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  • FIRST POST
    • hottdang1
    • By hottdang1 11th Mar 18, 10:14 AM
    • 54Posts
    • 3Thanks
    hottdang1
    home study degree in UK - any experience?
    • #1
    • 11th Mar 18, 10:14 AM
    home study degree in UK - any experience? 11th Mar 18 at 10:14 AM
    morning folks

    I'm looking to studying for a psychology degree & want to do this part time & home based as I have a full time job which includes travel plus have a family
    - In addition to not living anywhere near a university

    Research shows me there are distance learning centres & student loans available etc so just asking if anyone else has gone down this route - how did it work out, are any institutions are better than others, anything else to have on the radar

    obviously the subject material of the degree isn't so important - I just want to understand the overall process better and anything to watch for


    thanks
Page 1
    • kickingk50
    • By kickingk50 11th Mar 18, 10:55 AM
    • 40 Posts
    • 13 Thanks
    kickingk50
    • #2
    • 11th Mar 18, 10:55 AM
    • #2
    • 11th Mar 18, 10:55 AM
    Hi,

    I'm currently studying for a Psychology degree with the Open University.It is very flexible and I would recommend it for anyone who works as well.You study 1 or 2 modules each year(Oct to May/June).but they only recommend you take 1 per year as it can be quite intense.(I did 2 last year,at level 1 but I wasn't working),I'm only doing 1 this year.(level 2)
    If you study part time(i.e 1 module per year) it will take you 6 years to complete the degree.
    Go on their website,it gives all the information you need.

    Good luck!!
    • happyandcontented
    • By happyandcontented 11th Mar 18, 11:11 AM
    • 1,115 Posts
    • 2,164 Thanks
    happyandcontented
    • #3
    • 11th Mar 18, 11:11 AM
    • #3
    • 11th Mar 18, 11:11 AM
    I second the OU it is a very professional and respected organisation and their degrees are well accepted by employers,
    • BrassicWoman
    • By BrassicWoman 11th Mar 18, 11:18 AM
    • 1,636 Posts
    • 6,782 Thanks
    BrassicWoman
    • #4
    • 11th Mar 18, 11:18 AM
    • #4
    • 11th Mar 18, 11:18 AM
    I did an online masters with Edinburgh and now doing a doctorate at Lancaster. I've also studied at the OU, and at bricks and mortar. Not a lot of difference between them for distance learning. Go with the course that sounds most interesting as you're on your own a good deal!

    \Have you had a look at psychology careers? not as exciting as you would hope....
    Jan 18 grocery challenge 105.13/ 150
    • Sncjw
    • By Sncjw 11th Mar 18, 11:24 AM
    • 1,832 Posts
    • 1,087 Thanks
    Sncjw
    • #5
    • 11th Mar 18, 11:24 AM
    • #5
    • 11th Mar 18, 11:24 AM
    With any uni it will be a lot of self study anyways so if ou is right for you it probably wouldn!!!8217;t be much difference.

    You do have to be more self motivated as your doing it part time and you could say to yourself oh il so it another day
    • GothicStirling
    • By GothicStirling 11th Mar 18, 12:01 PM
    • 1,065 Posts
    • 790 Thanks
    GothicStirling
    • #6
    • 11th Mar 18, 12:01 PM
    • #6
    • 11th Mar 18, 12:01 PM
    What's the motivation for studying psychology? If you have thoughts of becoming a practioner, make sure its BPS Accredited. I've just discounted the OU's MSc in Psychology because it wasn't accredited.
    • Manxman in exile
    • By Manxman in exile 11th Mar 18, 5:22 PM
    • 1,475 Posts
    • 1,117 Thanks
    Manxman in exile
    • #7
    • 11th Mar 18, 5:22 PM
    • #7
    • 11th Mar 18, 5:22 PM
    morning folks

    I'm looking to studying for a psychology degree & want to do this part time & home based as I have a full time job which includes travel plus have a family
    - In addition to not living anywhere near a university

    Research shows me there are distance learning centres & student loans available etc so just asking if anyone else has gone down this route - how did it work out, are any institutions are better than others, anything else to have on the radar

    obviously the subject material of the degree isn't so important - I just want to understand the overall process better and anything to watch for


    thanks
    Originally posted by hottdang1

    Eh? surely the subject is all important! What do you want to achieve?


    I worked in a mental health trust and the clinical psychologists were the best paid staff after consultant psychiatrists. but you had to have a doctorate after your first degree. you can also go into educational psychology and what I think is called "Industrial" psychology. All well rewarded jobs if you can get them.


    But I wonder if psychology is seen by many as a bit of a "soft" option and not a good career choice?


    If you know you want psychology as a career choice then go with it. But if you want to "improve" yourself intellectually, think about other subjects to make you "think" better. Philosophy, law, even something like theology - but learn to think for yourself and to understand arguments and evidence - that's the important thing! (And we miss it all too often in this country...)


    Even studying economics might be a good choice - but you'd have to remember there are no properly controlled experiments, it's not science, and mostly value judgements!
    • hottdang1
    • By hottdang1 11th Mar 18, 5:44 PM
    • 54 Posts
    • 3 Thanks
    hottdang1
    • #8
    • 11th Mar 18, 5:44 PM
    • #8
    • 11th Mar 18, 5:44 PM
    Thanks for the replies

    Just on the comment re subject material - I didn!!!8217;t mean not important to me (it is of course !!!55357;!!!56842
    I meant in the context of feedback into the matter home study

    For the poster about psychology jobs not being some interesting - could you elaborate please? Is that from personal experience? Are you in such a role?
    • Manxman in exile
    • By Manxman in exile 11th Mar 18, 6:40 PM
    • 1,475 Posts
    • 1,117 Thanks
    Manxman in exile
    • #9
    • 11th Mar 18, 6:40 PM
    • #9
    • 11th Mar 18, 6:40 PM
    I would repeat from my post #7 what are you trying to achieve from a psychology degree?


    It's a popular subject and there's a large supply of psychology graduates. (To get a good career out of it you probably need a doctorate).


    What are you looking for?
    • BorisThomson
    • By BorisThomson 11th Mar 18, 6:48 PM
    • 1,586 Posts
    • 3,426 Thanks
    BorisThomson
    Do you already have a degree OP?

    This, along with Manxman's questions about what you are looking to achieve, are important in determining what your best options might be.
    • Manxman in exile
    • By Manxman in exile 11th Mar 18, 7:12 PM
    • 1,475 Posts
    • 1,117 Thanks
    Manxman in exile
    Do you already have a degree OP?

    This, along with Manxman's questions about what you are looking to achieve, are important in determining what your best options might be.
    Originally posted by BorisThomson

    Boris - I turned 60 in January (retired a few years ago) and I still don't know what I want to do when I grow up! (And my wife would confirm I am not a grown up...)


    When I was 18 I started a law degree at a poly. It was a really good education (as I've posted elsewhere we had good lecturers who knew their subject) but I've never "used" the degree. But it did teach me to follow, understand and construct arguments. And that has always helped me in my work.


    I also remember discussing this with a NHS HR manager and we both wondered if we should have done psychology degrees and doctorates. They were very well paid at that time- but not so much now. They've almost all been downgraded at my old trust.
    • surfboard2
    • By surfboard2 12th Mar 18, 11:59 AM
    • 1,949 Posts
    • 48,359 Thanks
    surfboard2
    I'm currently pursuing an MSc with SOAS through the University of London International Programmes.

    I considered things like the reputation of the university/distance learning programme, how much study time is expected (there is a more intense version of my course which i would not have been able to manage,) how the course is set up in terms of coursework/exams and if it is a brick and mortar university with a distance learning programme, how does this reflect on the degree certificate e.t.c

    I too work full time, and so spend an hour or two reading most weekdays after work and then a good chunk of my weekends.

    I've only been at it for a month so will see how things go but very much enjoy the flexibility it has afforded me.
    • Sanne
    • By Sanne 12th Mar 18, 10:02 PM
    • 349 Posts
    • 315 Thanks
    Sanne
    I have studied online with the university of Derby - they have a separate online school so the support is great as it!!!8217;s all dedicated to online students. Didn!!!8217;t do psychology (IT so very different) but all their psychology courses are accredited if you do the residential week. If you don!!!8217;t need accreditation that!!!8217;s possible too.

    They also offer an attractive payment scheme (monthly instalments) while many others want the module fee or more upfront if you don!!!8217;t want to take out a student loan. (Wasn!!!8217;t an option when I studied but also didn!!!8217;t want the interest, as a higher rate tax payer the re-payments would have been sizeable anyway).

    Access to online study and research materials was great and you can use your nearest university library (though never done this). I!!!8217;ve done two modules at a time while working full-time which was do-able.
    Last edited by Sanne; 12-03-2018 at 10:05 PM.
    • elsien
    • By elsien 12th Mar 18, 10:11 PM
    • 16,565 Posts
    • 41,814 Thanks
    elsien
    A psychology degree in itself doesn't really qualify you for anything any more so than any general degree. For careers such as clinical or educational psychology you would need to go on to do further training.
    Technically, anyone can call themselves a psychologist and set themselves up in a business - doesn't mean they know what they're talking about.

    Have you chosen psychology for any specific reason?
    All shall be well, and all shall be well, and all manner of things shall be well.

    Pedant alert - it's could have, not could of.
    • Manxman in exile
    • By Manxman in exile 13th Mar 18, 4:01 PM
    • 1,475 Posts
    • 1,117 Thanks
    Manxman in exile
    A psychology degree in itself doesn't really qualify you for anything any more so than any general degree. For careers such as clinical or educational psychology you would need to go on to do further training.
    Technically, anyone can call themselves a psychologist and set themselves up in a business - doesn't mean they know what they're talking about.

    Have you chosen psychology for any specific reason?
    Originally posted by elsien

    All correct. If the OP wants to study psychology for career purposes, they are unlikely to get anywhere without a higher degree - probably a Doctorate. And that's probably at least another three years full time.


    I think UEA used to provide a clinical doctorate in psychology that could be done in two years, but I know it was a "rigorous" course.
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