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    • Javens
    • By Javens 9th Mar 18, 10:37 AM
    • 49Posts
    • 14Thanks
    Javens
    Leaky radiator - advice before I call a plumber
    • #1
    • 9th Mar 18, 10:37 AM
    Leaky radiator - advice before I call a plumber 9th Mar 18 at 10:37 AM
    My knowledge of radiators/heating systems is near non existent, so apologies if I sound naive.

    There is a small leak in my parents house, coming from the bit that sticks out at the bottom of the radiator which I assume is to let water out?

    I've turned both valves off either side of the radiator which has stopped it from heating up (isolating it?).

    Will this stop the leak eventually, as the leak empties the radiator of water, or is the part that is leaking below where the water has been cut off, and therefore is going to keep leaking, resulting in the pressure dropping on the boiler?



    I may just call a plumber....
    Last edited by Javens; 09-03-2018 at 12:32 PM.
Page 1
    • EssexExile
    • By EssexExile 9th Mar 18, 10:48 AM
    • 2,815 Posts
    • 1,958 Thanks
    EssexExile
    • #2
    • 9th Mar 18, 10:48 AM
    • #2
    • 9th Mar 18, 10:48 AM
    It's going to keep leaking!
    Tall, dark & handsome. Well two out of three ain't bad.
    • Javens
    • By Javens 9th Mar 18, 10:51 AM
    • 49 Posts
    • 14 Thanks
    Javens
    • #3
    • 9th Mar 18, 10:51 AM
    • #3
    • 9th Mar 18, 10:51 AM
    Thanks. Plumber it is.
    • Aylesbury Duck
    • By Aylesbury Duck 9th Mar 18, 11:51 AM
    • 1,849 Posts
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    Aylesbury Duck
    • #4
    • 9th Mar 18, 11:51 AM
    • #4
    • 9th Mar 18, 11:51 AM
    Forgive me if it's stating the obvious, but have you checked that the drain nut is tight? That's the squared nut you can see on the end of the pipe. Don't overtighten it but undo it gently a bit, more water will come out, and then gently tighten it again. If the leak stops, turn the radiator back on and monitor it.
    Please forgive the deliberate omission of apostrophes on some posts whilst I await MSE to do something about the daft codes that appear in their place when typing on certain devices.
    • Javens
    • By Javens 9th Mar 18, 11:55 AM
    • 49 Posts
    • 14 Thanks
    Javens
    • #5
    • 9th Mar 18, 11:55 AM
    • #5
    • 9th Mar 18, 11:55 AM
    I havenít, no. I had a new boiler fitted a few weeks ago. Itís only leaking when the heating is turned off and the system is cooling down, so I just assumed it was faulty rather than not tightened.

    As itís such an old radiator/piping, I was nervous to try and tighten the bolts.
    • Aylesbury Duck
    • By Aylesbury Duck 9th Mar 18, 12:01 PM
    • 1,849 Posts
    • 2,487 Thanks
    Aylesbury Duck
    • #6
    • 9th Mar 18, 12:01 PM
    • #6
    • 9th Mar 18, 12:01 PM
    If you've got the radiator isolated, no serious damage will occur if you do cause a problem. Tackle it gently, perhaps put some penetrating oil on it a few hours beforehand. That's why loosening it first is a good idea, so you get a feel for whether it's seized or already fully tightened. If you go straight into trying to tighten it and it's already fully closed, you might strip it.
    Please forgive the deliberate omission of apostrophes on some posts whilst I await MSE to do something about the daft codes that appear in their place when typing on certain devices.
    • LandyAndy
    • By LandyAndy 9th Mar 18, 12:06 PM
    • 24,261 Posts
    • 51,243 Thanks
    LandyAndy
    • #7
    • 9th Mar 18, 12:06 PM
    • #7
    • 9th Mar 18, 12:06 PM
    If you've got the radiator isolated, no serious damage will occur if you do cause a problem. Tackle it gently, perhaps put some penetrating oil on it a few hours beforehand. That's why loosening it first is a good idea, so you get a feel for whether it's seized or already fully tightened. If you go straight into trying to tighten it and it's already fully closed, you might strip it.
    Originally posted by Aylesbury Duck

    Isn't that the system drain point? If the OP does cause a problem he's going to have a lot of water to contend with.
    • Javens
    • By Javens 9th Mar 18, 12:11 PM
    • 49 Posts
    • 14 Thanks
    Javens
    • #8
    • 9th Mar 18, 12:11 PM
    • #8
    • 9th Mar 18, 12:11 PM
    Thanks for all the info.

    As the property is rented, I!!!8217;ll let the landlord know today for them to sort out.
    • Javens
    • By Javens 9th Mar 18, 5:29 PM
    • 49 Posts
    • 14 Thanks
    Javens
    • #9
    • 9th Mar 18, 5:29 PM
    • #9
    • 9th Mar 18, 5:29 PM
    The nut needed tightening, as someone mentioned above. Took the plumber 20 seconds.

    DIY is just not my thing...
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