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  • FIRST POST
    • 50Twuncle
    • By 50Twuncle 9th Mar 18, 11:42 AM
    • 8,350Posts
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    50Twuncle
    Evergreen no rake moss remover lawn food
    • #1
    • 9th Mar 18, 11:42 AM
    Evergreen no rake moss remover lawn food 9th Mar 18 at 11:42 AM
    Does "EVERGREEN no rake moss Remover Lawn Food" work ?
    It seems too good to be true ...
    We have a lot of moss in our lawn and this appears to be an easy solution....
Page 1
    • DaftyDuck
    • By DaftyDuck 9th Mar 18, 12:10 PM
    • 4,186 Posts
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    DaftyDuck
    • #2
    • 9th Mar 18, 12:10 PM
    • #2
    • 9th Mar 18, 12:10 PM
    I don't think any of the "one stop solutions" work long term, but they may make a temporary difference.

    Many lawns have moss, and some of those have a simple solution. Others have virtually none.

    Cutting too short, not feeding the lawn, and not aerating are the commonest faults that are easily treated. Shade, poor drainage, poor soil are, obviously, more difficult.

    Evergreen might help with the former group - but so would directly treating each cause. In the latter group, it might kill the moss, but not help the grass grow.

    It would be cheaper and more effective (albeit harder work) to attack the cause of moss.

    Scarifying, fertilising, aerating and allowing longer growth are key to a good lawn.
    • Justagardener
    • By Justagardener 9th Mar 18, 4:47 PM
    • 133 Posts
    • 113 Thanks
    Justagardener
    • #3
    • 9th Mar 18, 4:47 PM
    • #3
    • 9th Mar 18, 4:47 PM
    I used Mo bacter for an organic situation which uses the same bacteria as evergreen no rake moss remover I think. It worked well, the moss disappeared slowly and the fertiliser element was as good as most other fertiliser.
    • 50Twuncle
    • By 50Twuncle 9th Mar 18, 7:59 PM
    • 8,350 Posts
    • 1,975 Thanks
    50Twuncle
    • #4
    • 9th Mar 18, 7:59 PM
    • #4
    • 9th Mar 18, 7:59 PM
    I don't think any of the "one stop solutions" work long term, but they may make a temporary difference.

    Many lawns have moss, and some of those have a simple solution. Others have virtually none.

    Cutting too short, not feeding the lawn, and not aerating are the commonest faults that are easily treated. Shade, poor drainage, poor soil are, obviously, more difficult.

    Evergreen might help with the former group - but so would directly treating each cause. In the latter group, it might kill the moss, but not help the grass grow.

    It would be cheaper and more effective (albeit harder work) to attack the cause of moss.

    Scarifying, fertilising, aerating and allowing longer growth are key to a good lawn.
    Originally posted by DaftyDuck
    The grass hasn't been cut since late November - so is quite long now (about 4 inches) - and is in direct sunlight - but is still full of moss
    Anyway - we bought some evergreen and have applied it this afternoon - just before the heavens opened - so hopefully it will help......
    • Gers
    • By Gers 11th Mar 18, 4:48 PM
    • 6,477 Posts
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    Gers
    • #5
    • 11th Mar 18, 4:48 PM
    • #5
    • 11th Mar 18, 4:48 PM
    I used Mo Bacter last year so the grass got a lot better.

    Rain was constant here from August onwards and so the grass could not be cut. It's now not as long as it was, no idea why, perhaps it's just fallen over.

    The soil is always soggy, bad drainage, not much light, north facing etc. Perhaps this year I can crack it. I'll aerate it more and sprinkle on iron sulphate which seems to kill off the moss well.
    • 50Twuncle
    • By 50Twuncle 12th Mar 18, 9:12 AM
    • 8,350 Posts
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    50Twuncle
    • #6
    • 12th Mar 18, 9:12 AM
    • #6
    • 12th Mar 18, 9:12 AM
    I know that the instructions said to apply before rain but it has rained almost non-stop since the evergreen was applied - probably will have washed the chemicals away ???
    • glasgowdan
    • By glasgowdan 16th Mar 18, 4:58 PM
    • 2,895 Posts
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    glasgowdan
    • #7
    • 16th Mar 18, 4:58 PM
    • #7
    • 16th Mar 18, 4:58 PM
    It's a granular product and needs rain to dissolve it and work... so no, it won't have washed away, it will have washed into the roots of the grass, into the moss and soil, exactly as it's supposed to.

    "No rake" is just a marketing term and means absolutely nothing. All mosskiller products kill moss... it's up to you if you want to rake it out or leave it to come out over time with regular mowing. If you apply it evenly it works very well. If you apply it by hand or another inaccurate method it will miss loads of patches and not work properly. You need a spreader to apply it. NOT one of those pop open spouts on the box or anyhting else.
    • Justagardener
    • By Justagardener 17th Mar 18, 12:22 PM
    • 133 Posts
    • 113 Thanks
    Justagardener
    • #8
    • 17th Mar 18, 12:22 PM
    • #8
    • 17th Mar 18, 12:22 PM
    "No rake" is just a marketing term and means absolutely nothing
    Incorrect. These "No rake moss removers" work over a period of 2-3 weeks, Using a bacillus sp. (bacteria) to consume moss. They work. I have used them.

    These fertilisers/moss removers use high levels of potassium to kill the moss, then the bacteria consumes the broken down moss.
    Most fertilisers utilise high contents of nitrogen to make grass quickly grow and look healthy. Potassium has more of a long term benefit to the grass, giving it strength and health. This is why you will see slower results with "No Rake" high potassium products. If you have the patients these products are better. They will produce stronger grass which will compete with the moss better.
    Look for the NPK (nitrogen,phosphorus,potassium) label on the back of your fertiliser packet, every fertiliser has one.
    Last edited by Justagardener; 17-03-2018 at 1:08 PM.
    • glasgowdan
    • By glasgowdan 17th Mar 18, 3:42 PM
    • 2,895 Posts
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    glasgowdan
    • #9
    • 17th Mar 18, 3:42 PM
    • #9
    • 17th Mar 18, 3:42 PM
    MoBacter is a fickle product that many professionals avoid using because results are mixed and need very specific conditions to work really well.

    High Nitrogen feeds are something I also avoid most of the time as I always treat lawns for long term strength, not immediate green-up.
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