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    • Clairabella
    • By Clairabella 11th Mar 18, 2:53 PM
    • 208Posts
    • 73Thanks
    Clairabella
    Unsolvable gas fire smell.
    • #1
    • 11th Mar 18, 2:53 PM
    Unsolvable gas fire smell. 11th Mar 18 at 2:53 PM
    Almost a year ago we had a Gazco Logic, balanced flue gas fire installed, along with a new, limestone, fireplace in our timber framed house. The fire had to be a 'slimline' one due to the depth of the cavity.

    The fire gives off an unpleasant smell after about twenty minutes being on high. The fitters and Gazco have both been to the fire numerous times. Initially we were istructed to repeat a burn off, this we tried with the windows open and the fire on full for eleven hours. The fire was replaced with a factory tested, smell free, fire but this has not resolved the problem. The box they built around the fire has been replaced with an even more insulated one. The mantle of the fireplace has been replaced with a solid piece of limestone in case was smell from glue. None of these have resolved the issue.

    We are at a loss what to do now. The fireplace supplier has offered to replace the fire with an electric one but I really prefer a gas fire for both running cost and aesthetics. Other houses on this estate (built 1992) have similar fires with no issues.

    It's hard to describe a smell, it's not pleasant, similar to the initial burn off smell and it is not carbon monoxide though I don't know if it is toxic or not. I'm wondering if anyone else has had this issue or has any suggestions.
Page 1
    • billn
    • By billn 11th Mar 18, 9:03 PM
    • 119 Posts
    • 52 Thanks
    billn
    • #2
    • 11th Mar 18, 9:03 PM
    • #2
    • 11th Mar 18, 9:03 PM
    I know this is no help to you but please update if you get an answer, you seem to have a similar situation to us ours is a Gazco gas log effect burner.

    We have found that the smell (which is seems like a chemical type smell) only lasts about 10 minutes, we don't use the fire very often but when we do the smell tends to get less and less the more we have the fire on.

    I have come the possible conclution that it may be the sealer that has been used on the limestone but this is just a guess.
    Last edited by billn; 11-03-2018 at 9:08 PM.
    If at first you don't succeed, sky diving is not for you!
    • Clairabella
    • By Clairabella 12th Mar 18, 12:58 PM
    • 208 Posts
    • 73 Thanks
    Clairabella
    • #3
    • 12th Mar 18, 12:58 PM
    • #3
    • 12th Mar 18, 12:58 PM
    I know this is no help to you but please update if you get an answer, you seem to have a similar situation to us ours is a Gazco gas log effect burner.

    I have come the possible conclution that it may be the sealer that has been used on the limestone but this is just a guess.
    Originally posted by billn
    We actually had the top of the limestone fireplace replaced in case the smell was from any glues or sealant used. We now have a solid limestone fire surround but still have the smell.
    • billn
    • By billn 12th Mar 18, 3:16 PM
    • 119 Posts
    • 52 Thanks
    billn
    • #4
    • 12th Mar 18, 3:16 PM
    • #4
    • 12th Mar 18, 3:16 PM
    Ours is a solid limestone surround its the only thing I can think that is causing the smell, we haven't had anybody look at ours mainly because it started over a year after it had been fitted.
    If at first you don't succeed, sky diving is not for you!
    • Frank99
    • By Frank99 12th Mar 18, 5:09 PM
    • 69 Posts
    • 6 Thanks
    Frank99
    • #5
    • 12th Mar 18, 5:09 PM
    • #5
    • 12th Mar 18, 5:09 PM
    Get a Carbon monoxide detector just to make sure there is non in the room.
    Enjoy everyday like it's your last!
    • Clairabella
    • By Clairabella 12th Mar 18, 6:25 PM
    • 208 Posts
    • 73 Thanks
    Clairabella
    • #6
    • 12th Mar 18, 6:25 PM
    • #6
    • 12th Mar 18, 6:25 PM
    Thanks. Both the fitter and the Gazco engineer tested the air (negatively) for carbon monoxide but, I agree, we should get one anyway.
    • Furts
    • By Furts 13th Mar 18, 8:03 AM
    • 4,241 Posts
    • 2,746 Thanks
    Furts
    • #7
    • 13th Mar 18, 8:03 AM
    • #7
    • 13th Mar 18, 8:03 AM
    I owned a pre 1992 house and it too had smells coming from the gas fire. The solution was painful - either live with it or get remedial works done to the chimney which would have meant an insulated flue liner being installed in the chimney.

    In theory the house had been built to receive the fire but in reality it did not work like this. The reason was the chimney construction was cold, and the heat losses and poor insulation in the home made matters worse. After the fire had been switched on the chimney would gradually heat up and the smells would start to dissipate. Which meant using the fire on maximum whether the heat was wanted or not.

    Your home is an early generation timber frame so alarm bells ring. If built in Scotland your home may be OK, but if in say in Southern England I wonder about the chimney detailing. Regardless, it is likely that your insulation is woeful by current standards.
    • Clairabella
    • By Clairabella 13th Mar 18, 12:52 PM
    • 208 Posts
    • 73 Thanks
    Clairabella
    • #8
    • 13th Mar 18, 12:52 PM
    • #8
    • 13th Mar 18, 12:52 PM
    I owned a pre 1992 house and it too had smells coming from the gas fire. The solution was painful - either live with it or get remedial works done to the chimney which would have meant an insulated flue liner being installed in the chimney.

    In theory the house had been built to receive the fire but in reality it did not work like this. The reason was the chimney construction was cold, and the heat losses and poor insulation in the home made matters worse. After the fire had been switched on the chimney would gradually heat up and the smells would start to dissipate. Which meant using the fire on maximum whether the heat was wanted or not.

    Your home is an early generation timber frame so alarm bells ring. If built in Scotland your home may be OK, but if in say in Southern England I wonder about the chimney detailing. Regardless, it is likely that your insulation is woeful by current standards.
    Originally posted by Furts
    Thanks Furts. We are in NE Lancs. Our builder did actually receive an award for the energy saving features in the house so hopefully it is well insulated though, I agree, perhaps not up to current standards. We do not, however, have a chimney. The fire vents straight out of the wall through the integral flue.

    Something is getting hot and giving off fumes be it within the fire or the cavity, I am hoping someone else may have managed to solve this problem and can enlighten me.
    • George Michael
    • By George Michael 13th Mar 18, 12:54 PM
    • 3,056 Posts
    • 4,135 Thanks
    George Michael
    • #9
    • 13th Mar 18, 12:54 PM
    • #9
    • 13th Mar 18, 12:54 PM
    I realise that it's no help but at least you seem to have chosen a company that offers very good service and isn't trying to dodge the issue.
    • Furts
    • By Furts 13th Mar 18, 6:04 PM
    • 4,241 Posts
    • 2,746 Thanks
    Furts
    Thanks Furts. We are in NE Lancs. Our builder did actually receive an award for the energy saving features in the house so hopefully it is well insulated though, I agree, perhaps not up to current standards. We do not, however, have a chimney. The fire vents straight out of the wall through the integral flue.

    Something is getting hot and giving off fumes be it within the fire or the cavity, I am hoping someone else may have managed to solve this problem and can enlighten me.
    Originally posted by Clairabella

    A long shot, but might your flue positioned be exposed and cold? Are there strong winds, or drafts pushing the flue gas back into the fire? Are these drafts getting up into your cavity and causing a cold spot? Is the flue fully sealed around and into the walls and insulated where it passes through the cavity?


    It would be prudent to carefully check these items, if nothing else so you can rule them out. Then logically if they are ruled out then a finger of blame could be directed at the fire.
    • Clairabella
    • By Clairabella 14th Mar 18, 1:18 PM
    • 208 Posts
    • 73 Thanks
    Clairabella
    Thanks again Furts. The fitters are open to any suggestions as they are completely out of ideas how to rectify the issue. I'll mention this to them.
    • Furts
    • By Furts 14th Mar 18, 1:35 PM
    • 4,241 Posts
    • 2,746 Thanks
    Furts
    Covering all bases ... you do not have a chimney so I assume your flue is passing through an everyday timber frame panel. Around your fire will be a margin of wall covered by the fire surround. This could be drilled say with a Starrit cutter and you could see if any insulation is present in your timber framed house. Do a patch over afterwards but it does not have to be super finished - it will be hidden.

    It is not unheard for the insulation to be missing - it speeds up the build, it is horrible stuff to put in (think fibreglass or Rockwool), and frequently nobody checks on this.

    If it is a cold wall then the flue will also be cold and also the back of the fire.
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