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  • FIRST POST
    • Spender£
    • By Spender£ 11th Mar 18, 10:47 AM
    • 52Posts
    • 3Thanks
    Spender£
    Good starter drill for D.I.Y?
    • #1
    • 11th Mar 18, 10:47 AM
    Good starter drill for D.I.Y? 11th Mar 18 at 10:47 AM
    I am useless a D.I.Y in fact i don't have the first clue on how to hang a curtain rail, i would love to be able to do these simple jobs without having to ask someone else all the time.
    I understand that most basic D.I.Y tasks need a drill.
    Does anybody know a good drill or tools to get started in this area, i know how to do certain things like build a wall, clean the guttering etc but nothing involving use of a drill, any ideas?

    I would love to know how to fit locks and bolts to doors, hang curtain rail, assemble a new shed etc.
    Time Is The Enemy!
Page 1
    • Ruski
    • By Ruski 11th Mar 18, 11:18 AM
    • 1,517 Posts
    • 891 Thanks
    Ruski
    • #2
    • 11th Mar 18, 11:18 AM
    • #2
    • 11th Mar 18, 11:18 AM
    This is an absolute bargain for your first drill as it includes a good array of accessories.

    There will be people who say you need an SDS drill -
    you can if you want, but 90% of my business is done with this kit.

    HTH

    Russ

    https://www.toolstation.com/shop/Power+Tools/d40/18V+Drills/sd2789/Bosch+GSB+18-2-LI+18V+Li-Ion+Cordless+Combi+Drill+%26+35+Piece+Accessory+Ki t/p31102
    Perfection takes time: don't expect miracles in a day
    • Le_Kirk
    • By Le_Kirk 11th Mar 18, 11:24 AM
    • 2,676 Posts
    • 1,545 Thanks
    Le_Kirk
    • #3
    • 11th Mar 18, 11:24 AM
    • #3
    • 11th Mar 18, 11:24 AM
    You could do worse than start with this one. Other makes and types are available but this is a rechargeable one and is 18 volts. Having a good drill does not make one a good DIYer and you will still be wise to practice where it doesn't matter (too much) in case you make mistakes. It is also important to choose the correct drill bits for the job you are trying to do, for example, drilling into wood to mount your curtain rail onto a batten, drilling into plaster, breeze block or brick, for fitting rawl plugs to mount your batten onto a wall or drilling a hole in a steel bracket. Good luck and enjoy that moment when your first successful DIY job is competed satisfactorily.

    ETA or that one posted above by Russ, it's a good make (Bosch) and is 18 volt and comes with a set of drill bits.
    Last edited by Le_Kirk; 11-03-2018 at 11:26 AM. Reason: Add info
    • Owain Moneysaver
    • By Owain Moneysaver 11th Mar 18, 12:59 PM
    • 8,062 Posts
    • 8,910 Thanks
    Owain Moneysaver
    • #4
    • 11th Mar 18, 12:59 PM
    • #4
    • 11th Mar 18, 12:59 PM
    Hanging a curtain rail is not a simple job - a lot depends on what sort of lintel is present above the window and even professionals can have a nasty surprise when the wall starts falling apart :-)

    Personally I would go with a ~ 50 mains SDS drill (Screwfix Titan or similar own-brand is fine) for masonry work, and a 30 cordless drill for small woodwork and screwdriving.

    With care and a chuck adapter the SDS can be used for morticing out lock slots etc.

    If you have a timber frame house or need to work outside or away from mains power then the more powerful cordless drills are worthwhile.
    A kind word lasts a minute, a skelped erse is sair for a day.
    • brightontraveller
    • By brightontraveller 11th Mar 18, 1:00 PM
    • 1,352 Posts
    • 526 Thanks
    brightontraveller
    • #5
    • 11th Mar 18, 1:00 PM
    • #5
    • 11th Mar 18, 1:00 PM
    I would say get SDS Plus corded( mains powered) Drill look for Drill with , Hammer Drill & Chisel Single-Speed, Variable & Reverse drill, Impact Energy: about 2.J preferably higher (80 -150), it will cope with anything diyer or most trades can through at it you can add all the attachments that you can use with cordless and more..
    https://www.screwfix.com/p/bosch-gbh-2000-corded-sds-plus-drill-240v/87453

    https://www.screwfix.com/p/bosch-gbh-2-24-d-corded-sds-plus-drill-240v/61945
    I see so many people with cordless drills most aren!!!8217;t up to anything other than screwing screws they fail miserably drilling walls, chiselling out etc unless you wish to spend 300+
    • Jonesya
    • By Jonesya 11th Mar 18, 3:39 PM
    • 1,436 Posts
    • 885 Thanks
    Jonesya
    • #6
    • 11th Mar 18, 3:39 PM
    • #6
    • 11th Mar 18, 3:39 PM
    Trouble with battery drills is that the batteries will have failed long before you've worn out the drill and the replacements often cost as much or more than a new drill. And they gradually discharge, so if left on the shelf they'll be dead when you come to use it.

    That's why if you're only doing DIY occasionally a good mains drill is better, get a percussion drill and you can drill timber, plaster, brick and do most basic DIY tasks.

    Sds drills are great, if you're drilling concrete and brick, drilling through a wall or using core drills but they're normally bigger, heavy and not really suitable for many smaller jobs plus you need adaptors for normal hss drill bits.

    If you're only buying one drill, I'd say a mains percussion drill.
    • Ruski
    • By Ruski 11th Mar 18, 5:07 PM
    • 1,517 Posts
    • 891 Thanks
    Ruski
    • #7
    • 11th Mar 18, 5:07 PM
    • #7
    • 11th Mar 18, 5:07 PM
    Trouble with battery drills is that the batteries will have failed long before you've worn out the drill and the replacements often cost as much or more than a new drill. And they gradually discharge, so if left on the shelf they'll be dead when you come to use it.

    That's why if you're only doing DIY occasionally a good mains drill is better, get a percussion drill and you can drill timber, plaster, brick and do most basic DIY tasks.

    Sds drills are great, if you're drilling concrete and brick, drilling through a wall or using core drills but they're normally bigger, heavy and not really suitable for many smaller jobs plus you need adaptors for normal hss drill bits.

    If you're only buying one drill, I'd say a mains percussion drill.
    Originally posted by Jonesya
    OP's original quote has asked for a suitable tool for the job - the ones that I and Le-Kirk have suggested are perfect for the job of both internal and external (building a shed).

    LiIon batteries do not discharge whilst sat on the shelf, and if they do - these batteries are fully charged in less than an hour - two batteries = no down time.

    Been doing this for 15 years now, I have a corded drill in the van, and that's exactly where it's stayed, not used it for years.
    Even my corded SDS only gets used for core drilling 4" holes!

    OP - take heed of advice from those in the trade - everyone has their own 'favoured' brands, but the technology of today far surpasses anything of even a few years ago

    HTH

    Russ
    Perfection takes time: don't expect miracles in a day
    • Norman Castle
    • By Norman Castle 11th Mar 18, 7:58 PM
    • 6,962 Posts
    • 5,727 Thanks
    Norman Castle
    • #8
    • 11th Mar 18, 7:58 PM
    • #8
    • 11th Mar 18, 7:58 PM
    take heed of advice from those in the trade
    150 cordless drills are worthwhile for trade use but for diy work they are unnecessary. A 50 green Bosch will easily match that cordless and won't need to be binned when the batteries fail.
    Drills bought for diy will spend 99.9+% of their life in the cupboard.

    OP, How much are you expecting to spend?
    Last edited by Norman Castle; 11-03-2018 at 8:07 PM.
    Don't harass a hippie. You'll get bad karma.

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    • ashe
    • By ashe 11th Mar 18, 9:27 PM
    • 530 Posts
    • 367 Thanks
    ashe
    • #9
    • 11th Mar 18, 9:27 PM
    • #9
    • 11th Mar 18, 9:27 PM
    150 cordless drills are worthwhile for trade use but for diy work they are unnecessary. A 50 green Bosch will easily match that cordless and won't need to be binned when the batteries fail.
    Drills bought for diy will spend 99.9+% of their life in the cupboard.

    OP, How much are you expecting to spend?
    Originally posted by Norman Castle
    I have an Aldi cordless Drill with some Dewalt bits and to be honest it has been fine for every DIY project I have done. It cost me 24.
    • Gloomendoom
    • By Gloomendoom 11th Mar 18, 10:55 PM
    • 13,960 Posts
    • 18,381 Thanks
    Gloomendoom
    This is an absolute bargain for your first drill as it includes a good array of accessories.

    There will be people who say you need an SDS drill -
    you can if you want, but 90% of my business is done with this kit.

    HTH

    Russ

    https://www.toolstation.com/shop/Power+Tools/d40/18V+Drills/sd2789/Bosch+GSB+18-2-LI+18V+Li-Ion+Cordless+Combi+Drill+%26+35+Piece+Accessory+Ki t/p31102
    Originally posted by Ruski
    Good value but you need spend an additional 50 on a charger. 200 all in.
    Never argue with stupid people, they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience. - Mark Twain
    • Ruski
    • By Ruski 11th Mar 18, 11:11 PM
    • 1,517 Posts
    • 891 Thanks
    Ruski
    Good value but you need spend an additional 50 on a charger. 200 all in.
    Originally posted by Gloomendoom
    Charger included
    Perfection takes time: don't expect miracles in a day
    • getmore4less
    • By getmore4less 11th Mar 18, 11:52 PM
    • 32,035 Posts
    • 19,223 Thanks
    getmore4less
    Often you need one to make the holes and one to put in the fixings for real convenience.

    A compact drill/driver is probably the most used time saving tool and will manage the smaller holes in most of the softer stuff.
    • Head The Ball
    • By Head The Ball 12th Mar 18, 3:12 PM
    • 3,235 Posts
    • 8,508 Thanks
    Head The Ball
    Good starter drill for D.I.Y?
    My first drill was a cheap Black and Decker about 35 years ago.

    That lasted 30 years during which time it saw quite a lot of varied service in my house.

    When it failed 5 years ago I replaced it with a cheap under 20 corded drill from Tesco. That has coped with all the jobs I have needed it for, albeit there haven't been that many.

    Unless you plan to do a lot of drilling, or need a heavy duty drill, then I suggest that you buy something like this for under 20 and see how you get in with it.

    Check out Lidl and Aldi etc too. They often have inexpensive DIY drills in stock.

    If it only lasts a few years then buy another. You will never spend as much as some of the 150 to 200 drills above.

    Cheap drills won't last for ever and won't cope with heavy use but they are adequate for most small DIY jobs.

    Maybe go a bit higher than 20 but I don't think you need to go over maybe 40 to 50.

    My opinion, others may not agree.
    Last edited by Head The Ball; 12-03-2018 at 4:38 PM. Reason: typos
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    it is probably you.
    • Grenage
    • By Grenage 12th Mar 18, 3:19 PM
    • 1,434 Posts
    • 1,337 Thanks
    Grenage
    I have the 4mah version of the drill that Ruski mentioned, and it's brilliant. I use it for 99% of my driving/drilling. I have a corded Bosch SDS for the tougher jobs, which is about twice a year.
    • benjus
    • By benjus 12th Mar 18, 4:43 PM
    • 5,118 Posts
    • 3,155 Thanks
    benjus
    I've had the same drill for about 15 years. It's a basic corded non-SDS hammer drill with a keyed chuck that I bought from Wickes for under 20. Looks similar to this one from Argos: http://www.argos.co.uk/product/7106062

    It's got me through countless DIY jobs in those 15 years - I've put up shelves, heavy mirrors, bathroom cabinets, TV brackets, curtain rails and various other things onto various types of wall. I've used it for all sorts of woodworking projects. When used with some half-decent drill bits I've never had a problem drilling into any of the materials I've needed to drill into. Most of the work I do is indoors so having a corded drill hasn't really been a problem. An extension lead is a handy thing to have anyway, and connecting it up only adds a couple of minutes to the overall job time.

    I'm sure the 150 drill would do you very nicely. But do you need to spend that much for DIY use? Certainly not.
    Let's settle this like gentlemen: armed with heavy sticks
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    • getmore4less
    • By getmore4less 12th Mar 18, 5:24 PM
    • 32,035 Posts
    • 19,223 Thanks
    getmore4less
    As above(s). I still have my B&D corded from the 80s.

    that could be a good compromise a corded drill + extension lead and a cordless drill/driver.

    Put the extra towards quality bits and other tools like power saws when you need them
    • Aylesbury Duck
    • By Aylesbury Duck 12th Mar 18, 6:23 PM
    • 1,868 Posts
    • 2,506 Thanks
    Aylesbury Duck
    As above. I have had years of DIY use from a mains drill that cost me about 30. It has hammer action, a keyless chuck, reverse mode and variable speed control. I have always invested my money in decent quality drill bits that have lasted ages and have worked in all sorts of materials including some very tough walls and lintels.
    Please forgive the deliberate omission of apostrophes on some posts whilst I await MSE to do something about the daft codes that appear in their place when typing on certain devices.
    • Norman Castle
    • By Norman Castle 12th Mar 18, 6:55 PM
    • 6,962 Posts
    • 5,727 Thanks
    Norman Castle
    I replaced a basic Black and Decker hammer drill with a slightly better Skil drill for 14 when Do it All closed down. It won't drill into concrete but I've only needed to do that once so hardly a problem.
    The biggest difference between the old and new drill is the variable speed giving a soft start. This makes the drill much easier to use especially for a novice.
    Don't harass a hippie. You'll get bad karma.

    Never trust a newbie with a rtb tale.
    • getmore4less
    • By getmore4less 14th Mar 18, 10:36 AM
    • 32,035 Posts
    • 19,223 Thanks
    getmore4less
    Another thing that I think is a good buy when you find them reduces are the large kits of bits and drills

    they won't be quality but having a range of sizes to tackle the one off holes is really handy.

    You back these up with quality ones that cost close to the same each as a kit for the regular jobs as you realise which ones you need.

    Also start to be on the lookout for discounted end of line quality bits drills and fixings to build up a DIY stash.

    screwfix often dump fixings on clearance real cheap.

    clamps and a portable workbench are good accessories for DIY.
    • getmore4less
    • By getmore4less 14th Mar 18, 11:19 AM
    • 32,035 Posts
    • 19,223 Thanks
    getmore4less
    Also if things like curtain rails are on your list then a level of some kind is an essential member of the tool kit.
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