
    • 11th Mar 18, 8:29 PM
    Your proper survey should highlight it if the surveyor felt it was significant. The solicitor doesn't see the room nor do they understand building regs, particularly. Your vendor has answered the question in a way that should satisy a solicitor but it's your surveyor's job to understand the building.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • davidmcn
    • By davidmcn 11th Mar 18, 8:36 PM
    • 7,670 Posts
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    davidmcn
    • #8
    • 11th Mar 18, 8:36 PM
    • #8
    • 11th Mar 18, 8:36 PM
    Wouldn't hurt to ask them to explain why they think it's exempt. Often surprisingly trivial works aren't exempt.
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 11th Mar 18, 8:50 PM
    • 25,025 Posts
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    Doozergirl
    • #9
    • 11th Mar 18, 8:50 PM
    • #9
    • 11th Mar 18, 8:50 PM
    Wouldn't hurt to ask them to explain why they think it's exempt. Often surprisingly trivial works aren't exempt.
    Originally posted by davidmcn
    They answered it. "Non load bearing"
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • davidmcn
    • By davidmcn 11th Mar 18, 9:30 PM
    • 7,670 Posts
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    davidmcn
    They answered it. "Non load bearing"
    Originally posted by Doozergirl
    Is it really as straightforward as that? Admittedly I'm more used to the (different but similar) Scottish regulations, but building regulations cover things like insulation and fire safety, so removing a wall may have implications beyond whether it's load-bearing.

    And that's assuming it really was non-load-bearing!
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 11th Mar 18, 10:07 PM
    • 25,025 Posts
    • 68,505 Thanks
    Doozergirl
    Is it really as straightforward as that? Admittedly I'm more used to the (different but similar) Scottish regulations, but building regulations cover things like insulation and fire safety, so removing a wall may have implications beyond whether it's load-bearing.

    And that's assuming it really was non-load-bearing!
    Originally posted by davidmcn
    If you ask them again, you'll get the same reply. On the face of it, it's a perfectly adequate response and the vendor has volunteered this info.

    There are many more situations where removing a non-load bearing wall would be exempt (two storey house) than where it isn't (perhaps in a three storey house where fire regs apply and a hallway is involved) and so it may well be fine.

    It is ultimately a surveyor's job to check the house, provided they have been appointed. Questioning the vendor more isn't going to answer anything if the initial answer isn't trusted.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • Mackemadam
    • By Mackemadam 11th Mar 18, 10:14 PM
    • 3 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    Mackemadam
    Surveyors responsible, and they usually pick up on it as they can be sued for damages if picked up on later. I wouldn't worry too much about it as you don't have to
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