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  • FIRST POST
    • jolester
    • By jolester 9th Mar 18, 1:26 PM
    • 261Posts
    • 82Thanks
    jolester
    Knock down and start again
    • #1
    • 9th Mar 18, 1:26 PM
    Knock down and start again 9th Mar 18 at 1:26 PM
    Hi,

    I have searched this board and only found one post from 2014 asking a similar ish question to mine

    We are in the process of buying our next property and we are hoping that extending it will be no issue as it is set in it's own 3 acre plot, not listed and all the surrounding houses have had extensions already done to them.

    This is an older cottage which we were originally planning on just extending and modernising inside but from looking through the Grand Designs site last night we've decided we do actually prefer more contemporary, individual architecturally designed properties (there will be nothing around us that would offer this kind of property within our budget and with the land which is more important to us than the design of the house)

    So, our ponderings are now as to whether completely knocking down and rebuilding the house to a preferred external design is something that is "the norm" as in do planning departments generally allow it and is it something that we would have to change our mortgage to do?

    Any advice appreciated as to whether we should pop this pipe dream into a box and close the lid or is it worth exploring further

    Thank you
Page 1
    • Head The Ball
    • By Head The Ball 9th Mar 18, 1:33 PM
    • 3,277 Posts
    • 8,586 Thanks
    Head The Ball
    • #2
    • 9th Mar 18, 1:33 PM
    • #2
    • 9th Mar 18, 1:33 PM
    I suggest that you contact your local planning department and ask them.

    They should know the local rules and regulations better than anyone on here.
    Every Village has its Idiot.

    If you don't know who your Village Idiot is

    it is probably you.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 9th Mar 18, 2:16 PM
    • 25,283 Posts
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    Davesnave
    • #3
    • 9th Mar 18, 2:16 PM
    • #3
    • 9th Mar 18, 2:16 PM
    They are more amenable to this if the design is considered to be of particular architectural merit, or especially in keeping with the landscape, but these are value judgements, not easy to define in straightforward, everyday terms.

    Perhaps a meeting with a local planning consultant would be a good first move.
    If you are finding huge gaps between your paragraphs and use Firefox, MSE know about the problem. However, they aren't necessarily doing anything about it yet....
    https://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.php?t=5844460
    • jolester
    • By jolester 9th Mar 18, 2:20 PM
    • 261 Posts
    • 82 Thanks
    jolester
    • #4
    • 9th Mar 18, 2:20 PM
    • #4
    • 9th Mar 18, 2:20 PM
    They are more amenable to this if the design is considered to be of particular architectural merit, or especially in keeping with the landscape, but these are value judgements, not easy to define in straightforward, everyday terms.

    Perhaps a meeting with a local planning consultant would be a good first move.
    Originally posted by Davesnave
    I wouldn't say it would be in keeping with the landscape... think that planning consultant meeting is the way forward - any ideas whether or not it would affect mortgage at all ?
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 9th Mar 18, 2:22 PM
    • 25,180 Posts
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    Doozergirl
    • #5
    • 9th Mar 18, 2:22 PM
    • #5
    • 9th Mar 18, 2:22 PM
    I with planning consultant rather than planning office at this point. It's likely to be complex and you need to take proper advice tailored to you taking the local plan into consideration. The planning office can't start helping you to size out what might be acceptable.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 9th Mar 18, 2:23 PM
    • 25,180 Posts
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    Doozergirl
    • #6
    • 9th Mar 18, 2:23 PM
    • #6
    • 9th Mar 18, 2:23 PM
    Yes, you will need a self build mortgage. No way will a regular mortgage be allowed for a house that is going to disappear
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • jolester
    • By jolester 9th Mar 18, 2:43 PM
    • 261 Posts
    • 82 Thanks
    jolester
    • #7
    • 9th Mar 18, 2:43 PM
    • #7
    • 9th Mar 18, 2:43 PM
    Yes, you will need a self build mortgage. No way will a regular mortgage be allowed for a house that is going to disappear
    Originally posted by Doozergirl
    Lol, thanks for the definitive answer ! It's stressful enough sorting a normal mortgage ... I think that has definitely made me decide to close the lid on the rebuild box !

    Thank you !
    • Owain Moneysaver
    • By Owain Moneysaver 9th Mar 18, 4:51 PM
    • 8,184 Posts
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    Owain Moneysaver
    • #8
    • 9th Mar 18, 4:51 PM
    • #8
    • 9th Mar 18, 4:51 PM
    Knocking down and rebuilding is the only way to obtain a plot in many areas. It can make a lot of sense as you end up with a house that is designed to flow as one building, rather than a mishmash of extensions, and built to modern building regs and your personal requirements.

    In many case though there's be a limit on how much bigger the new house can be compared to the existing.

    If the plot is big enough and suitably arranged for access you might be able to build your new house in the back garden before demolishing the old cottage.
    A kind word lasts a minute, a skelped erse is sair for a day.
    • jolester
    • By jolester 9th Mar 18, 5:01 PM
    • 261 Posts
    • 82 Thanks
    jolester
    • #9
    • 9th Mar 18, 5:01 PM
    • #9
    • 9th Mar 18, 5:01 PM
    Knocking down and rebuilding is the only way to obtain a plot in many areas. It can make a lot of sense as you end up with a house that is designed to flow as one building, rather than a mishmash of extensions, and built to modern building regs and your personal requirements.

    In many case though there's be a limit on how much bigger the new house can be compared to the existing.

    If the plot is big enough and suitably arranged for access you might be able to build your new house in the back garden before demolishing the old cottage.
    Originally posted by Owain Moneysaver
    Thanks for your post, the house itself isn't tiny, just a standard 3 bed cottage, I don't think it's "old" old, just older than our property! we'd like to knock the living room and dining room into one living room, add an extension to the back of this as a new dining room, knock the utility into the kitchen to make it bigger, add a new utility then extend the upstairs to match the below footprint...

    Though there is room to build another house elsewhere on the land the current house is standing in the ideal spot as there is a very large pool at one end of the land and we wouldn't want the house too close to this - or to take up all this grass, there is a driveway which can hold about 15 cars which we wouldn't want to grass over or move elsewhere
    • parking_question_chap
    • By parking_question_chap 9th Mar 18, 5:50 PM
    • 1,632 Posts
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    parking_question_chap
    Contact you local planning department, they might offer a pre application advice service. You pay a fee and you give them some sketches andd they tell you if it would likely get permission or not.

    Dont meet with a "consultant", meet with the people who will actually be making the decision, you could easily draw up some sketches and get some in principle advice.

    If its a total non starter then you will have saved money getting professional drawing done. If it could be looked at favourably then go straight to an architect and get the plans drawn up.
    Last edited by parking_question_chap; 09-03-2018 at 5:55 PM.
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 9th Mar 18, 10:59 PM
    • 25,180 Posts
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    Doozergirl
    Talking to a consultant doesn't mean drawings. It means proper advice.

    If I had listened to planning officers I would not have planning permission for a new dwelling.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • VfM4meplse
    • By VfM4meplse 10th Mar 18, 3:08 AM
    • 25,713 Posts
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    VfM4meplse
    3 acres....wow!!!

    Greed and lust = 2 of the deadly sins
    Value-for-money-for-me-puhleeze!

    "No man is worth, crawling on the earth"- adapted from Bob Crewe and Bob Gaudio

    Hope is not a strategy ...A child is for life, not just 18 years....Don't get me started on the NHS, because you won't win...If in doubt, don't pull out... I love chaz-ing!
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 10th Mar 18, 7:10 AM
    • 25,283 Posts
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    Davesnave
    3 acres....wow!!!

    Greed and lust = 2 of the deadly sins
    Originally posted by VfM4meplse
    Be careful! Acreage doesn't look after itself, so persons possessing greed or lust must either have deep pockets or no trace of sloth.
    If you are finding huge gaps between your paragraphs and use Firefox, MSE know about the problem. However, they aren't necessarily doing anything about it yet....
    https://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.php?t=5844460
    • jolester
    • By jolester 10th Mar 18, 9:26 AM
    • 261 Posts
    • 82 Thanks
    jolester
    Thank you all for your replies, it's certainly given us a lot to consider, we're going to the grand designs show show maybe find a consultant we're able to take the first step with there as well as contacting the local planning dept

    Regarding the mortgage, I'm guessing it's more expensive in the short term, but would that be a short term mortgage and you then revert back to a "normal" mortgage?

    And with the acreage, it's set out quite nicely so it's manageable, to the left is a large grassed area which is going to be secured for our dogs, then the parking and house is to the right, and then the rest is grass which is just mown with the sit on mower they're leaving and a big pool so hopefully not too much to challenge us, just plenty of space to put a nice outdoor cooking/eating area
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 10th Mar 18, 9:39 AM
    • 25,180 Posts
    • 68,785 Thanks
    Doozergirl
    Grand Designs in May or Homebuilding and Renovating this month?

    My other half and I are on the 'Ask the Experts' stand on the Saturday at HB&R. Fabulous renovation builders, not planning consultants though.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • jolester
    • By jolester 10th Mar 18, 9:54 AM
    • 261 Posts
    • 82 Thanks
    jolester
    Grand designs in may, and ideal home in march
    • parking_question_chap
    • By parking_question_chap 10th Mar 18, 11:45 AM
    • 1,632 Posts
    • 1,409 Thanks
    parking_question_chap
    Talking to a consultant doesn't mean drawings. It means proper advice.
    Originally posted by Doozergirl
    Such as.....
    • Waterlily24
    • By Waterlily24 10th Mar 18, 12:07 PM
    • 941 Posts
    • 497 Thanks
    Waterlily24
    We were in the same position a few years ago. Our plot was just over an acre though. No near neighbours and the plot was wide rather than long.
    Our council would only allow us to increase the footprint of the property by a third but a new build would have only been by a quarter. We decided to extend and after a lot of 'discussions' they finally allowed us to extend to make it a chalet bungalow rather than a bungalow. The bungalow was originally L shaped and the roof was so low that rooms couldn't have been built there. We squared the bungalow off and put an extension (Living room) on the other side. We now had a nice big roof space and were able to put 3 large bedrooms and a bathroom up there. The main bedroom is downstairs with an ensuite and the main bathroom is downstairs. I know some people don't like the bedrooms and bathrooms downstairs but it suits us well as it keeps it more like a bungalow. We don't have to bother much with the stairs lol.
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 10th Mar 18, 12:55 PM
    • 25,180 Posts
    • 68,785 Thanks
    Doozergirl
    Such as.....
    Originally posted by parking_question_chap
    How to play the planning game rather than running headlong with great positivity and ridiculous naievity into an uphill, losing battle with the planning department. There are two ways to approach planning and influence can play a huge part.

    I've learned an awful lot about planning over the last six years and not much was learned from planning officers. It's good to have someone on side who knows legislation and case history and, put bluntly, has a vested interested in helping you because they are being paid to do so. That is not what planning officers provide. They place the obstacles, you have to negotiate them.

    If you think you come from a place that isn't easy to obtain planning, it is incredibly valuable to have someone who can guide you. A dwelling on a large plot may be situated in countryside and have a raft of restrictions to negotiate. Taking a blank piece of paper to the planning office is unlikely to help anyone and creating drawings may be premature.

    There will be planning consultants at Grand Designs so it would be worth booking a free appointment in advance at least.
    Last edited by Doozergirl; 10-03-2018 at 1:01 PM.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
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